/ Best and worst jobs

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EeeByGum - on 12 Apr 2012
According to this survey as a software engineer, I have the best job

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303772904577336230132805276.html

How do you fair?
Kimono - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:
Rather depends on the criteria i think.
For me the thought of staring at a computer screen all day sounds like a living hell. (at least, thats what i assume software engineers do?!)
I certainly wouldnt trade it in for what i do: yoga teacher in the caribbean :)

Sam_in_Leeds - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

Sort of number 5.

Not bad,not bad.

However I work in Financial Planning rather than actually being a financial planner.
wilkie14c - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:
I'm number 3. I find it tedious, dull and with no satisfaction at all :(
Miss Piggy on 12 Apr 2012 - 94-192-157-178.zone6.bethere.co.uk
In reply to Sam_in_Leeds:
> (In reply to EeeByGum)
>
> Sort of number 5.
>
> Not bad,not bad.
>
> However I work in Financial Planning rather than actually being a financial planner.

Do you bring the tea?? You are lucky mind, my profession, doesn't even come on the scale...
ceri - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum: "biologist" 27. Bit random though, as that doesn't really include the environment you work in, which i would think would make a big difference?
Hat Dude on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

Don't believe a word of it

I'm a Lumberjack and I'm OK




mkean - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:
Hmm, well I'm in at 94 (Chemist) which puts me in a worse position than the bloke who fixes the vending machine but in a slightly better position than a Cosmetologist. Nice to know that a highly qualified position in the pharmaceutical industry is being rewarded by being a lofty 5 places above a flipping nail technician.
Liam M - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum: I guess 'mind numbing tedium' wasn't one of the criteria, as that's what seemed to define my last role as a software engineer.
victim of mathematics - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

10th. Sort of. And I like it a lot.

I'd rather eat my own face off with a blunt, rusty spoon than be an actuary though...
Sam_in_Leeds - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to Miss Piggy:
Not quite.

I do the research/write the reports and he "schmoozes" and signs things off.
cfer - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum: 16th and 66th for me, think I will go with the 16th place one though

Oh and I love my job!!
Steve John B - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:
>
> How do you fair?

Must...resist...spelling...pedantry... ;)

Number 47 - accountant. "City Hall penpusher" wasn't on the list.
Christheclimber - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

Way down the list at 137 as a teacher
In reply to EeeByGum: I found it a bit of a pointless survey - take, for example, physical demands. This survey rates physical demands poorly, yet there are plenty of jobs where physical demands are one of the selling points - mountain guide, soldier, fitness trainer etc.
Jon Stewart - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum: Yay! I'm training to be an optom, which is number 12. I used to be a civil servant, which made me want to kill myself. It doesn't feature in the list, perhaps it dropped off the bottom?

The thought once occurred to me that if one wanted to crush and destroy a man entirely, to mete out to him the most terrible punishment,one at which the most fearsome murderer would tremble, shrinking from it in advance, all one would have to do would make him do work that was completely and utterly devoid of usefulness and meaning. - Dostoyevsky

With thanks to DuckEgg and Annie for bringing that to my attention.
EeeByGum - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to nickinscottishmountains:
> (In reply to EeeByGum) I found it a bit of a pointless survey - take, for example, physical demands. This survey rates physical demands poorly, yet there are plenty of jobs where physical demands are one of the selling points - mountain guide, soldier, fitness trainer etc.

I dunno. You can't really quantify enjoyment because it is so personal, but with regard to physical demands - they do count negatively because if you get injured, you are effectively out of work which kind of puts it on the same sort of zone as hiring prospects. Seems pretty objective to me.
Mike Hartley 2 - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

I'm 56... which isn't too far down the list I suppose.
GrendeI on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum: #21, not quite sure exactly what to make of that list, I absolutely love my job yet there are specialised fields in it that could be ranked at no1 or no 200 equally, yet still carry the same title.
TheDrunkenBakers - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

Mine doesnt appear on the list at all but I dont need anyone else to tell me how shit it is.
Ava Adore - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers:

Sober baker wasn't on their either? ;-)
Ava Adore - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to Ava Adore:

*there
Radioactiveman - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

58

Sure the list isn't the most boring jobs?
toad - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum: It's the Wall Street Journal, so it isn't suprising that being outside in the countryside isn't a factor, but salary and employability are. Dental Hygienist? No.3? You're kidding!
mgco3 - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum: Where is Brothel Manager in the list?? Take the punters money and hand out the towels.. Should at least be better than Dental Bloody Hygienist!!!!

