/ Death of a sheep.

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Ridge - on 14 Oct 2012
We were out above the Newlands valley today, and unfortunately saw a Herdwick take a nasty fall due to an over keen sheepdog. This isn't really to discuss poor shepherding skills, but I was surprised at how quickly the sheep gathered momentum.

It was on the north flank of Ard Crags, but before the really craggy bit. Maybe a 45 degree grassy slope, with a few rock steps. The sort of slope you'd think was a stiff pull up, but nothing that you'd consider particularly bad ground. After the first couple of rolls the somersaults became massively bigger, until the sheep came to rest. Sobering stuff considering the relatively shallow slope.
scottie390 - on 14 Oct 2012
did it shout 'baaaaaad day to solo' as it fell?
Minneconjou Sioux - on 14 Oct 2012
In reply to Ridge:

Yes. Unfortunately I witnessed a person falling from the top of a winter climb (no rope). It is not something I would ever wish to witness again.
highclimber - on 14 Oct 2012
In reply to Ridge: My mate saw a dog take a leap off Hobson moor a few years ago. very sad. it's never good to see death occur.
marmot hunter - on 14 Oct 2012
In reply to highclimber:
I took a big fall (50-70 foot) off the forcan Ridge once, also did a few somersaults off the cliff before bouncing through about 150 foot of scree. It hurt a bit. Wouldn't recommend it as a descent method.
althesin on 14 Oct 2012
In reply to scottie390:
For those members of UKC who care about their ovine friends, there will be a memorial service next saturday at St David's Parish Church, followed by a baahbeque.
coinneach - on 14 Oct 2012
In reply to althesin:

There is a route over in that direction which commemorates a similar event................ It's called

"Wooly Jumper"
AndrewHuddart - on 14 Oct 2012
In reply to Ridge:

A very experienced friend of a friend was killed on a 45 degree grass slope when a slip very, very quickly became being reduced to a rag doll down the hill.

I'd often class steep wet grass as possibly the most dangerous terrain in the hills.
Padraig on 14 Oct 2012
In reply to Ridge:

This was posted on here a while ago. Sheep on Idwal Slabs.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1m2HJpGtv70
Bobling - on 14 Oct 2012
In reply to scottie390:

Nice!
Ridge - on 15 Oct 2012
In reply to hindu:
Very sorry to hear that. Rag doll is a very apt description. I posted this as it's the sort of ground that many people tend to relax a bit on after doing any exposed stuff.
mypyrex - on 15 Oct 2012
In reply to althesin:
> (In reply to scottie390)
> followed by a baahbeque.

Grilled lamb chops?

Clarence - on 15 Oct 2012
In reply to Ridge:

I can remember telling my venture scouts to keep low and if you think you are going over try to spread yourself out and try to slide. I never really knew why until I saw someone go bouncing down a slope, fortunately he survived but he was in a very bad way with multiple fractures, internal bleeding and stuff. Unfortunately sheep are basically round and can't spreadeagle themselves to try and slide. Bit of a design flaw really.
Howard J - on 15 Oct 2012
In reply to hindu:
> (In reply to Ridge)
>
> I'd often class steep wet grass as possibly the most dangerous terrain in the hills.

It's a toss-up between that and steep dry grass. Especially when wearing rock shoes.

ads.ukclimbing.com
Toerag - on 15 Oct 2012
In reply to Howard J:
> (In reply to hindu)
> [...]
>
> It's a toss-up between that and steep dry grass. Especially when wearing rock shoes.

...and that's why the majority of so-called approach shoes are useless in the UK - astro trainers are much better than 'guide tennies' or similar with next to no tread.

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