/ Kenton Cool is now on summit of Everest for 10th time

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Gordon Stainforth - on 25 May 2012
Amazing that no one has mentioned it yet. He's been there with Keith Partridge for about 15mins now, and will be broadcasting shortly.
AdCo82 on 25 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

Awesome.....just hope his message broadcasted isn't all about the Olympics or Queens jubilee.
I'm sick of hearing about both.

Great news for Kenton, hope he enjoys the moment again :-)

AT
poeticshambles - on 25 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth: He spends more time up there than I do in lectures. Good effort from a fine Englishman.
Gordon Stainforth - on 25 May 2012
In reply to poeticshambles:

We're still waiting for the BBC to mention it.
BALD EAGLE - on 25 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

A top effort again from Kenton!
Al Evans on 25 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth: So f*****g what?
SCC - on 25 May 2012
In reply to Al Evans:
> (In reply to Gordon Stainforth) So f*****g what?

Awww, did we get out of the wrong side of bed today Al?

Si
Al Evans on 25 May 2012
In reply to SCC: Because
"At the end of the 2010 climbing season, 3,142 different climbers from twenty different countries had completed a total of over 5,100 climbs."
Doing it ten times seems to me a pointless excercise.
JayPee630 - on 25 May 2012
In reply to Al Evans:

Yeah, I'd like to say I don't give a f*ck too, but actually think it's pointless and pretty cringy, how many sponsorship tweets will he make this time from a Motorvodaiphone thingamy.

Blurgh.
Richard White on 25 May 2012
In reply to JayPee630:

Read this;

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-18199899

Quote "She said: "There were casualties from the day before, which was tragic and horrendous."

"There were quite a few bodies attached to the fixed lines and we had to walk round them."

"There were a couple who were still alive.

How can anyone walk around someone who is clearly in distress and probably dying?

These people are not climbers or mountaineers. i don't know what they are, but it has nothing to do with the sport / game / activity I love and enjoy so much.

I really can't get my head around this.
walts4 - on 25 May 2012
In reply to Al Evans:

> Doing it ten times seems to me a pointless excercise.


Al, your missing the whole point of the exercise.........


MONEY.......
Gordon Stainforth - on 25 May 2012
In reply to walts4:

Actually, the point of the exercise was to get that Olympic Gold medal dating from 1923 to the top. While I am not particularly interested in the Olympics, and hate the idea of indoor climbing ever becoming an Olympic sport, I think this is a rather nice link between the history of British achievement in mountaineering and the Olympics, all the more fitting in this our host year.
Blinder - on 25 May 2012
In reply to Al Evans: 'Doing it ten times seems to me a pointless excercise.'

Going to work 5 times a week also seems a pointless exercise.

RBK - on 25 May 2012
In reply to walts4:
> (In reply to Al Evans)

> MONEY.......

Indeed, fair enough to chase the Samsung cash as it's one of the few opportunities to be paid well for 'climbing', but it all just feels like a massive waste of talent where Kenton's concerned. I know he's not the first to sell out so dramatically but at least Bonnington, for example, did it in the pursuit of adventurous routes and new ground for the most part. On a related note there's a good interview with Simone Moro on his decision to give up on his Everest/ Lhotse link up without oxygen here: http://www.planetmountain.com/english/News/shownews1.lasso?l=2&keyid=39597
John Roberts (JR) - on 25 May 2012
In reply to RBK:

Kenton hasn't wasted his talent,

http://www.alpinist.com/doc/ALP06/climbing-note-cool

Lets not forget everyone grows older, has families etc and the goalposts change. Not everyone will take the necky ascents for their whole "career".
Gordon Stainforth - on 25 May 2012
In reply to John Roberts (JR):

For the larger picture:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenton_Cool

Notice too that he has also, through various climbs, raised huge amounts of money for charity.
RBK - on 25 May 2012
In reply to John Roberts (JR): It's only because of what he's done in the past that the media friendly climbing version feels odd to me, but you're right, different periods of your life demand different priorities.
Blinder - on 25 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth: Thats quick somebody has updated the wikipedia page to reflect his accent of the big E this season.
TwSpanner - on 25 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

An amazing achievement definitely. But don't the statistics say 2/10 of those that make it to the top don't make it back down. If that statistic is true then he's really pushing his luck.
dunc56 - on 25 May 2012
In reply to TwSpanner:
> (In reply to Gordon Stainforth)
>
> An amazing achievement definitely. But don't the statistics say 2/10 of those that make it to the top don't make it back down. If that statistic is true then he's really pushing his luck.

