/ NEWS: Dry Tooling at Masson Lees

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UKC News - on 09 Oct 2012
Simon Chevis on Blind Luck at Mason Lees - Montage, 5 kbMasson Lees Quarry is one of those typical Peak District Quarries - a bit grotty, slightly ambiguous access and a bunch of good-to-mediocre sport routes. It also has a slightly justifiable reputation for loose rock on the developed sections, and even-looser rock on the 'other bits'. One of these...

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=67501
NottsRich on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to UKC News: For someone that has never been dry tooling before, are there any rotues here that would be suitable for giving it a go? An M6 sounds quite ambitous for a first go, so does anyone have any suggestions of other locations to try in the Peaks or Leicestershire quarries for M2-4 grades? Thanks.
In reply to NottsRich:
> so does anyone have any suggestions of other locations to try in the Peaks or Leicestershire quarries for M2-4 grades? Thanks.

There might be some M4s somewhere but I doubt there would be any lower. The M grade is meant to be equivalent to a WI grade and WI 2 is like 50 degree ice or so. What would be the M equivalent? Dry tooling a mod or a diff maybe? I wouldn't anyway - a) you'll look very silly and b) it will probably be a mod or a diff and someone will get upset.

I don't think leading any drytool route that isn't pretty steep would be a great idea just because you're so likely to hurt yourself if fall wearing crampons.
Blue Straggler - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to NottsRich:

Just ask to borrow the AlpKit FigFours at Nottingham Climbing Centre. Obviously not quite the same thing, but surprisingly not TOTALLY dissimilar, and in any case good fun and feels so different to climbing with your hands. And you'll get more done at the wall than you would faffing around "real" dry tooling.
Blue Straggler - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to TobyA:
>
>
> I don't think leading any drytool route that isn't pretty steep would be a great idea just because you're so likely to hurt yourself if fall wearing crampons.

Do people wear crampons for dry tooling? When we had a little go at Masson Lees (blissfully unaware that it was an M10!) we didn't. Your experience of this is far greater than mine, so this is a genuine question

galpinos - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to Blue Straggler:
> (In reply to TobyA)
> [...]
>
> Do people wear crampons for dry tooling? When we had a little go at Masson Lees (blissfully unaware that it was an M10!) we didn't. Your experience of this is far greater than mine, so this is a genuine question

Yep, normally fruit boots.

http://cascadeclimbers.com/assets/images/ice/fruit_boots.jpg
In reply to Blue Straggler: I've not done any DT in the UK, but in most of the pics I've seen they have been.
Blue Straggler - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to galpinos:

Oh right thanks...and he has them on in the video (I hadn't watched it). Well there's something I've learned. Maybe I could have done that M10 as my first DT route after all, Yeah, I'll blame my footwear :-)
maybe_si - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to UKC News:

The M9? Project is now Blind Luck (hard) M8+
NottsRich on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to TobyA: Good point about steeper routes being safer. I might just jump on and give it a go then. Thanks.
NottsRich on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to Blue Straggler: I've done a little bit with the Fig4s before and they're pretty good fun. Thanks for the suggestion though.
The Grist - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to NottsRich: I went to Masson lees for the first time on saturday and gave the dry tooling a go. I climb Scottish 5 but have avoided any of the real mixed classics and not climbed much in the Cairngorms so thought it may help me progress. I was a bit apprehensive under the m6 about my chances of success as I had never climbed a dry tooling route.

I got up the M6 clean and there is an m7 next to it that shares the same line you can top rope. Because the routes are drilled the axes feel secure. There are lots of hand changes on the axe so you would need to be leashless. I used nomics which were perfect. On my feet I borrowed some fruit boots. I would have struggled in normal crampons I think. I also tried the M10 roof but did not get far. It was so pumpy and it feels so unnatural to hang totally upside down. It really helped having someone telling me how to go about it and where to place my axes and legs etc.

All in all I think the climbs will benefit my ice climbing and I'm looking forward to a trip to White goods in North east Wales.

Sorry..........I dont know of any easier venues but the M6 is definately worth a go. The route next to it has a few hooks which you need to be careful not to destroy. A bit of delicacy is called for.

Many thanks for those who put the routes up and their continued hard work.
Si Withington - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to NottsRich: There are a few 'lower' grade lines at The Works, at Hodge Close, Coniston. Links to topo and a few pics at http://epicmountainadventures.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/dry-tooling-at-works.html
Tyler - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to TobyA:

> What would be the M equivalent? Dry tooling a mod or a diff maybe? I wouldn't anyway - a) you'll look very silly and b) it will probably be a mod or a diff and someone will get upset.