Is Climbing Centre Lackey in there too??
Nutkey on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to kieran b:
> (In reply to EeeByGum)
> Rather depends on the criteria i think.
> For me the thought of staring at a computer screen all day sounds like a living hell. (at least, thats what i assume software engineers do?!)

Sometimes it's utterly tedious, a lot of the time it's just work, quite often it's pretty interesting, and occasionally my hands shake from the excitement and I can't type fast enough. I'm being quite serious.

I think I'd find teaching yoga a living hell though, so horses for courses and all that.
Caralynh - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

I'm down at 120 (nearest I can get) but wouldn't swap for higher scores. My job has plenty of plus points, so I'm happy.
Kimono - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to Nutkey:
> (In reply to kieran b)
> [...]
>

>
> I think I'd find teaching yoga a living hell though, so horses for courses and all that.

lol!
But i guess the point is that i am really into yoga and therefore im doing a job in a field that i love.
That seems to be what makes people happy

Mooncat - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

Can't place myself on this as even I'm not sure what I do, I do seem to go to an awful lot of meetings though, we even have meetings to decide what to have meetings about.
Kimono - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to Mooncat:
You're not working for the UN by any chance??

My ex worked for UNDP and all she ever did was have meeting after meeting
Mooncat - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to kieran b:

Civil Service, it seems to be the way with lots of government depts.
John_Hat - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to Liam M:
> (In reply to EeeByGum) I guess 'mind numbing tedium' wasn't one of the criteria, as that's what seemed to define my last role as a software engineer.

Yes, and Actuary is no 2??????

If there's a definition of mind-numbing tedium that's it...

Nos 44 and 47 in this house, as it happens..
Paul035 - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

I am 185th. 3 places below a maid but a whopping 8 above a dishwasher!
teh_mark - on 12 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

I don't even make the list! Although I have a degree in computing and am planning to make a nice side business out of 1, so does that mean I qualify?
SARS on 13 Apr 2012
In reply to John_Hat:

Ha. Well I'm no. 2 on the list, and the role within that space can vary hugely. My current job is very interesting - lots of interaction with the most senior members of the company; mathematically complex; market driven.

People who say actuarial work is dull don't have an understanding of what an 'actuary' does. One actuary may work on pension funds valuations, another may look at natural catastrophe risk such as APAC earthquake regions. Vastly different jobs with little crossover.
ajsteele - on 13 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

Im now at 34 but I much preferred my job when I was a lowly 143
John_Hat - on 13 Apr 2012
In reply to SARS:
> (In reply to John_Hat)
>
> Ha. Well I'm no. 2 on the list, and the role within that space can vary hugely. My current job is very interesting - lots of interaction with the most senior members of the company; mathematically complex; market driven.
>
> People who say actuarial work is dull don't have an understanding of what an 'actuary' does. One actuary may work on pension funds valuations, another may look at natural catastrophe risk such as APAC earthquake regions. Vastly different jobs with little crossover.

I did a lot of work last year on TASM, hence my comment... I'll admit it was pension funds...
kjdicken on 13 Apr 2012 - no-dns-yet.demon.co.uk
In reply to EeeByGum: 72 here joint with brick mason. but have a hobby of 15. is that sad?
Voltemands - on 13 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum: Wahey! I've recently had an (Ahem - unconditional) offer to go begin my training for number 4 in september. Can't wait to be the old one.
SARS on 13 Apr 2012
In reply to John_Hat:

Any job can be dull. I worked on a derivatives trading desk in Japan for a while. At times I was tearing my hair out with boredom.

Actuarial jobs can be good or bad - it's specific to the role. Hard to generalize, especially as in your case where you did one loosely actuarial job for one very specific area of finance. I've been in this area for more than 10 yrs and have had all types of roles.
Gordon Stainforth - on 13 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

One of the daftest lists I've ever seen, because it's based on the fallacy of weighing up immeasurable and incompatible data. It presupposes some hidden value system that's not explained; and even if it were, it could not of course be quantified. It also presupposes, surely, that the person doing the job is successful enough at it to be in work or get regular work. Yet the notion is lurking that the more difficult a job is to get the 'worse' it is. This nonsense results in some of the (surely) most satisfying jobs on this planet getting such low scores, e.g. being an artist, an actor, a publication editor, a conservationist, or a broadcaster. What I do now (author) is the most satisfying job I've ever done by quite a long way, yet it comes in at position 101 (just above a 'sewage plant operator' ... that has to be a joke, and a very good one too). The second most satisfying job I ever did was as a film and music editor, and that comes in at a derisory position 121. Just who are the wallies who've made these clever 'calculations'?

