/ Yorkshire Three Peaks!

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Alan Dixon - on 16 Apr 2012
Hello!

I am doing the Yorkshire Three Peaks in June, completing it with work for Macmillan Cancer Support.

As well as from raising money *que shameless plug* http://www.justgiving.com/Alan-Dixon0 I do want to beat all of my colleagues. Aside from getting out and walking more, or choosing more mountainous crags for climbing, does anyone have any tips and hints? Has anyone done it and have any insider beta?

Any help is much appreciated. Also any donations are gratefully received. Macmillan do fantastic things for those suffering from Cancer and their families. Even if you don't donate through me, they are well worth supporting in their own right....

Thanks UKC massive!
David Hooper - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Alan Dixon: wear trainers not boots. There is a subtle way off Pen y Ghent that avoids that man eating bog. It's worth the extra 2 or 3 k to the summit of whernside via the paved path,than a direct line up the steep chose. When you summit Ingleborough,it will take all over, keep something in reserve for the long walkoff.

Do a training recce walk taking in PYG to find the correct way off,miss out whernside and do Ingleborough to find. Orrect route back.

Done this a good few times and very enjoyable walking if you are fit for it.
Harry Holmes - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Alan Dixon: well its a walk....
but the steps up to ingleborough are exaclty the wrong spacing to completely ruin your stride, well mine atleast.
gsum - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to David Hooper: Good advice although the trainers need to be reasonably waterproof and substantial. A good way of beating the Man Eating Bog is to strap polythene bags over your trainers. This might sound daft but it works and it's definitely worth keeping your feet dry as there's another 20 long miles to go. The MEB is only a few strides.
Couldn't agree more with the advice about the Ingleborough walk-off.
malaz90 - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Alan Dixon: Me and friends did it 2 years ago. Excellent walk but yes trainers would be a yes from me, I did it in boots and regretted it. We wanted to do it in 9 and a half so ran the long stretch off whernside.

I would say recce first!

Good luck. Let us know how you get on :)

John
David Hooper - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Alan Dixon: PS you may find that some sports gels/ power bars or similar are useful to give you that extra lift towards the end when you are flagging.

PPS There is a 3 Peaks Club and Challenge. Pop into the cafe at horton in Ribblesdale at the start and punch the clock, if you get round in under 12 hours your are eligable to join the 3 peaks club. NB if you retire still pop into the cafe to clock off as they will stay open till everyone returns. (This may not be current information)
Alan Dixon - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Alan Dixon:

Hi guys,

excellent advice thank you - I have a pair of 5.10 Camp Fours... I was thinking about doing it in these, or would people reccomend someonthing more lightweight? Cheers for the Beta on the walk off. I'll be trying for lightweight approach with small Camelback typeback pack and sports gels I can eat on the way round. Aiming for a sub 8 hour time.... oh and please feel free to donate :-)
In reply to Alan Dixon: Excellent robust shoe, totally fine for walking the route (if they fit you well, obv.) but maybe too stiff and heavy for runners (?). Would you have to be running sections to do it under 8 hrs? So long since I did it I can't remember. Why not carry pies instead of horrible energy gels by the way? I don't get all that culinary masochism stuff.
Alan Dixon - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Dan Bailey - UKHillwalking.com:

Hi Dan, yes they do fit well and have done well on long approaches so far. In terms of the gels, I have tried one and it was terrible, but happy for suggestions on decent ones? Personally I think Mcvities Jamaica Ginger Cake is the best bet for energy... worked well for winter climbing. I may have to get a bit of a jogg on for sub 8 hours but I think its acheivable especially with the beta I am getting on here!!!

*constant shameless plugging*:

http://www.justgiving.com/Alan-Dixon0
Dave Hewitt - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Dan Bailey - UKHillwalking.com:

> Would you have to be running sections to do it under 8 hrs?

Don't think so. I did it in 1990 and goodness knows where my timing notes are in this mess of an office, but I'm pretty sure I got round in about 7hr40 - without running, and that was in the days before a lot of the modern paving, eg my memory is of Whernside being extremely boggy.

> Why not carry pies instead of horrible energy gels by the way? I don't get all that culinary masochism stuff.

Me neither. What's wrong with a tin of sardines, a couple of samosas and a packet of chocolate buttons? (The M&S ones are especially nice.)
Big Steve - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Alan Dixon: I done it last July for Macmillan.It is very well set up and organised.