Isn't he a guide ? So doesn't he go up and down as part of his job ? He takes clients up and down ?
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fxceltic on 25 May 2012
In reply to Al Evans:
> (In reply to SCC) Because
> "At the end of the 2010 climbing season, 3,142 different climbers from twenty different countries had completed a total of over 5,100 climbs."
> Doing it ten times seems to me a pointless excercise.

Its his job Al.

What about the sherpas who have summitted 18 times or so, is that pointless too?
Orgsm on 25 May 2012
In reply to TwSpanner:
> (In reply to Gordon Stainforth)
>
> An amazing achievement definitely.

Up the ordinary "toursit" route in good weather?

No it just an ordinary ascent.

Shani - on 25 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:
> (In reply to John Roberts (JR))
>
> For the larger picture:
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenton_Cool
>
> Notice too that he has also, through various climbs, raised huge amounts of money for charity.

Anyone know what route he fell off, breaking his heels?
Simon Caldwell - on 25 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:
> We're still waiting for the BBC to mention it.

Better late than never
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-18161278
In reply to Shani:
> (In reply to Gordon Stainforth)
> [...]
>
> Anyone know what route he fell off, breaking his heels?

Major Headstress on Colossus Wall
In reply to Al Evans: Holy shit!!!! That is the most bitter and twisted post I have seen on UKC.

I hope your day improves.
victorclimber - on 25 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth: Yipee wonder how many folk he had to walk past who are still up there ,it cant be a good thing for him ,can it ?
timjones - on 25 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:
> (In reply to walts4)
>
> Actually, the point of the exercise was to get that Olympic Gold medal dating from 1923 to the top. While I am not particularly interested in the Olympics, and hate the idea of indoor climbing ever becoming an Olympic sport, I think this is a rather nice link between the history of British achievement in mountaineering and the Olympics, all the more fitting in this our host year.

You're not cynical enough ;)

I suspect that the medal was just a way of screwing sponsorship mopney out of Samsung.
JM - on 25 May 2012
Enty - on 25 May 2012
In reply to victorclimber:
> (In reply to Gordon Stainforth) Yipee wonder how many folk he had to walk past who are still up there ,it cant be a good thing for him ,can it ?

This guy binned it - had enough:
http://www.planetmountain.com/english/News/shownews1.lasso?l=2&keyid=39597

E
Enty - on 25 May 2012
In reply to JM:

Good one Andy:

ďIf you have to step over a dead body half way up then itís classed as walk. On real climbs the bodies fall to the bottomĒ.

E

The New NickB - on 25 May 2012
In reply to nickinscottishmountains:
> (In reply to Al Evans) Holy shit!!!! That is the most bitter and twisted post I have seen on UKC.
>
You have obviously led a very sheltered life Nick. Al was maybe being a bit grumpy, but he is right that it isn't really news* and I see stuff much, much worse than what Al said on UKC every day.

* Kenton Cool is a very talented climber and by all accounts all round nice guy, but that doesn't make guiding clients up the trade route news.
Al Evans on 25 May 2012
In reply to fxceltic:
> (In reply to Al Evans)
> [...]
>
> Its his job Al.
>
> What about the sherpas who have summitted 18 times or so, is that pointless too?

It certainly doesn't seem to be a big deal!
In reply to The New NickB: In a lot of people's minds, standing on the summit of Everest for the 10th time is news.
stevez - on 26 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

I think it's worth putting a few facts straight on this thread.

Firstly, if you think Kenton is making a fortune out of Samsung for this expedition then you're wrong. They basically funded the cost of doing the expedition, and 4 weeks before Kenton was due to leave for Kathmandu the funding was not in place!

Secondly, this was not a commercial expedition in that Kenton was not guiding anyone. The only guys climbing were Kenton and his cameraman Keith Partridge. Yes there were Sherpas involved but there was no one on the exped who had paid to be there.

Thirdly, the objective of the expedition was to honour a 90 year old pledge made by members of the British 1922 expedition to Everest to take the Olympic medals for alpinism they were awarded in 1924 to the top of the mountain. That pledge was given to Baron Pierre de Coubertin who was the founding father of the modern Olympic Games. It was Kenton's passion for the history of climbing on Everest that motivated him to do this expedition that was two years in the making.

I now however really hope Kenton gets to make some money off the back of this amazing story. He deserves it more than anyone.
andyathome - on 26 May 2012
In reply to stevez:
The 1922 expedition members said they would take the medal awarded in 1924 to the summit? So the pledge was made 88 years ago or 90? Shouldn't this trip have been made in 2014?