Sounds like 90% of the climbing done in the Northern Corries on an average November weekend.
Redsetter - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to UKC News: What an absolute waste of expensive gear, dry tooling does not belong anywhere especially in the peaks. Look at what happened last winter at millstone !!

This much needed gear would have been better donated to the peak bolt fund!

The sooner the land owner fills in this ugly hole the better and safer for all of us.
andyathome - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to The Grist:
> (
>
> All in all I think the climbs will benefit my ice climbing and I'm looking forward to a trip to White goods in North east Wales.
>

I'm not sure 'White Goods' is actually ice climbing.

Si dH - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to Redsetter:
> (In reply to UKC News) What an absolute waste of expensive gear, dry tooling does not belong anywhere especially in the peaks. Look at what happened last winter at millstone !!
>
> This much needed gear would have been better donated to the peak bolt fund!
>
> The sooner the land owner fills in this ugly hole the better and safer for all of us.

I have little interest in dry tooling but that really is a strange post.

The problem at Millstone was damage caused to the rock. If this was your concern at Masson Lees, why are you then advocating we fill it in? Do you want to fill in Millstone?

The point about Masson is that while worth about on visit for sport, it is pretty shitty and loose anyway and dry tooling isn't going to make much difference (personally I wouldn't be bothered if people dry tooled on the whole thing), so it's actually quite a good location for it.
Si dH - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to Si dH:
one*
mrconners - on 09 Oct 2012
>
> The sooner the land owner fills in this ugly hole the better and safer for all of us.

The cave is excellent and well worth a trip.
To fill in the quarry and resuce access to the cave would be a bit drastic.

There were some wooden holds bolted onto the underside of the overhang last time I looked, does this route use any of those?
tom290483 - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to Redsetter:
> (In reply to UKC News) What an absolute waste of expensive gear, dry tooling does not belong anywhere especially in the peaks. Look at what happened last winter at millstone !!
>
> This much needed gear would have been better donated to the peak bolt fund!
>
> The sooner the land owner fills in this ugly hole the better and safer for all of us.

Just don't go if you feel your safety is at risk.

ads.ukclimbing.com
tom290483 - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to mrconners:
> [...]
>
>
> There were some wooden holds bolted onto the underside of the overhang last time I looked, does this route use any of those?

It used too when first put up. They have now been removed and Sub Rosa makes use of a crackline upto the first lip.

fil-p - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to Redsetter: I was one of the guys who set up the tooling at hodge. It's places like hodge, Masson Lees and white goods that will help stop things like millstone happening again. With proper tooling venues being developed people shouldn't need to scratch rock elsewhere. Ok you'll get some numpty that will. What would you rather have, dedicated areas or some people taking chances on rock routes. Or is it that you wish tooling didn't happen at all, which is a shame as its following is growing in the uk.
SED - on 10 Oct 2012
In reply to UKC News:
I've been interested in tooling and ice climbing for a while now.

Are there any dedicated websites, or any ways i can find people who go tooling and get involved?

I would hazard at saying that quarries are about the only acceptable place for drytooling. Many climbers i know local to the peak will not visit mason lees, due to the sketchy and dangerous nature of the rock quality.

Bring on the toolers!
mux - on 10 Oct 2012
In reply to fil-p:
> (In reply to Redsetter) I was one of the guys who set up the tooling at hodge. It's places like hodge, Masson Lees and white goods that will help stop things like millstone happening again. With proper tooling venues being developed people shouldn't need to scratch rock elsewhere. Ok you'll get some numpty that will. What would you rather have, dedicated areas or some people taking chances on rock routes. Or is it that you wish tooling didn't happen at all, which is a shame as its following is growing in the uk.

What he said ... ^

We chose White goods for one very good reason ..its a shite hole, well it was but we are slowly cleaning it up so I guess its working well for the area,the rock is still of poor quality though and not likely to be given any attention by rock climbers ... I should know I am one of those too.. odd I know !
So through educating new people into the niche that is Drytooling we hope to stop the likes of "Cal the milstone around our neck" trashing ours and your rock routes.

As for the comment on Ice climbing and it not developing your skills ... once you have hung upside down by an axe on matchstick edges for most of a route only then will you know how much it trains your ability to use a tool, your core and your head. Everything is a slab once you have climbed at WG, Masson,Newtyle or the works..

pick up an axe and try it!

we are not all richard cranuims honest

tom.m - on 10 Oct 2012
In reply to Redsetter:

Excellent, so simply because YOU believe that it's a waste of time that should mean nothing should be invested by anyone in terms of time or money and it should be stopped.