Final joke is 'Lumberjack' at the bottom, in position 200. Another good one. So Monty Python got it wrong all that time ago?

It just has to be an April fool.
andyd1970 - on 13 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum: God I am No60! I knew I should of tried harder in School :(
Troy Tempest - on 13 Apr 2012
Dental Hygiene is pretty good career- Treating patients all day, helping people, good money (often you can work 2-3 days a week and still do OK for yourself).

You'll have to look hard to find a miserable hygienist.
Dave Perry - on 14 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

I was a Human Resource Manager for over ten years.

I'm now a hedgelayer and drystone waller.

If,. by best job, measured by someone else's criteria, in this case the Wall Street Journal then HRM is at number 3.

But, if you mean by my criteria, Human Resource Manager is 50 and hedgelaying and drsytone walling is number 1.
ena sharples - on 14 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum: what a completely stupid idea-who can say what is the best job? How do you measure that? How does that measurement relate to individual attributes, skills etc. Cretinous.
1apetus - on 14 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum : We are treating this all wrong! Its a list of people who are most likely to read the wall street journal. So they can feel all smug. How many dairy farmers and lumberjacks read it compared to those at the top........

Its a self gratifying conspiracy :)
Jon Stewart - on 14 Apr 2012
In reply to ena sharples:
> (In reply to EeeByGum) what a completely stupid idea-who can say what is the best job? How do you measure that? How does that measurement relate to individual attributes, skills etc. Cretinous.

I don't think this research does a good job, but it's I think it's perfectly measurable with a decent questionnaire - ask people how satisfied they are with various aspects of their work, including some good summary statements

e.g. Which do you agree with

- I would rather kill myself using a stapler than go into work tomorrow
to
- I love my job so much that I have cut off relations with everyone I love to focus on it with every fibre of my being

and you could do a perfectly good piece of research.

I think this survey falls down a bit by trying too hard to be objective. It's the likelihood that you will enjoy your job that is the measure of a good or bad vocation. There is the complication that if the job doesn't suit you, that means you won't like it, but while some people make bad choices, I think most people end up doing something they're suited to. And good research would make a decent attempt at accounting for this in the analysis.


abseil on 15 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

Does anyone remember the Peter Cook and Dudley Moore sketch 'The worst job I ever had'? They said it was pulling lobsters out of Jayne Mansfield's *rse (blame them, not me, I'm just the messenger)
anonymouse - on 15 Apr 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:
> One of the daftest lists I've ever seen, because it's based on the fallacy of weighing up immeasurable and incompatible data.

It can be done - economists do it all the time - but it won't apply to any single person in a very meaningful way.
TryfAndy on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

166 for me. Looks like I'm going to have to force myself to enjoy work less then.
jdawg_85 - on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum: Number 9 for me.
EeeByGum - on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to Jon Stewart: In this case though, they weren't looking at the proportion of people who say they enjoy their jobs. They were looking at static measures such as employment prospects, work environment, physical demands etc etc. I know many Software Engineers who hate their jobs and I am sure there are a similar proportion of lumberjacks that love theirs. That wasn't what this survey was about.
Boulderdash86 on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum: Was at 27....now at 47...oo dear
Voltemands - on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to DavePlews89: Dental Hygiene is a damned good career. The training centre at Cardiff uni has 6 places for the hygeine / therapist Bsc, and has around 500 applicants per year! There's a reason why.
Scarab9 - on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

they've not included enjoyment or satisfaction in the calculation (something everyone seems to be missing!).

However the 5 things they have included don't appear to help any objective I can think of. It appears to be utterly pointless in every respect.

One of the daftest is that phycial demands are obviously taken as a big negative looking in the list - I'm sure a good number of people on here (as climbers and at least somewhat active and outdoorsy) would prefer something more phsical to sitting at a desk all day. (sadly I sit at a desk all day :-( )

can anyone explain any way they could use this list for any real purpose?
Alex Slipchuk on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to EeeByGum: my mobile wont show list. Either that or i need to login. Which i wont. What number is pest control. I have over 20 years of various fields and pest control is, by far, the best job I've ever had. And i work for the big boys!

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