/ Bad day out

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cap'nChino - on 04 Aug 2012
Ever come back from a day on the mountain and deleted all of the photos you took because they were crap. Its a depressing feeling.
wee jamie on 04 Aug 2012
In reply to cap'nChino: There have certainly been days when I haven't taken any photos at all, and that's depressing! If I take any photos, then they're generally worth keeping, maybe more as a memento of the day.
Being self-employed, I'm guilty of only going out on the days that I know are going to produce some good images (and therefore give me inspiration for new paintings). This coming winter however, I plan to rough it in some horrible weather too - it's about time I painted some clouds and rain!!
Styx - on 04 Aug 2012
I've definitely felt like doing that, yep. Try and resist the urge to delete them, come back to them another day once you're over the initial disappointment and try and see what you can do with them, with a fresh outlook you may notice things you had missed or edit them entirely differently.
dek - on 04 Aug 2012
In reply to cap'nChino:
Just 'one' bad day?!....you novice! :-)
kevin stephens - on 04 Aug 2012
In reply to cap'nChino: in the olden days we would have spend a fortune on film, double fortune on processing only to find two weeks later they were crap....Or were we more careful then to try and make shots count?
cap'nChino - on 04 Aug 2012
In reply to kevin stephens:
> (In reply to cap'nChino) in the olden days we would have spend a fortune on film, double fortune on processing only to find two weeks later they were crap....Or were we more careful then to try and make shots count?

Ha, puts it in perspective. Digital does spoil us.
What Goes Up - on 04 Aug 2012
In reply to cap'nChino: Don't delete - put them in a 'rainy Sunday' folder and use them to experiment with some different crops, processing techniques or whatever. Might not have felt like you nailed it but you'd be surprised what you can do to a pitcure when you come back to it with fresh eyes. See it as an opportunity to try someting different and learn a new skill.
Kevin Woods - on 05 Aug 2012
In reply to cap'nChino: I don't really see the point in deleting any photos, especially with the storage space we get these days. I don't delete any of mine, I tend to think that if they look rubbish it was a reflection of the time. Or if you had one of those days when the wind was blasting along at 80mph and the photo looks similarly skewed/out of focus, well - it was all part of the experience.
Hannes on 05 Aug 2012
In reply to kevin stephens:
> (In reply to cap'nChino) in the olden days we would have spend a fortune on film, double fortune on processing only to find two weeks later they were crap....Or were we more careful then to try and make shots count?

I recently scanned a bunch of old 35mm shots and came to some interesting conclusions; OOF shots don't seem too bad and are almost charming, everything is of lower quality but because you don't really look at them over 4x6" it doesn't matter. Colour and dynamic range aren't great but with all of that the keeper rate of those shots was far higher than digital, probably 1 in 2 rather than the 1 in 5 or 10 with digital.

That said I would probably have deleted most of those shots if they had been done with digital. Much of the problem I think is that I sit and look at the photos blown up over most of my 24" monitor so any imperfections really show up
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stonemaster - on 05 Aug 2012
In reply to Hannes: That's as may be but one found that with digital, one is encouraged to take a shot anyway because it does not need to be D and P'd. Or maybe one is just crap at this game....:)

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