Bit of a narrow minded point of view isn't it?
I come across many people who believe the entire sport of climbing is pointless (mostly from people who have never tried it). It's just such a shame that those ignorant sentiments come from within the climbing community. I'm not into bouldering (I think its's essentially glorified willy waving....before you say it yes I am absolutely rubbish at it;-)) but it's not my place to object to others doing it.

If you're not into dry tooling - don't click on the thread, it couldn't be more obvious what its about.....
metal arms on 10 Oct 2012
In reply to Redsetter:
> (In reply to UKC News) What an absolute waste of expensive gear, dry tooling does not belong anywhere especially in the peaks.

In the where?

I can't believe you actually got measured responses to this little rant. You must feel quite strongly about drytooling. This is an activity that has been approached responsibly, and those that partake have spent their own time and money so that others can enjoy the fruits of their labour. Also, if Gary Gibson reckons it's a hole that is no good to others it is definitely a hole that no one would want to climb.

N.B. - metal arms does not dry tool, but nor does he give a shit what others do in their spare time, as long as it doesn't harm anyone.
iksander on 10 Oct 2012
In reply to SED:
> (In reply to UKC News)
> I've been interested in tooling and ice climbing for a while now.
>
> Are there any dedicated websites, or any ways i can find people who go tooling and get involved?

http://www.drytoolinguk.com/
Blue Straggler - on 10 Oct 2012
In reply to metal arms:
> (In reply to Redsetter)
> [...]
>
> In the where?

"the peaks" was only the "especially". Redsetter thinks it doesn't belong ANYWHERE. I wonder what Redsetter thinks about real mixed winter routes. Or indeed anything where metal comes into contact with rock.
NottsRich on 10 Oct 2012
Thanks to everyone for suggestions of where to go. I've just done a bit of searching and found that there is actually some dr tooling at Ravelston Quarry in Edinburgh, about 2 miles from where I'll be moving to in a month or so. Perfect!
philhilo - on 10 Oct 2012
In reply to Redsetter: trip trap trip trap!
fil-p - on 10 Oct 2012
In reply to mux: must get down to white goods, not had chance yet. It's about time that these venues were being developed for tooling. No matter what we do it'll never stop the tooling witch hunt though. We're on with another at the mo. it's that shitty every time you do a route it's a 1st ascent. To give you an idea, 1 area is known as "diarrhoea buttress" as its that loose lol. Send me your email and I'll fire you topos etc so you can come up for a play :-)
King prawn on 11 Oct 2012
In reply to UKC News:
I like this place. About 8 yrs ago I was there and a couple of people scrambled past us with a small suitcase. A while later I topped out on a route and glanced towards the cave area... there was a softcore porn shoot (cave-girl style) taking place.

Probably the best climb of my life
tom290483 - on 11 Oct 2012
In reply to King prawn:
> (In reply to UKC News)
> I like this place. About 8 yrs ago I was there and a couple of people scrambled past us with a small suitcase. A while later I topped out on a route and glanced towards the cave area... there was a softcore porn shoot (cave-girl style) taking place.
>
> Probably the best climb of my life

LIKE
Blue Straggler - on 16 Oct 2012
In reply to Blue Straggler:
> (In reply to TobyA)
> [...]
>
> Do people wear crampons for dry tooling? When we had a little go at Masson Lees (blissfully unaware that it was an M10!) we didn't.

Dug out the photos. Some time in 2010. Our progress was minimal (we were just getting out of the rain, really, and I had a superwide angle lens to play with)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/blue-straggler/sets/72157631782709685/
Will_he_fall - on 16 Oct 2012
Does anyone know where I could get a topo for masson lees?

Cheers,

Will
Blue Straggler - on 16 Oct 2012
tom290483 - on 16 Oct 2012
In reply to Will_he_fall:

Hi Will,

If its a topo for the DT lines then......

http://tombroadbent.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/masson-lees-dt.html
edwardwoodward - on 17 Oct 2012
In reply to All:
Which is the line Judi Dench did?
mux - on 26 Oct 2012
In reply to UKC News: Just so you all know there have been some new routes put up at white goods too..

Not all hard..

The Bold Start - M7+
Dont Tumble - M6+

Both easy to clip stick and work if its your first time at the crag

Left on the doorstep - M10ish
Delicate Wash Me - M9ish ...

I do like a good ish grade

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