/ NEW ARTICLE: INTERVIEW: Matilda Soderlund - 8c Climber

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UKC Articles - on 08 Jun 2012
Matilda Söderlund redpointing Morlock Shocker, 8b, Frankenjura, Germany, 5 kbSeemingly out of nowhere, Swedish climber Matilda Söderlund has been hitting the headlines recently with a string of hard sport ascents, including flashing 8b+ and redpointing 8c in just a few goes.

We caught up with the young Swede in Germany, whilst she was spending some time in the Frankenjura climbing and sightseeing, to find out more about her, her climbing background, and her future plans.

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=4706

Eagle River - on 08 Jun 2012
In reply to UKC Articles:
> Seemingly out of nowhere, Swedish climber Matilda Söderlund has been hitting the headlines recently because she happens to be smoking hot and also climbs hard sport routes, including flashing 8b+ and redpointing 8c in just a few goes.

Fixed that for you.
Furanco C - on 08 Jun 2012
In reply to Eagle River: Is that really all you can offer from an in depth interview with one of the best climbers in Europe?

She sounds like she's progressing really rather quickly. If she's an endurance-fiend and has flashed an F8b+ boulder route, then F9a seems perfectly plausible. Exciting!
royal - on 08 Jun 2012

It's a fair comment, I heard that Eagle River said that James Pearson was also smoking hot anyhow so he's not being prejudice.

Matilda S looks like she's really going places, amazing achievements and never even heard of her before.
DAVETHOMAS90 - on 08 Jun 2012
In reply to Eagle River:

Pretty, impressive ;-)
USBRIT - on 09 Jun 2012
Points more and more that sport climbing is fast becoming dominated by ladies .Certainly it has opened the door to more girls taking up climbing.....now chaps do not take these comments too seriously !
DAVETHOMAS90 - on 09 Jun 2012
In reply to USBRIT:

Why not take your comments seriously!?

I love the way that climbing allows the contrasting styles and qualities of traditionally Yin/female and Yang/male to be expressed so well, and so effectively. The rise of women's standards does, I feel, make the question or debate over which style is "better" more relevant than ever.

For me, the question of relative performance between men/women is predicated on chosen modes of expression rather than physical prowess.

How many women choose to establish hard new sport climbs? Is it considered a "male" attribute to be "forcing new ground"? Is it a choice of mindset, to be playing catch up (of course, this question applies to both sexes)?

Perhaps if these questions can be addressed, there is no physical reason why the "current worlds hardest climb" can't be one established by a woman.

So.. come on girls!

Dave.
USBRIT - on 09 Jun 2012
In reply to DAVETHOMAS90:Agree Dave. Even the kids too small to belay are knocking off some of these top sport routes.Once danger is eliminated from a climb its wide open. I think most likely the only reason women are not "forcing new ground" (sport routes) is they don't own a Bosch drill . Its a piece of cake drilling a line of bolts from the top down or with aid ground up.....PS.I will soon have a top of the line Bosch drill for sale..but ladies shipping from the US is wee a bit expensive!!!
DAVETHOMAS90 - on 09 Jun 2012
In reply to USBRIT:

Ha! So we've sorted it. The gender gap can be attributed to the stereotypically male affinity with power tools. It's strange, my mother was always pretty handy with the Magimix, but it was my dad who had to put up the shelves.

The last time I used a Bosch drill, my lycra tights got ripped off when they snagged in the drill bit. I'm sticking to the bread-maker.
DAVETHOMAS90 - on 10 Jun 2012
In reply to DAVETHOMAS90:

Taking tongue out of cheek, I've been thinking a lot about the differing approach between men and women, to hard sport climbs. This is what's really exciting; it's not simply "the numbers". We've moved a long way from simply saying that men have stronger upper bodies, but women have better balance, smaller fingers etc!

I was hoping there'd be a little more about Matilda's approach to training, as I'm sure this is another area where men and women have tended to operate differently.

With more women climbing at the top end, perhaps there's more chance of the sport being better represented and understood?

Dave.
C coldwell-storry - on 08 Jul 2012


Matilda Soderlund - 8c Climber.................What a terrible tittle.
ads.ukclimbing.com
koalapie - on 08 Jul 2012
In reply to DAVETHOMAS90:
> (In reply to USBRIT)
>
> >
> Perhaps if these questions can be addressed, there is no physical reason why the "current worlds hardest climb" can't be one established by a woman.
>
> Yes perhaps, but I suspect it may not be the hardest graded route in the world. My perception is that the harder grades are more overhanging, more powerful with fewer rests, attributes wihich probably suit women less.The old addages of more uper limb muscle power, bigger fingers, less technique/balance still stick to some degree. I guess comparing these things in an indoor/plastic environment could be a good way of highlighting some differences.

Having said all that one of the things I love about climbing the most is it's multifactorial nature which contributes to performance and seemingly makes it a sport with a small gap between the genders at the elite level. I wonder how you compare between the relative gap between 9a (best female) and 9b (best male) and say male and female world marathon records!?


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