/ Cokin filter type for Sigma 10-20?

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Fraser on 13 Oct 2011
Can anyone advise please: I have a Sigma 10-20mm (Nikon fit) for whichI'd like to get a Cokin filter system. Local shop says it must be the "Z Pro" series, (100mm wide filters) to avoid vignetting, but I'm sure I saw a forum post - possibly not UKC - from someone saying they'd used the P series without issue.

Has anyone here got this combo of lens/filters and can offer advice?

I was hoping to get something locally over the next day or two for an upcoming trip but that's looking very unlikely if it has to be the Z Pro system, since the shop advises a possible 4 week delivery!

Any suggestions folks?
Marek - on 13 Oct 2011
In reply to Fraser:
I've used a Cokin P filter (ND grad) on the Sigma 10-20 but with the mount cut down so it only takes one filter.
unclemidge - on 13 Oct 2011
In reply to Fraser:

I have a P system and the Sigma 10-20. It does vignette at anything less than 17,18 to be honest, and as such as pondering splashing out on either a Lee setup, or possibly a Hitech one, the Lee setup I would want, would cost me 500+, whereas you can in theory get the same Hitech setup, for around 200. Either way, it's going to cost me.

I will keep the Cokin P stuff also, no way do I intend lugging any Lee's up a crag, and on the only lens I take on the hill, Sigma 17-70, I get no vignetting at all.
adnix - on 13 Oct 2011
In reply to Fraser:

Which filters are you into and what kind of use? Unless the use is very specific I've found out that in general a CPL does more or less the same job but better compared to the grad ND. For sunsets and other there might be a difference, though. For something darker like ND400 I'd really consider a bigger ring for the wide one with step down rings for other lenses. This way there wont be any light going inside it from the sides.

I bought a grad ND set and been mostly using the filter hand held which is ok with P series. If you want to test it out you can buy a ring and wide angle adapter very cheap from Ebay.
Marek - on 13 Oct 2011
In reply to adnix:
I generally find a CPL to be pretty useless for a wide-angle lens like the 10-20. Unless your composition has little sky in it you end up with part of the sky very dark and part very pale depending on where the sun is. A very unnatural effect.
adnix - on 14 Oct 2011
In reply to Marek:
> (In reply to adnix)
> I generally find a CPL to be pretty useless for a wide-angle lens like the 10-20. Unless your composition has little sky in it you end up with part of the sky very dark and part very pale depending on where the sun is. A very unnatural effect.

I see that in my pictures but don't mind it all. I actually like it. If the dark spot is in a corner it adds more dramatic feeling to the picture. This might not be the case if the circle is in the middle, though. Probably a matter of taste then.

This is with CPL and dark spot in the corner:
http://www.patagonia.fi/blog/wp-content/gallery/cima-piccola-spigolo-giallo/imgp2635.jpg

This in the middle (would be better with grad ND):
http://www.patagonia.fi/blog/wp-content/gallery/cima-piccola-spigolo-giallo/imgp2624.jpg
Marek - on 14 Oct 2011
In reply to adnix:
Yes, sometimes it's OK. I tend to cover my options in this sort of case and take the picture with and with the CPL and sometimes with an ND grad.
Fraser on 14 Oct 2011
In reply to all:

I'd wondered about cutting down the holder to avoid vignetting but wasn't sure how effective it would be. And once it's done, it's done! :?


In reply to adnix:

Re the 'which filters do I use' question: I haven't used any before other than a CPL, which I don't use very often. The real reason I want an ND grad is to stop down the sky. I'd prefer not to get any of the dark/light zonal differeences that a CPL would give on wider shots, particularly I tend to shoot wide rather than long. I'd been planning on starting with an ND4 and working my way from there.

Confused, I went to another local camera shop later on yesterday and the guy there stated point-blank I'd need the Cokin X series for using with such a wide lens, which of course seems even larger and more expensive than the Z Pro!

If I cuold get hold of just the filter alone I might try the hand-held method for a bit and see if that would be enough. Unfortunately a lot of the Cokin stuff is on back-order, depending on supplier and what I'm after.
Marek - on 14 Oct 2011
In reply to Fraser:
> (In reply to all)
>
> I'd wondered about cutting down the holder to avoid vignetting but wasn't sure how effective it would be. And once it's done, it's done! :?

1. Worked for me (no vignetting at 10mm).
2. How often do you use more than one filter?
3. They're not exactly expensive (Cokin P holders).
adnix - on 14 Oct 2011
In reply to Fraser:

> Re the 'which filters do I use' question: I haven't used any before other than a CPL, which I don't use very often. The real reason I want an ND grad is to stop down the sky. I'd prefer not to get any of the dark/light zonal differeences that a CPL would give on wider shots, particularly I tend to shoot wide rather than long. I'd been planning on starting with an ND4 and working my way from there.

ND4 is pretty good compromise if you buy only one. I bought a set from Formatt Filters. The 77mm ring I bought from Ebay. The hole in the Cokin Holder is also 77mm so that's the max for thread size. No problems with vignetting here.

http://www.formatt.co.uk/stills-filters/filters/graduated-n-d/stills-filters.aspx
Fraser on 15 Oct 2011
In reply to adnix:

Not sure if I understand you correctly. The max lens thread the holder will fit is 77mm? If that's the case, then I'm in trouble as the Sigma 10-20 is 82mm diam.

I've just found out our in-house company photographer is offloading some Cokin filters so I'm having a peek at what's available next week.



In reply to Marek:

I'll probably try doing it that way then with the P-series holder, cheers for the tip.
jamestheyip - on 15 Oct 2011
In reply to Fraser:

You can always just hold the filter by hand without a holder. I can't see why not. It works fine. I do it all the time. If you're not using a tripod you can stick the filter on the lens with a bit of tape or blue tack at the corners. Just be careful not to scratch the filter.
Fraser on 15 Oct 2011
In reply to jamestheyip:

I've been watching some pro tutorials on YouTube and in one, the photographer was swirling the filter round on front of the lens like nobody's business. The filter must have looked like a well-used ice rink by the time he was finished!

But yes, point taken about the simplest option. ;)
adnix - on 16 Oct 2011
In reply to Fraser:

The old version of Sigma 10-20 has 77mm threads which is the max for Cokin P. The filter itself is 82 or so. If you just want to test it out you could do it hand held. Once you know if you're usign it a lot you can always buy the bigger one.
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Fraser on 16 Oct 2011
In reply to adnix:

Ah right, thanks for clarifying. (Mine is the f3.5 - maybe that makes a slight difference too?)

It's a bit confusing that one place told me I need the X series (indy shop) and Jessops said the Z Pro. I think I'll try just hand-held and go from there. I'd hoped to get into Calumet today, where I bought the camera but unfortunately they're closed so it'll have to be mid-week.

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