After a long thought, I decided to opt for my regular walking boots. The bogs after Pen-y-ghent where nowhere near as bad as they had been described to me. There will be a refreshments stop set up before the long slog up to Whernside, and another one when you have done the long descent from Whernside. At the second stop there is a small cafe where you can buy a cheap pint of orange squash, very refreshing on a hot day. There are toilets there also.
I was knackered, and so had an energy gel after Ingleborough and I ran most of the way back to Horton fueled by it. I finished in 10:15. I could have comne in well under 10 hours but I stopped for a while to change my socks and apply a couple of blister pads. I was not walking particularly fast, so 12 under 12 hours is very do-able.

There will be loads of people doping it, so dont worry about losing the pack as it will be very spread out. It is impossible to get lost.

Training wise, I done some long walks in my local Chiltern Hills leading up to it, including a couple of 20 mile days.
Big Steve - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Big Steve: I should also add - part of the reason for running back was the local off licence in the village closed early; 6pm I think. the campsite in the village is good value
Alan Dixon - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Big Steve:

Thanks for the info Steve. My company do it every year so apparently its well run. I'll do a couple of long walks, swimming and cycling to train, get these thighs strong!

I'm a pretty fast walker, I don't really care what time I get but my brother did it in 7 hrs 30 walking so thats a good a target as any....

So energy gels are out...somosas and pies are in... any other suggestions?!
Alan Dixon - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Alan Dixon:

Oh and on the shoes Vs Boots thing, I have some really old walking boots but they are sooo heavy compared to others I have tried. It just wether I want to shell out £100+ for some new boots when my camp4's will do? don't get me wrong I love buying gear as much as the next guy but just debating it in my head!
David Hooper - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Alan Dixon: Dont forget to think about your pre and post event accomodation and book early.
Dave Hewitt - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Alan Dixon:

> Oh and on the shoes Vs Boots thing, I have some really old walking boots but they are sooo heavy compared to others I have tried

Given that itís effectively three unconnected hills and there are long flattish in-between bits, itís probably worth carrying a spare pair of socks to change into at some stage Ė and/or do the old trick of swapping left and right socks after a few hours so that the pressure points are slightly altered. A roll of micropore and some pre-taping of toes might well be of benefit.
lizard-16-07 - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Alan Dixon: if you are looking to beat colleagues, run the descents and you'll save masses of time - did this at the weekend and it really worked, up and down Pen Y Ghent in less than an hour. The descent off Whernside is nice and steady, emjoy it. Refuel regularly, especially at the top of Ingleborough - don't underestimate the walk off, which after a good 20 miles in the legs is a slog. Enjoy!
Alan Dixon - on 16 Apr 2012
In reply to Alan Dixon: ]

Keep the tips coming! Extra socks and plasters are on the kit list thanks for the reccomendations. I have accomodation booked through my company already so thats all taken care of. For kit I was thinking of taking in some spare socks, basic first aid kit (ibuprofen & duck tape), food, a hat and water all in a small bag with camelback.
Anthony Dixon - on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to Alan Dixon:

Don't focus to heavily on beating your brother, you probably don't have it in you.

To save time be strict with your breaks, only stop for 2, 7 or 20 mins at a time.2 mins is standing drink and navigation check. 7 mins is a longer probably sitting snack/drink.20 mins is a decent refuel and rest. Be strict and time them, if you don't you will potentially lose a lot of time.
Alan Dixon - on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to Anthony Dixon:

Aah brother of mine... thanks for the encouragement.

Seriously timing advice is good, cheers.

GrahamD - on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to Anthony Dixon:

> To save time be strict with your breaks,

Alternatively, recognise the fact that there are pub stops available between each peak :-)
Lankyman - on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to GrahamD:
> (In reply to Anthony Dixon)
> Alternatively, recognise the fact that there are pub stops available between each peak :-)
Ah, that will be the lesser-known (but possibly more difficult?) Three Pubs Walk .........
MHutch - on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to gsum:
> (In reply to David Hooper) Good advice although the trainers need to be reasonably waterproof and substantial. A good way of beating the Man Eating Bog is to strap polythene bags over your trainers.

I always wonder why more people don't do it anticlockwise rather than get wet feet after five miles and horrifying blisters by 10. Plus your final summit is followed by a very quick blast down to finish.

I suppose the OP isn't allowed to do this though. The alternative bog-missing route is very easy to find, though.
Lankyman - on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to MHutch:
> (In reply to gsum)
> [...]
>
> I always wonder why more people don't do it anticlockwise
>
I thought that WAS how most folks did it? Start at Horton then PyG, Whernside, Ingleborough. I've done it a few times and always started at the Hill Inn (then going anticlockwise).
thedatastream on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to Alan Dixon:

I've been using the Y3P as a training walk for this years Fellsman so I've done it a few times this year already. My best time is 7 hours but I did jog down the steep bits of Whernside and Ingleborough

Navigation: is fairly simple. Remember to follow the path straight on over Horton Moor (not signed) when the Penygent path turns left back down to Horton.

