/ Hey KTT.......

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
David Hooper - on 22 May 2012
The mods have pulled your interesting druggist thread....dunno why....It was a good thread.....hope it was nothing I said,unless swivelling Sam complained.....
Milesy - on 22 May 2012
In reply to David Hooper:

It was still worthy of debate I think.
David Hooper - on 22 May 2012
In reply to Milesy: i know annoying isn't it.overly harsh moderation of an intelligent thread......for what purpose
simon c on 22 May 2012
In reply to David Hooper:

harking back to opiate pain relief and your points on effects can you not go on the slow release patches? we (nurse) use these a lot and seem to work well with people with less of the problems that are generally associated with traditional opiate treatment. sorry for interruption but thread gone.
David Hooper - on 22 May 2012
In reply to simon c: thanks Simon,but I have a plan and the support that will work for me ;o)
simon c on 22 May 2012
In reply to David Hooper: no worries and good to hear, sometimes difficult to know how much support and guidance people get with pain management as its so variable :-)
Morgan Woods - on 23 May 2012
In reply to David Hooper:

I didn't catch it but seems a bit odd. On the same subject....i've always thought trying to eradicate opium in Afghanistan is a pointless exercise but hadn't realised there is a massive shortage of opiate based pain killers in the west:

Why, then, was another avenue not explored? Nearly eight years ago, an international think tank, the Senlis Council, proposed an alternative approach: the West should buy the crop. Afghanistan’s poppy farmers would be licensed to produce opium for palliative medicines. There is a world shortage of pain-killing drugs, chiefly morphine and codeine, so why not put the poppy production on a legitimate basis?
At present, opium poppies come mainly from India, where 130,000 accredited farmers raise crops under strict controls. Some are even grown here in the UK, their striking lilac colours visible in the fields of Hampshire, Oxfordshire and Herefordshire. The opium is then processed into pain-killers. The World Health Organisation (WHO) says a handful of Western industrialised countries consume three quarters of available opium-based medicines and even they do not have enough to meet demand, especially with an ageing population. The WHO estimates that about 83 per cent of the world’s population have “low to nonexistent access” to palliative drugs. Needless to say, Afghanistan is one of many developing countries that has little or no access to these medications.
To many looking in from the outside, putting production on a legitimate footing seemed eminently sensible and yet it was peremptorily dismissed by Nato governments. The International Narcotics Control Board, a UN agency, called it “simplistic” and said it “does not take into account the complex situation in the country”. This scepticism might have been well-founded if the UN had come up with a better idea. But it clearly didn’t.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/afghanistan/9279920/How-did-we-allow-this-killer-trad...
David Hooper - on 23 May 2012
In reply to Morgan Woods: yes I believe it is very cost effective as well,sound 10p a tab.

We were watching a shocking news article last night where docs/organisations are failing to administer adequate pain relief to terminal patients cos the docs were scared thhey might become addicts.one poor old man was riddled with lung cancer and before he got opiate his pain on 1-10 was easy beyond 10 (his) words. Now he is on opiates,he is comfortable,lucid,painfree and dignified.
KTT on 23 May 2012 - client-86-25-236-112.mcr-bng-012.adsl.virginmedia.net
In reply to David Hooper: What happened, did someone tell the thruth?

David Hooper - on 23 May 2012
In reply to KTT: dunno mate,it was a good thread,obviously I didn't agree with you ;o), but it was raising all sorts of interesting debate.

This stupid heavy handed moderation is frustrating.

All we are gonna be left with are climbing specific threads or vapid Lemming style fluff. I'd rather have a good slanging match with an opinionated opponent like your good self.

Welcome to UKBland.
Anonymous on 24 May 2012 - 188-222-210-223.zone13.bethere.co.uk
In reply to Morgan Woods:

> Why, then, was another avenue not explored? Nearly eight years ago, an international think tank, the Senlis Council, proposed an alternative approach: the West should buy the crop. Afghanistan’s poppy farmers would be licensed to produce opium for palliative medicines. There is a world shortage of pain-killing drugs, chiefly morphine and codeine, so why not put the poppy production on a legitimate basis?

And this never occurred to them before the war? Because if I was going to invade a country that had produced loads of opium before the Taliban got in power I'm pretty sure I'd think, "Right, I can buy all this opium for the NHS, or I can put all the farmers out of work and seriously piss them off". Yeah, I'm pretty sure that would have occurred to me.

Don't forget most of our heroin comes from Afgan too.

www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2102158/Heroin-production-Afghanistan-RISEN-61.html
www.independent.co.uk/news/drugs-trade-the-third-largest-economy-1072489.html
www.guardian.co.uk/global/2009/dec/13/drug-money-banks-saved-un-cfief-claims
David Hooper - on 24 May 2012
In reply to Anonymous: opium is unrefined heroin,with morphine being a half way stage.

But now that folk have mentioned it,it does seem pretty obvious to buy up all the crop each year.We need it for pharma use,the opium farmers get a fair price,the taliban lose a revenue stream.

All makes perfect sense to me,but I'm not a clever politician.
mkean - on 24 May 2012
In reply to David Hooper:
All makes perfect sense to me,but I'm not a clever politician.

Probably a cunning plan let down by paperwork, there are a lot of hoops a potential pharmaceutical buyer would have to jump through to buy it and even more before you sell it on. Just look at the fun that Central African countries have with trading rare earth metals and diamonds, then add on the extra regulation of the pharma industry and you've got a real headache. To the best of my knowledge most of the big pharma companies already grow their own to ensure quality of supply.

Anonymous on 24 May 2012 - 188-222-210-223.zone13.bethere.co.uk
In reply to David Hooper:

12,500 - 29,500 civilians killed, not to mention civilians wounded, insurgents (not terrorists) killed and wounded and western soldiers killed and wounded.
ads.ukclimbing.com
stroppygob - on 24 May 2012
In reply to David Hooper: Does anyone else think that legitimising the production woudl result in far more crops being grown, leading to over production, which woudl still find its way onto the black market. Not only that but the Taliban would profit from this market, and also kill any farmer who didn't go along with their wishes.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.