You have a source for that pledge?

Samsung paid for the 'expedition'; including sherpa support? For 'one climber' and 'his cameraman'; no commercialism there then....'No one ' had paid to be on the 'expedition'; they were paid to be on the 'expedition'.

I'm sure money will be made.

And I really don't know why its important to me.
Carpe Diem - on 26 May 2012
In reply to all:

Seems to me there's many who jump on the ' oh its only the yak / tourist route up, it's not big deal ' Bandwagon.

I'd ask any who make this comment have they been to altitude? Have they climbed above 20'000ft

I'd suggest VERY few ( Mr Evans excluded ) could answer yes. So keep you limited, envious opinions to yourself.

I've just got back from EBC and getting to 18'000ft was knackering!!! Anyone who climbs to the summit has my 100% respect!

Peace!
Bruce Hooker - on 26 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

>
Notice too that he has also, through various climbs, raised huge amounts of money for charity.

I was expecting someone to make this post! Sorry it was you though :-)

It always reminds me of when they locked up one of the Cray brothers, some old dear on the telly saying "Ee was such a luvly bloke, a real gent, an' he gave loads of money to charity!"
In reply to Carpe Diem: Couldn't agree more. We are all aware of the controversies surrounding Everest, but the controversies don't mean that endeavours on Everest are meaningless or should be belittled. Getting to the top is a significant endeavour in any man's book, doing it ten times is a very unusual significant endeavour. More newsworthy than most of the "news" these days.
In reply to Bruce Hooker: The Cray comparison doesn't belittle Kenton's charitable effort though, does it?
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craig h - on 26 May 2012
In reply to Al Evans:

I donít often get riled by post on here; after all there is a huge amount of crap posted. However people saying itís pointless and so f##king what is totally out of order.

Possibly time for a few folk to put down the coffee table guide books, get their hands on proper rock instead of a plastic climbing wall or just stick their head out of the local Tapas Bar. 10 ascents of Everest is no minor achievement; and hope Kenton does manage to make a few pounds from this endeavour.
Bruce Hooker - on 26 May 2012
In reply to Carpe Diem:

> I'd suggest VERY few ( Mr Evans excluded ) could answer yes. So keep you limited, envious opinions to yourself.

And you should perhaps just speak for yourself?

Like the "dun a lot of good for charities", the second standard daft post on this sort of thread is one which accuses people of being "jealous"! Look at the photos of that circus... what person in his right mind would want to be part of that?
Bruce Hooker - on 26 May 2012
In reply to nickinscottishmountains:
> (In reply to Bruce Hooker) The Cray comparison doesn't belittle Kenton's charitable effort though, does it?

It doesn't belittle it, no, it just puts it in perspective... just an excuse, as for that other one who's always doing similar stunts, sawing his fingers off and such like... Consumer heroes for a consumer society, but "they's all dun a lot of good you kno'!"

Carpe Diem - on 26 May 2012
In reply to Bruce Hooker:

Not very clever taking things out of context now is it?
Bruce Hooker - on 26 May 2012
In reply to craig h:

Last post on this depressing subject:

> 10 ascents of Everest is no minor achievement

But doing it once and leaving his slots for 9 other different people might have been better?
timjones - on 26 May 2012
In reply to craig h:
> (In reply to Al Evans)
>
> I donít often get riled by post on here; after all there is a huge amount of crap posted. However people saying itís pointless and so f##king what is totally out of order.

Are you sure it is the climb that people are hacked off with rather than the endless stream of self publicity and gratuitous plugs for Samsung?



craig h - on 26 May 2012
In reply to timjones:

Life these days are full of adds; just look at UKC. I just switch off to them. Who does Samsung play far anyway?
timjones - on 26 May 2012
In reply to craig h:
> (In reply to timjones)
>
> Life these days are full of adds; just look at UKC. I just switch off to them. Who does Samsung play far anyway?

Life may be full of ads but that doesn't make me any happier that Kenton Cool is exploiting the mountains to provide publicity for Samsung.
craig h - on 26 May 2012
In reply to timjones:

Is he South Korean?

I don't see a problem with anyone making an honest living, and don't see where any expoitation is taking place; unless you're a sheep and can't think for yourself?

OK a Samsung phone/item will work up Everest; but when I'm sat in a traffic jam on the M62 it makes no difference to my life!
Goucho on 26 May 2012
In reply to timjones: Kenton is a professional climber, and therefore will quite rightly take the opportunity Samsung have provided to increase the coffers.