Shoes: Camp4s should be good, will give plenty of grip going through the bogs over Horton Moor. I've done the Y3P recently with some Merrel Chameleons (http://www.merrell.com/UK/en-GB/Product.mvc.aspx/15379M/30020/Mens/Chameleon-Wrap-Slam) which are slightly less substantial than the Camp4s. Comfort is key. Take zinc oxide tape for blisters, don't bother with compeed. Tighten those laces!

Socks: A pair of liner socks and some Sealskinz Waterproof Trekking Socks keep your feet dry even through puddles and shallow bogs and hopefully blister free.

Poles: get two cheap poles and practice your Nordic walking - it's like having rocket boosters! Change the length depending on terrain - longer for downhill, shorter for uphill. Use them to push you along on the flat. Your average speed will go up and your knees/hips will ache less. Don't just do what most people do on the Y3P which is to take their poles for a walk strapped to their sack!

Food: put plenty of snacks (I like apples, malt loaf and squashed flat Golden Syrup cake ) in a rucksack compartment you can reach without having to take it off - this minimises stops. Eat whilst walking slowly. I usually refuel with a pie halfway across Horton Moor and at the top of Whernside to ensure I've got some long burn energy for the next summit.

Water: Take a Camelbak or equivalent and take frequent sips rather than stopping to get a bottle out of your rucksack.

Stopping: Don't stop for a rest, walk slower, espeically uphill. Maintain an even pace. Don't stop to eat food, walk slowly and eat on the go. Walk slowly on good ground when navigating. Just don't stop. Take photos on the move. You can stop for an hour in 5 minute increments far too easily!

When you've done, go to the Crown for a victory beer, pie and chips.

Lastly: the sign part way down from Ingleborough that says "Horton In Ribblesdale 2 3/4 miles" is lying. Do not trust it ;)

Have it!
Alan Dixon - on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to thedatastream:

Thanks for the info! I was thinking about trekking poles the other day actually... used them for the first time this winter season and they were good. I think for food I will use Jamaican Ginger Cake and some pasta in a ziplock back I can scran with my spork...Definately going to take/purchacse a camelback and will have to look at getting some waterproof socks.

I will update this thread with the time I do it in! Oh and also, please feel free to donate: http://www.justgiving.com/Alan-Dixon0
MHutch - on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to Karl Lunt:
> (In reply to MHutch)
> [...]
> I thought that WAS how most folks did it? Start at Horton then PyG, Whernside, Ingleborough. I've done it a few times and always started at the Hill Inn (then going anticlockwise).

Aaargh. Idiot head on today. I meant clockwise....
Liam M - on 18 Apr 2012
In reply to MHutch:
> (In reply to gsum)
> [...]
>
> I always wonder why more people don't do it anticlockwise rather than get wet feet after five miles and horrifying blisters by 10. Plus your final summit is followed by a very quick blast down to finish.
>

The race could be interesting that way with the direct line from Whernside summit!

Lankyman - on 19 Apr 2012
In reply to Liam M:
> (In reply to MHutch)
> [...]
>
> The race could be interesting that way with the direct line from Whernside summit!

please do NOT go down the old route from Whernside towards Gunnerfleet. The current routes up and down were re-aligned and hardened to let the massive erosion that had happened here recover. It's fenced off at the top and is gradually repairing itself. It's not the place to run down trying to save a few seconds - very doubtful anyway given the more obvious line between Whernside and Ingleborough that the current route takes.
Liam M - on 19 Apr 2012
In reply to Karl Lunt: I'm talking about the exact reversal of the current fell race route. I'm aware it's restricted outside of the race, but was just suggesting it could make an interesting descent if the race was run clockwise.
Neil Williams - on 19 Apr 2012
In reply to Karl Lunt:

And one of them is a very handy place to wait if one of your team ends up with a twisted ankle so you decide to get the train for the last stretch and miss a peak out...

Neil
Alan Dixon - on 14 May 2012
In reply to Alan Dixon:

Hello all... well the three peaks challenge is only 4 weeks away. I have taken note of everything people have suggested thanks for that. Just raising awareness of my 'just giving' page http://www.justgiving.com/Alan-Dixon0 any donations would be much appreciated!

Alan

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