/ THE LOWDOWN: Martin Keller conquers the Fisch-project

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Björn Pohl - UKC - on 24 Apr 2012
Martin keller on Der mit dem Fels tanzt, 8C, Chironico, 4 kbThis evening, 24 April, I got an email which made me very happy. It was from Martin Keller:

After more than 3 years and 100+ visits, I have just climbed the "fisch-project" in Chironico.
The boulder is called "Der mit dem Fels tanzt" and it's the most funky, most crazy, most powerful, most...

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=67075
archiecb - on 24 Apr 2012
In reply to Björn Pohl - UKC:

Cool name for a problem that.
jh_oneill - on 25 Apr 2012
In reply to archiecb:

Yes it is (i had to google translate it): the rock with the dance

Though I like my phonetic translation:

The man with felt hands :-)
Björn Pohl - UKC - on 25 Apr 2012
In reply to jh_oneill: I think it's more like "He who dances with the rock"
Furanco C - on 25 Apr 2012
In reply to Björn Pohl - UKC:

Looks cool. I was hoping this was something to do with the marmolada, but this is also nice. Looks so wild.

As for the translation- I reckon you're about right. Technically there is no 'he' at the beginning, but I don't think it's too free to add it in for the carrying of semantics.
grubber on 25 Apr 2012 - chmpc105.ufs.ac.za [crow.ufs.ac.za]
In reply to Jurgan C: technically, there is!
the Der (male article) denotes a male subject.
Furanco C - on 25 Apr 2012
In reply to grubber: True, I think Bjoern has it right.
AlanLittle - on 25 Apr 2012
In reply to Björn Pohl - UKC:
> (In reply to jh_oneill) I think it's more like "He who dances with the rock"

It's "Dances With Rocks", because it's punning on the German title of Dances With Wolves.

Jiduvah - on 25 Apr 2012
In reply to grubber: isn't it Der because the word rock is masculine. Der Fels. He would be "er", and there is no wer(who) in the sentence either.
MonkeyPuzzle - on 25 Apr 2012
In reply to Jiduvah:

It's 'Dem' because the dance is 'happening' TO the rock and therefore puts into the masculine dative.

And that's all I remember from GCSE German...
teapot - on 26 Apr 2012
In reply to Björn Pohl - UKC:

Der - in this sentence means - the one who(male)

So its in effect -the one who dances with the rock

teapot - on 26 Apr 2012
In reply to teapot:
> (In reply to Björn Pohl - UKC)
>
> Der - in this sentence means - the one who(male)
>
> So its in effect -the one who dances with the rock

Remember in Dances with Wolves - Kevin Costner was called - "the one who dances with wolves"- by the Indians. Hence the tital Dances with Wolves

Fels also is closer to cliff than rock.
teapot - on 26 Apr 2012
In reply to teapot:

oh just noticed my typo of title
Furanco C - on 26 Apr 2012
In reply to teapot:
> (In reply to teapot)
> [...]
>
>
>
> Fels also is closer to cliff than rock.

That's not true. It can easily mean either.
teapot - on 26 Apr 2012
In reply to Jurgan C:

I agree. My mistake
robin mueller - on 26 Apr 2012
In reply to AlanLittle:
> (In reply to Björn Pohl - UKC)
> [...]
>
> It's "Dances With Rocks", because it's punning on the German title of Dances With Wolves.

Not sure why people have ignored you, but that seems like the best translation.

Word-for-word translation misses the point.
jonjupiter - on 29 Apr 2012
In reply to Björn Pohl - UKC:
Seems like you need a German here in the forum to clarify things.
1. Yes, it is a pun with "Dances with Wolves"
2. Der = male form and can be translated with "(he) who" or "the one who" if you wanna do it literally, so björn is right. It refers to Martin ie the climber in this context, not to the rock.
2. "Fels" simply is the material, nothing else. Everything from a small pebble to a big cliff is made of "Fels"
John1923 - on 30 Apr 2012
In reply to robin mueller:

"The rock with the dance," marks the rock out as special, there are many rocks, but only one dance. It implies that this is the rock with the only true dance, the dance that you spend a lifetime practising for, and get to do once.

"Dances with rocks" makes it sound like a generic experience, as in lots of rocks, lots of dances.
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robin mueller - on 23 May 2012
In reply to John1923:

> "Dances with rocks" makes it sound like a generic experience, as in lots of rocks, lots of dances.

Or it could be the end of a line that might begin "The man who..."

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