/ NEW ARTICLE: Training to Become a Better Climber Part 4

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UKC Articles - on 13 Dec 2011
After having the moves totally sorted, Natalie went on to make a fast ascent of Raindogs, 8a, at Malham., 4 kbThis is the fourth piece in a series of training articles and is aimed at intermediate climbers (Approximate grade range of around UK E1/2, Sport grade F6b+/6c or bouldering grade V3/4 / UK Tech 6a/b).

"When you make the transition from vertical to overhanging climbs, one thing in particular takes effect - gravity..."

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=4289

davo - on 13 Dec 2011
In reply to UKC Articles:

Excellent article. keep them coming...


Cheers Dave
Michael Gordon - on 13 Dec 2011
In reply to UKC Articles:

A much better article than the others I thought. Well written and thought out
JKinsella - on 13 Dec 2011
In reply to Michael Gordon:

Agreed, I think this article is useful at higher levels then F6c as well
Ben Sharp - on 13 Dec 2011
In reply to UKC Articles: The whole series has been good, how about a winter version?

Ben
innesmac - on 13 Dec 2011
In reply to UKC Articles:

Really good set of articles that everyone could pick something up from.
Just a quick request for back round colour of table to be changed as its so har to read with grey an black
olidea - on 13 Dec 2011
In reply to UKC Articles:
Really interesting article - thanks!
Animal - on 02 Jan 2012
Yeah, but what's he done on grit?
flaneur - on 02 Jan 2012
In reply to UKC Articles:

Interesting article. To use an analogy, it teaches people how to use a hammer effectively. It describes the best grips to use to hold the hammer, how to swing it freely, hit the target cleanly and how to develop strong triceps in order to have plenty of power behind the swing. It does all these things very well. The problem is the target audience need to put in a screw.

It claims to be aimed at E1/2 leaders. There is nothing here that addresses the real reasons why most E1/2 leaders only climb E1/2 (and the major reasons why most F6b leaders only climb F6b). Clue: nothing to do with heel-hooking, Egyptians, toeing down, climbing dynamically, red-point tactics, or bat-hangs. It doesn't even hint at what might be the main factors holding most people back.

The article will likely perpetuate plateaux at this level by emphasising physical and physiological solutions to what are social and psychological problems (several factors, not just bravery) in 95% of the hundreds of E1 / 6b leaders I have seen in action.
NOG - on 10 Jan 2012
In reply to UKC Articles:
Robbie, stupid question - in your sample training programme, first box, when you say 1 set 3x3s. Does 1 set mean doing the same route three times and that's it. Or is one set doing the same route three times, have a rest, then do it again three times, have a rest, then do it again three times and you're done.
Cheers
Nick
JLS on 10 Jan 2012
In reply to flaneur:

>"will likely perpetuate plateaux at this level by emphasising physical and physiological solutions to what are social and psychological problems"

Firstly, to be fair he's a climbing coach, not a sports psychologist!

Secondly, with increased fittness, comes increase confidence. I accept this stuff may be more useful for upping your sport grade in the short term but to say it is likely to "perpetuate plateaux at this level" is IMHO rubbish.


I found the artical useful because I've been looking for some simple ideas on what sort of stuff I can do for PE.
Jon Stewart - on 10 Jan 2012
In reply to NOG:

I was a bit alarmed by the training plan too - seems to suggest sessions consisting of other stuff + 3 x Hard route + 2 x (3x3s).

I make this to be 21 hard routes in a session!!
JLS on 10 Jan 2012
In reply to Jon Stewart:

I can't actually see the training plan! All I see is a black rectangle whicn my mouse cursor suggests should be a photo...
Robbie_Phillips - on 26 Jan 2012
In reply to Jon Stewart:

Hey Jon

I was alarmed as well at this as I wouldn't say that, but I see what you have read and I think you've misunderstood what I wrote down.

1 x Set of 3x3's = 3 routes

Sorry if this is confusing, I can see how it could be. A set of 3x3 is essentially a 1x3 if you see what I mean. I will do better in future to make this clearer. In a normal session doing 3x3's you would do 3 sets of them hence the first "3" in 3x3 but in this session I have only put two so I should have written 2x3, but seeing as how I had covered 3x3's in the series I didn't want to confuse people by changing the name of the exercise.

So actually you are doing 9 x routes:

3 x Hard Routes
2 sets of 3 routes back to back (what I call 3x3's but in this case 2x3's)

I also spike the sets of 3 by making the first one a hard route too and then maintaining afterwards with slightly easier routes, so you could argue that there would be 5 x hard routes in a session.

Apologies for any misunderstanding

Robz
Robbie_Phillips - on 26 Jan 2012
In reply to flaneur:

Hey Mr Flaneur

I think you've grasped the wrong end of the hammer mate : )

Sorry just a joke

These articles are focussing on physical and technical training for indoor wall users that also go outdoors climbing trad/sport/bouldering. These articles are designed to help climbers use the wall most efficiently to aid them in improving.

Yes these articles put E1/2 at the top, but imagine that as a technical/physical level and less at a... how would you say... "How to use tools effectively" level? I'm not teaching people how to place gear or how to overcome fears for Trad, only "how to train to become a better climber" as the title suggests.

You could argue that these articles might encourage technical and physical development over social/psychological as you put it, but I never intended that nor have I said anywhere that the other issues weren't important as well. But you can't disregard the fact that being stronger/fitter/better at climbing isn't going to improve your trad grade.

And like JLS said, you will become more confident by becoming a better climber in turn which I suppose you could say is fulfilling a few of those psychological/social issues you mentioned.

Hope this clarifies things

I hope there's not too many screws loose aboot this hoos : P

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