/ Top rope self belay

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Milesy - on 23 Apr 2012
I know this has came up before but I am unable to add to those topics to bring one back up again so apologies for the repetition of this topic.

*disclaimer* I am aware of the dangers while solo climbing, and aware of using a shunt, soloist, gri gri etc.

I was practising with a system last night on easier ground. I anchored off at the top and threw both strands down, one strand with alpine butterflies at regular intervals. The second strand to be clove hitched, adjusted when above ground fall (or ledge fall) potential.

I was thinking about the way to clip the loops as I went. Clipping directly to krabs on my harness was no good as the loops were normally not easy to reach to my waist so I think slings cow's tailed to my belay loop. Is there likely to be any forces involved here I am not thinking of which could cause failure. Assuming the strand edges are reasonably protected at the edge.

Cheers
andy_e on 23 Apr 2012
In reply to Milesy:

There will be a higher force using longer attachment method, however, if you are using dynamic rope, two cows tails out of some spare dynamic, then it shouldn't be a problem. This is assuming you have a decent anchor! Also, using two cows tails lets you never be unclipped from the loops.

I find that method a pain if the route is anywhere requiring both hands to stay on. The safest system i use requires two ropes. ( or one long rope doubled over with a figure eight in it to create to seperate strands). On one rope i use a Trango Cinch attached to the belay loop with a twistlock carabiner. And the other rope has a petzl ascension (or basic)with a 15cm sling larks footed to the belay loop and attached to the ascension with a screwgate through the two connecting holes. (Note, the croll is not suitable as it only has one hole at the top, not two.)

This method allows you to climb with out having to tie backup knots, or pull through slack (after the first few metres). Having the ascender on a 20cm sling allows it to never really be weighted unless in a failure of the cinch. This avoids excessive wear on your ropes. Also, protect the rope edges, wear a helmet, and carry another prusik and descender, just in case!

Hope most of that makes sense.
Doghouse - on 23 Apr 2012
In reply to Milesy:

Just out of interest, why did you use Alpine Butterflies?
Milesy - on 23 Apr 2012
In reply to talon_guy:

Yeah that makes sense. Didn't take a prusik but will do and a foot loop. Thanks.
needvert on 23 Apr 2012
In reply to Milesy:

I once tried the clipping loops as a backup, but it was too much of a screw around.

While I wouldn't object to using what you've outlined on safety grounds, constantly clipping loops and feeding rope through the clove is no doubt too much of a PITA for me.

I might try leading aid on a clove hitch soon though, but aid has a high screwing around factor anyway.
Milesy - on 23 Apr 2012
In reply to Doghouse:

Just so it would be easier to release if I took a fall on one.
Milesy - on 23 Apr 2012
In reply to needvert:

You are right it was a pain, but considered it some learning experience at least rather than sitting at home alone on a nice day :)
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Doghouse - on 23 Apr 2012
In reply to Milesy:
> (In reply to Doghouse)
>
> Just so it would be easier to release if I took a fall on one.

OK, cool.

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