He is a fine climber, but having said that, a 10th summit of Everest via a route which has been climbed in poor style by hundreds of people, is irrelevant in the context of climbing history.

And also, lets not forget, he makes his living out of guiding people up Everest.
ITS on 26 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:
Great achievment to have done and survived so many ascents, let alone the number of attempts he has made. Perhaps he knows when to say no, and when to go for it. So many others, sadly, seem not to have that instinct.

However, I wonder how many people can't take him seriously with a name like that!
almost sane - on 27 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

Kenton Kool is one of the guys who runs Dream Guides. This outfit offers climbing, skiing and trekking holidays/expeditions/training in the Alps and in the Himalayas.

If you are running such an outfit and you want to attract first-time customers, having one of the guys who runs the show giving tv interviews and such - great advertising. Tenth time on top of Everest - I'll go with him. And a name like Kenton Kool - that will be easy to find on the web.

I totally understand the commercial sense of what he is doing.

I also totally understand the attraction of getting paid to go to a beautiful place. I'm nowhere near Kenton Kool's league, but even I have been paid to go places that I otherwise couldn't have afforded to go, or wouldn't have been allowed to go. And this time he got a paid trip to Everest without having to look after a group of clients...
Al Evans on 27 May 2012
In reply to craig h: I think that the problem is that people on here (most) have never been to the Himalaya, many never even to the high mountains of the European Alps, thus they are emotively impressed by people who have, particularly several times, particularly successfully.
But the reality is that most fit competent mountaineers could get to the summit of Everest as it stands, particularly on a commercial expedition providing they have the funds to do it. Particularly using oxygen.
To do this once is some sort of acheivement, perhaps just below running a three hour marathon, once done it's no big deal, and certainly not 'news'. How often would you see Joe Bloggs has just run his third sub three hour marathon.
And I'm sorry that's all it is, with a bit of weather danger thrown in, in an organised guided trek up the mountain.
I am able to be impressed by subsequent ascents by someone of the same mountain, somebody doing K2 twice would be impressiveish, but Everest 10 times just doesn't cut the rubber.
dogjogger on 27 May 2012 - host81-156-111-105.range81-156.btcentralplus.com
In reply to Gordon Stainforth: how boring,and sucking on o,s unlike
mr steck and many sherpas
Andrew Smith - on 27 May 2012
In reply to Al Evans: Having a job going up Everest, or my boring desk job. Ermm, which would I choose if I had a choice?

I am sorry but you just come across as a sour faced, old, bitter, and miserable tw*t.
Al Evans on 28 May 2012
In reply to Andrew Smith:
> (In reply to Al Evans) Having a job going up Everest, or my boring desk job. Ermm, which would I choose if I had a choice?
>
> I am sorry but you just come across as a sour faced, old, bitter, and miserable tw*t.

Not sure how you can acertain that from my posts, I'm merely trying to put a sense of reasonableness into the praise for summiting Everest 10 times under the present circumstances, why that makes me sour faced,old,bitter or miserable evades me?
I know many summitees of Everest personally, including Ed Hillary, I have been on the mountain myself albeit trying a new route from the Tibetan side so I unlike many on here know exactly what it takes to summit Everest up the 'Yak' route these days if you have enough money. And I'm sorry mate, it's a bit dangerous still, but after once it ain't no big acheivement!
jon on 28 May 2012
In reply to Andrew Smith:
> (In reply to Al Evans) Having a job going up Everest, or my boring desk job. Ermm, which would I choose if I had a choice?

Ermm, you do have the choice.
David Hooper - on 28 May 2012
In reply to Bruce Hooker and Nickscottishmountains :

It's Kray with a K.

We know where you live.

The chaps will be round to administer a spelling lesson.

It will be brutal,but fair.

Be lucky, Ron and Reg
timjones - on 28 May 2012
In reply to Al Evans:

> I know many summitees of Everest personally, including Ed Hillary, I have been on the mountain myself albeit trying a new route from the Tibetan side so I unlike many on here know exactly what it takes to summit Everest up the 'Yak' route these days if you have enough money. And I'm sorry mate, it's a bit dangerous still, but after once it ain't no big acheivement!

Now there's a thought. I wonder if I could blag funding to drag a Yak up the Yak route ;)
David Hooper - on 28 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth: on a serious note,during his 10 successful ascents (he may have made more abandoned ones I don't know)a large percentage of these were paid guiding work. How many folk in trouble has he stepped past shearing his clients to and from the summit and how do you process this - justify it in your own brain? They knew the score,my priority is to my own clients. How many pleading hypoxic faces has Kenyon seen looking up at him. This isn't an attack,more a ponder on his personal coping mechanisms.

