/ Saddles.....

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Richard Carter - on 28 Sep 2012
I needed to remove my sadde to fit a new bag thing and one of my friends point out that it was very heavy (it's about 400g). So I went and bought a new saddle which is all high tech and only weighs 155g. The problem is that the new saddle is a bit harder than my old saddle and I'm finding it quite uncomfortable.

Do you get used to hard saddles, or have I wasted 30 :-P
Frank4short - on 28 Sep 2012
In reply to Richard Carter:

> Do you get used to hard saddles, or have I wasted 30 :-P

Yes and possibly yes. If the saddle fits the shape of your arse you'll get used to the lack of padding and potentially map actually find it more comfortable. However then again it may not fit the shape of your bum and will just be a pain in the arse.
Enty - on 28 Sep 2012
In reply to Richard Carter:

30 quid for 155g saddle is pretty impressive. What make is it?

And yes, harder saddles become very comfy after a few rides when the bones get used to it.

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Richard Carter - on 28 Sep 2012
In reply to Enty:

It's a 'Forza - Team Edition', but then it also mention Ridley.

I mainly bought it because I can't resit anything that says it's made of titanium :-P
Richard Carter - on 28 Sep 2012
Just to clarify only the rails are made of titanium, it's not some kind of S&M style metal saddle!!
woolsack - on 28 Sep 2012
In reply to Richard Carter: Have you played around with the angle of the dangle as it were? That might make a difference to your undercarriage
Richard Carter - on 28 Sep 2012
In reply to woolsack:

Well the saddle attachment part has a thumbscrew type thing at the front and a bolt at the back maybe I'll fiddle around with those. I'm thinking that maybe more pointing downwards might be better.
kevin stephens - on 28 Sep 2012
In reply to Richard Carter:

To get the most out of light unpadded saddles you need good quality padded shorts
Richard Carter - on 28 Sep 2012
In reply to kevin stephens:


I have some of those already.
I suspect I'll go back to using my old tried and trusted saddle :)
Albachoss - on 28 Sep 2012
In reply to Richard Carter:

Yeah it's generally a trade-off between comfort and weight. Bikes can be made lighter cause the pro's stick all the padding in the shorts. Pointing the seat down helps a little but then you find yourself slipping and this gets very annoying. Maybe keep the seat as it is but lower it just a little. This might allow you to perch right on your sit bones and not have too much pressure on the vegetables. There shouldn't be any loss in power here as you'll be better seated anyway.
nniff - on 28 Sep 2012
In reply to Richard Carter:

My fixie has got a Brooks saddle which is so comfy. My road bike has got some new fangled thing, which is OK. I swapped them over - more to be contrary than anything else - leather and copper rivets, plus carbon :o)
It was a disaster - the seating position is different and try as a might, I cannot stop the leather saddle crucifying me on the road bike. Sadly, I have had to change them back. The commute is back to its normal comfy self. The road bike's fine too, with it's little plasticky scoop thing of a saddle
lost1977 - on 28 Sep 2012
In reply to Richard Carter:

if you really find you cant get on with it i may well take it off you, need another saddle and it seems you got it for a decent price
dissonance - on 28 Sep 2012
In reply to Richard Carter:

> Do you get used to hard saddles, or have I wasted 30 :-P

possibly.
I find after some time off it does take time to adjust to the saddles on my bikes (variants of the specialised cut aways)but they are more comfy for longer rides instantly.
Some saddles simply dont suit an individual though.
balmybaldwin - on 28 Sep 2012
In reply to Richard Carter:

The bruising of your bones will stop quite quickly if you ride it at all often, and you will then find it more comfy over long distances due to the lack of chaffing that the heavy padded saddle would give you. Persevere with it for a while and you will probably feel the benefits, some adjustment and fettling may be required front to rear, or angle to get it just right. once it's there, mary the position in someway so you can get it back there if required.
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Richard Carter - on 01 Oct 2012
In reply to balmybaldwin:

"The bruising of your bones will stop quite quickly if you ride it at all often, and you will then find it more comfy over long distances due to the lack of chaffing that the heavy padded saddle would give you."

Both are almost identical in volume, size and shape. Just underneath one is just plastic and the old one is plastic but much lower type thing with padding between. So in theory it should be easy to adjust from one to the other. However the reality is I went for a 20 mile jaunt the other day and it was brutal, never stood up so much on a ride before!

Think I might put it on my commuting bike which I use much less but much more regularly (4 miles a day on avg.)

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