/ NEW ARTICLE: WC Ropeman How To #1 - Ascending the Rope

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UKC Articles - on 03 Oct 2012
Wild Country Ropeman How To #1 - Ascending the Rope, 4 kbIn the first of a short video series, International Mountain Guide Steve Long illustrates how to use the Wild Country Ropeman to ascend the rope.

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=4979
Twigger on 03 Oct 2012
In reply to UKC Articles:
Larks foot through tie-in points? I was told not to on a brenin SPA...
muppetfilter - on 04 Oct 2012
In reply to Twigger: I would be also be slightly concerned about using static slings in a system where a device could be shock loaded giving potential fall factors above 2. I dont know the test results for the modern Ropeman but I do know the old ones didnd fare too well severing the sheath at 6kn but in tests at a force as low as 3.5kn (tests on the MK 1 done by Lyon for the HSE)
Stuart (aka brt) - on 04 Oct 2012
In reply to muppetfilter:
> (In reply to Twigger) I would be also be slightly concerned about using static slings in a system where a device could be shock loaded giving potential fall factors above 2.

The use of the dynamic rope needs to be included in the equation though; granted the potential problem increases the nearer one gets to the belay. He's also pushing the top Ropeman from above his waist so never likely to be able to induce a FF2 fall (closer to a FF1 as the climber might slump back down onto the device).

> I dont know the test results for the modern Ropeman but I do know the old ones didnd fare too well severing the sheath at 6kn but in tests at a force as low as 3.5kn (tests on the MK 1 done by Lyon for the HSE)

If memory serves wasn't the 3.5kn figure the minimum strength test (so a 350kg lump hanging for three minutes: lot of friction/heat): not really the same situation?

Wasn't the dynamic test done on the test rig too (i.e. a very harsh test) at FF2, which you're not going to get near in this situation?

Personally I'd rig it slightly differently (more akin to the frog/caving system) to avoid all that having to pull up and shove the device up the rope.

Steve isn't a punter when it comes to the technical issues; it's also the method given as OK in the Ropeman instructions and I'll assume with a certain confidence that it's been tested to f**k!
Twigger on 05 Oct 2012
In reply to Stuart (aka brt):
>Steve isn't a punter when it comes to the technical issues; it's also the method given as OK in the Ropeman instructions and I'll assume with a certain confidence that it's been tested to f**k!

just conflicting info...even if doing it that way is safe (probs is) why teach else wise? where is the consistency in this industry? If any other industry was this H&S orientated, the consequences would be much more serious...
phizz4 - on 05 Oct 2012
In reply to UKC Articles: I would put the foot-loaded ropeman above the waist ropeman. It gives you something to pull on rather than the rope alone. He has connected a back-up static sling from the foot jammer to the waist, presumably as a safety back up if the waist jammer fails for some reason but almost all of the time the attachment point on the harness is above the jammer. This seems to me that we could be into ff1+ shock loading. If you use the full length of the long sling and pass it between the harness and the body, it will help to keep you more upright as you raise yourself.
jezb1 - on 05 Oct 2012
In reply to Twigger:
> (In reply to Stuart (aka brt))
> >Steve isn't a punter when it comes to the technical issues; it's also the method given as OK in the Ropeman instructions and I'll assume with a certain confidence that it's been tested to f**k!
>
> just conflicting info...even if doing it that way is safe (probs is) why teach else wise? where is the consistency in this industry? If any other industry was this H&S orientated, the consequences would be much more serious...

There's lots of areas in the outdoor industry where there are multiple ways of doing things.

Its down to you and your experience to decide on your method and use that experience to justify what your doing.

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