On any rescue I've gotten involved in,I've felt privileged that I could use my skills to help save a life and never gave a thought to losing the days original objective ( although I was passed off when the helicopter boys cut my duvet off an avalanche victim once ;o)
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Richard White on 28 May 2012
In reply to David Hooper:

Working as an MIA and WML holder I would personally never walk past anyone suffering or at risk.

Yes, all climbers / mountaineers know the risk. That's beside the point. The thought of ruining my clients objectives for the day / trip / course would never even be a consideration as long as they were not put at risk. It is more important to help someone than make money.

Of course I don't work at altitude and cannot say what would happen there. However, as you say David, it is a privilege to have the skills and experience to help someone else.

Rich.
stevez - on 28 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

Again, just to put some facts straight. The reason for the expedition was not about Kenton getting to 10, it was about honouring the pledge to Baron Coubertin. Clearly from a PR/funding perspective as Kenton had unearthed a link between Everest and the Olympics this expedition had to happen in 2012.

Also, there is no commercial gain from this expedition as the Samsung money covered the cost of doing it. Hopefully with the success of the expedition it now allows Kenton to make some cash out of it with a speaking tour and a TV documentary.

Kenton's back on Wednesday morning so i'm sure he'll come on here and answer your questions.
Gordon Stainforth - on 28 May 2012
In reply to stevez:

Assuming that you're addressing this to other people, because you'll see above that I haven't got any questions.
stevez - on 28 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

Sorry Gordon. Yes it was a reply to all rather than you individually!
Al Evans on 29 May 2012
In reply to timjones:
> (In reply to Al Evans)
>
> [...]
>
> Now there's a thought. I wonder if I could blag funding to drag a Yak up the Yak route ;)

They generally get turned back by the Hilary Step, however if you could change the ladder for an easy angled ramp I'm sure they would have no problem. This would open the door to all sorts of first animal ascents, dogs (though small ones could probably make it anyhow in a rucsac) horses even, the gorrillas etc should be close on their heels.
almost sane - on 29 May 2012
In reply to timjones:
> (In reply to Al Evans)
>
> [...]
>
> Now there's a thought. I wonder if I could blag funding to drag a Yak up the Yak route ;)

I had never really considered going up Everest, but your post suggests some interesting possibilities.

I could attempt to make the first ascent of Everest in a howdah on the back of an elephant. If the howdah was pressurised, I wouldn't even need to bother with all that acclimatisation nonsense :)
Nick GP - on 29 May 2012
In reply to Richard White: Do people get left when they are still alive because there is nothing anyone can do for them now? Because it is too late to save them? Because at that point the strain of trying to save someone so close to dying would compromise your own safety? I wonder if that is part of the reason people get left.

It does seem heartless and an undignified way of "going".
antolik - on 30 May 2012
In reply to Al Evans:

Al, I'm with you mate.....see this photo http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/nepal/9290288/Survivor-of-Mount-Everest-disaster-blam...

37 climbers in the picture - all above the South Summit! That's more people than in Warminster Town Centre today!!
johnjee - on 30 May 2012
Some really miserable comments in this thread. Why 10 times - largely 'cos it's his job I guess and it puts food on the table. Also I think he enjoys doing it. Simples. Maybe not paid for every trip but the majority. Anyone else jealous?

Two ascents in one week, whilst being paid for the pleasure, is newsworthy IMHO.

I remember when Kenton had his fall and saw the x-ray and the talk was that he was screwed climbing-wise. So to reach such heights (haha) after that ordeal I personally find inspirational.

The ethics of it all aren't lost on him either and he is quite thoughtful in what he does with a good combination of bringing the bacon home; charity projects; taking on new challenges; doing what he can to help others when in tricky situations (I believe he is on record as saying he wouldn't walk past those in trouble at high altitude).
big on 30 May 2012
In reply to johnjee: I'd say the boy done well! Especially as it means he'll be able to buy me and the Stonemaster a number of beers in return for the ones we bought him in the Tyn-y-Coed back when he was skint :)
steve deeming - on 31 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

Am I interested?.....No, I f*cking well am not!
lizard-16-07 - on 31 May 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth: Leeds University Hiking Club's very own Kenton features alongside renowned climber Pierre Le Pape in this video gently poking fun at hiking and climbing....http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=evlGD2TMcd4
In reply to antolik: True, but there are far more reasons to want to be near the top of the world than in Warminster town centre, aren't there?! I've lived there, I didn't find any good reason to mooch around the town centre for the day. ;-)

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