/ Steve House short film

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TonyG - on 23 May 2012
Fantastic short film written by and starring Steve House. Beautifully shot...

http://learn.usa.canon.com/galleries/galleries/sample_videos/shattered.shtml
Tim Chappell - on 23 May 2012
In reply to TonyG:


Very good.

Pretty pushy route to solo.

Nice quotation from Rilke.
thommi - on 23 May 2012
In reply to TonyG: wonderful. :-)
adie84 - on 23 May 2012
In reply to Tim Chappell: Is it Nemesis?
cariva - on 23 May 2012
In reply to Tim Chappell:
> (In reply to TonyG)
>
> Nice quotation from Rilke.


I liked that too

EeeByGum - on 23 May 2012
In reply to TonyG: Hurrah! A climbing vid that doesn't feature random acts of climbing set to the authors favourite chune! :-) Nice.
Tim Chappell - on 23 May 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:

Agreed. I can name a few British activists who insist on spoiling nice vids with annoying clunky whirry ambient so-called music in the background. It's just mind litter.
Hannes on 23 May 2012
In reply to thommi:
> (In reply to TonyG) wonderful. :-)

Interesting as I thought it was a load of cheesy drivel and want those five minutes of my life refunded
iksander on 23 May 2012
In reply to Hannes: +1 "My biggest fear is that I'm not worthy of luuurve" Yawn!
In reply to Tim Chappell: Had not heard of Rilke before so that's something new learnt today, but which is the quote?

I thought the film was good looking although I have some of the same cynical British reserve about the words that others have expressed more forcefully. As a keen ice climber, soloing that looks pretty nuts. No harness and no umbilicals to your tools, that's commitment!

Who knows what route it is?
Patrick Roman - on 23 May 2012
In reply to iksander:

> (In reply to Hannes) +1 "My biggest fear is that I'm not worthy of luuurve" Yawn!

Steve House went through some pretty deep introspection after Nanga Parbat. His fall from Mount Temple five years later saw him go through another pivotal period of self-reflection. Two decades of putting your life on the line, "again and again" as he says repeatedly in the film, is going to weigh heavily on your mind. I don't think it's fair to judge someone like that unless you've been to those same highs, and depths.
Damo on 23 May 2012
In reply to TobyA:
>... although I have some of the same cynical British reserve.

Toby, I would not write off skepticism or considered dislike of this twaddle so apologetically. I thought the last quarter was OK but the rest was tired, self-indulgent, try-hard twaddle. Sounded like he looked deep inside himself and found a Mark Twight article from 1993 to read out loud. The 'climber as mystic' schtick is worn, and was rarely done well anyway. As usual, Messner is to blame.

Everything you need to know about Nietzschean uberalpinism can be found here:
http://www.rockandice.com/component/zine/article/384

and I quote: "At this point, I need you to know that Iíve had many women. Iíve also climbed many mountains, but itís always been a choice between the two. Iíve never expected a woman to understand the fathomless depths of my tortured existence. As a child, I played with trucks and swords."

iksander on 23 May 2012
In reply to Patrick Roman: Full credit to his climbing, but as an art form it's too narcissistic for my liking.
Patrick Roman - on 23 May 2012
In reply to iksander:

> (In reply to Patrick Roman) Full credit to his climbing, but as an art form it's too narcissistic for my liking.

Taking the film in isolation, I agree with you. I think he's someone with a lot to say, but it often gets over-thought and lost in cliche. It's the experiences and the fallout from them that are important here, and for that you need to look beyond many of the words and much of the image.
Tim Chappell - on 23 May 2012
Myself, I wasn't really looking to mark it as an A level creative writing essay. I think you can be moved by something and laugh at it at the same time. Sure, there are cliches in this area, but so what?

If you keep choosing to confront death like Steve House has, and you yourself don't quite understand why, you're probably quite likely to reach for some fairly overwrought forms of utterance. Fair enough.
jezb1 - on 23 May 2012
In reply to TonyG: It was OK, just to note, it wasn't a solo. In the little behind the scenes bit it shows he was being belayed and wearing a harness under his clothes.
jazzyjackson on 24 May 2012
In reply to Tim Chappell:
> Myself, I wasn't really looking to mark it as an A level creative writing essay. I think you can be moved by something and laugh at it at the same time. Sure, there are cliches in this area, but so what?
>
> If you keep choosing to confront death like Steve House has, and you yourself don't quite understand why, you're probably quite likely to reach for some fairly overwrought forms of utterance. Fair enough.

It's a great short film showcasing some crazy kit as well as House's deep existential agony ; )

Why not! Watch it and feel the torment of the soloist ; )
jazzyjackson on 24 May 2012
In reply to Damo:

"Nietzschean uberalpinism"

brilliant. ohh the pain.
In reply to Tim Chappell:

> If you keep choosing to confront death like Steve House has, and you yourself don't quite understand why, you're probably quite likely to reach for some fairly overwrought forms of utterance. Fair enough.

Although Mick Fowler would probably write: "the last pitch of the day was more than a little challenging, fortunately though it was Victor's turn to make the tea at the bivvy whilst I enjoyed the view." :)

ericinbristol - on 24 May 2012
In reply to TobyA:
>

Excellent observation. Except you are not fair to MF: he would have left out the phrase 'more than'....
Captain Gear - on 24 May 2012
In reply to Damo:
>
> Sounded like he looked deep inside himself and found a Mark Twight article from 1993 to read out loud.

That made me laugh out loud!
>
davidoldfart - on 24 May 2012
In reply to TonyG: What would Don Whillans have made of this, I wonder?
Dauphin - on 24 May 2012
In reply to davidoldfart:

Deserves tw*tting. Obviously.

D
Tom Last - on 24 May 2012
In reply to TonyG:

Would make a good Calvin Klein advert.
David Hooper - on 24 May 2012
In reply to TonyG: pseuds corner - this might have impressed me in the 80's. The melancholy introspective soundtrack is a straight rip from the classic 80's alpine film "Trilogy For A Man Alone" cannot remember the climber,but the cod philosophising and pervading sense of melancholia is a straight rip
David Hooper - on 24 May 2012
In reply to David Hooper: just Google - it was christophe profitt
ads.ukclimbing.com
David Hooper - on 24 May 2012

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