/ NEW ARTICLE: VIDEO/BIO: Classic Alpinism - Emilio Comici

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UKC Articles - on 17 Jul 2012
James Rushforth leading pitch 6 of the Comici Route, Tre Cima. As seen from the Brandler Hasse., 4 kbIn this article we have a short introduction to Italian climbing legend Emilio Comici, written by Fabrizio Mamolo, and a fantastic video that was spotted on Youtube and sent to us by Paul Ross.

Paul commented on the video in his email : "I think this would open a few eyes ... What belays?"

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=4782

Doug on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to UKC Articles: Thanks for that, the captions were quite amusing at times as well (the use of knees is forbidden ...). Anyone know where & when it was fimed ?
Diggler - on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to UKC Articles:

Belays!!!!
No sticky rubber
No harnice
No chalk
Not much in the way of gear
A rope you would only use to hang your washing on these days
An abb off said rope that looks mental
Not to mention the speed and fluidity of his movement over rock!

That's a real man. He is the ultimate polar opposite of a British bumbley!!!
Hans Lindqvist - on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to UKC Articles: amazing footage considering how the cameraman must have been balancing as well. As for the climbing it speaks for itself. Hard dolomite.
shantaram - on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to UKC Articles: Ouuch! A free hanging classic abseil done in a very smooth style. What a hero.
Darron - on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to UKC Articles:

The video music is better than most modern efforts too :-)
cbonner - on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to UKC Articles:

Puts us to shame doesn't it!
DAVETHOMAS90 - on 17 Jul 2012
Good to see they get their rope stuck like the rest of us punters heh!

Does anyone know what the opening piece of music is?

Dave T.
johncoxmysteriously - on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to UKC Articles:

I don't believe EC did free solo the Cima Grande route, did he, certainly not as I understand that term. Sans corde but using the pegs, I thought. Indeed I don't think it was done free at all until the 1960's.

jcm
tistimetogo on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to UKC Articles:
Fantastic, thanks for sharing.
Doug on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to DAVETHOMAS90:
> Good to see they get their rope stuck like the rest of us punters heh!
>
> Does anyone know what the opening piece of music is?
>
> Dave T.

Think its by Eric Satie but can't remember the name
Paul Keenan - on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to Doug / Dave T. :

It's Eric Satie - Gnossienne No. 1.

Cheers,
Paul
verygneiss - on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to UKC Articles:

Was the rope essentially there for confidence? I can't imagine that a high FF fall would do anything but kill/cause serious injury to the leader, and pull the belayer off the cliff. Nae helmets an aw...
jimtitt - on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to UKC Articles:

Shame that some of us canīt watch the video, it is blocked in Germany as the music performance rights payment hasnīt been made. Not the first time this has occured on linked videos on UKC either, the brave new media world I guess!
lmarenzi - on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to UKC Articles:

Comici wrote a bit too, and everything was published after his death in a book called Alpinismo Eroico. I don't think it was ever translated into any other language. In it he expresses, well, he expresses everything that climbing is about.

If you ever saw a German documentary made by Werner Herzog called Gasherbrum with Reinhold Messner, and you remember the scene when Messner is in a hot bath and is explaining that the climber is an artist, drawing indelible lines on the mountains like a painter would draw on a canvas, you should know that this idea comes originally from Emilio Comici.

His analogy of climbing being like ballet, in which the choreography is dictated by the features of the rock, but allows the climber a margin for their own personal expression, is not only brilliant, but completely unexpected in a young man who was from a working class background in Triest and started his working life, probably at 14, as a stevedore in the ports of his home town.

He was a visionary in his thoughts, words and deeds, and by all accounts every inch the angel of the dolomites that the legend makes him out to be.


Christheclimber - on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to lmarenzi:

Excellent amazing footage, Comici looked like a very confident climber you can see the analogy with ballet acted out here. A good climber never falls.......
Ackbar - on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to UKC Articles: His climbing style is a lot like Johnny Dawes. Nice video and music.
USBRIT - on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to UKC Articles: I read that he died in 1940 aged 39 on Selva di Val Gardena...his rope snapped....
lmarenzi - on 17 Jul 2012
In reply to Ackbar:

Good point! Its all there isn't it, the belly flop, the moves in the chimney that look like an early Quarryman, the little bounces off the feet and even one or two moves that are too fast for the camera to capture.

We had them play Erik Satie at our wedding an all!
In reply to UKC Articles: Has anyone looked at the other films on you tube ? The 1953 German Nanga Parbat expedition film was great as are the Messner and Steck videos. Why doesn't the Alpine Club put some of its films on line. Would love to see Everest the Hard Way again............
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DAVETHOMAS90 - on 18 Jul 2012
In reply to Paul Keenan:

Thanks Paul and Doug, and sorry for the delay in getting back to you. Much appreciated.

Interesting they chose this beautiful music rather than Satie's Thrash 1, 2, and 3...

Many thanks again,

Dave T.

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