/ buttering toast

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wee jamie on 18 Oct 2012
I find leaving toast to rest an an angle (to allow the toast to 'breathe')against a jar of jam, for 1 minute and 20 seconds after removal from the toaster to be the optimium time to get a little butter meltage, but not so that the toast becomes saturated and returns to a bread-like consistency.
butteredfrog - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to wee jamie:

Goes without saying it has to be proper butter as well, none of that blended with vegatable oil, spreadable muck!
omerta on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to wee jamie:

I need the toast to be hot so the butter melts. I recently discovered that both my mum and a friend of mine leave their toast to cool, which frankly, I find perverse <shakes head>
In reply to wee jamie: leave butter out to warm up beforehand makes it very spreadable when needed.

Only a hill - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to wee jamie:
But this allows the toast to cool; one must always consume toast instantly after exit from the toaster and hasty buttering.
Only a hill - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to grumpybearpantsclimbinggoat:
> (In reply to wee jamie) leave butter out to warm up beforehand makes it very spreadable when needed.

Good call.
wilkie14c - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to sarah79:
I'm with you on that one, you wouldn't cook a meal and leave it to go cold would you? These people are backward
Hannah S on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to Only a hill:
yep toast should be hot, thats why I've found it good to have a friend when having toast, then you can do 2 slices eat one each while second slice toasts then theres no colder slice.
omerta on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to grumpybearpantsclimbinggoat:
> (In reply to wee jamie) leave butter out to warm up beforehand makes it very spreadable when needed.

It also makes it very possible to cut thin slices of said butter to eat on their own, which is possibly the best thing in the world

galpinos - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to sarah79:
> (In reply to wee jamie)
>
> I need the toast to be hot so the butter melts. I recently discovered that both my mum and a friend of mine leave their toast to cool, which frankly, I find perverse <shakes head>

That's called "Holiday Toast", derived from old school hotels and B&Bs that would always have a toast rack of cold triangles of toast sat waiting for you on your table.

Perversely, I quite like it as it makes me think of holidays!
wilkie14c - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to wee jamie:
I like to dip toast in tea. I also like cold toast, that is, normal toast, buttered while hot but eaten cold many hours later.
JH74 - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to sarah79:

Good quality, non-mass-produced bread should be eaten straight from the toaster with instantly melting butter.

Mass produced bread needs to cool so it doesn't disintegrate after buttering.

It's all about the quality of the bread. Possibly the density too.

This is a great thread.
owlart - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to sarah79: Got to agree with you on that, toast is meant to be eaten still hot, and covered with plenty of butter and marmite!
JH74 - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to blanchie14c:
> (In reply to wee jamie)
> I like to dip toast in tea. I also like cold toast, that is, normal toast, buttered while hot but eaten cold many hours later.

You should see someone about that ;)

In reply to JH74:
> (In reply to sarah79)
>
> Mass produced bread needs to cool so it doesn't disintegrate after buttering.

Not true if butter is soft already - true if you've just taken the butter out of the fridge though.
owlart - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to sarah79:
> (In reply to grumpybearpantsclimbinggoat)
> [...]
>
> It also makes it very possible to cut thin slices of said butter to eat on their own, which is possibly the best thing in the world

You should meet my Mum, she applies a small amount of toast to her slice of butter before consuming!
MG - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to Only a hill:
> (In reply to wee jamie)
> But this allows the toast to cool;

Cold toast is fine - why else have toast racks that arrange slices to cool as rapidly as possible? In fact toast buttered and marmited when hot and then left to cool is probably optimal.
rocky57 - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to wee jamie:

Toast is my main meal, so it has to be hot.
Flinticus - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to wee jamie:
Best toast? While hot, spread butter, allow it to melt in. When slightly cool, spread more butter: this doesn't melt. Eat.
waterbaby - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to wee jamie:

I do this. Reason being, if you use spreadable butter the toast goes soft. This doesn't happen if you use real butter.
Clarence - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to wee jamie:

Toast should be allowed to cool to body temperature, that's what the new boys are for - line them up and use them as a toast rack.

Proper butter on cool toast so that you get a crunch and that feel of butter melting on your tongue is one of life's pleasures. Gentleman's Relish is divine on cool toast but tastes like slightly gone-off sardines on hot toast.
wilkie14c - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to Clarence:
Gentleman's Relish is divine on cool toast but tastes like slightly gone-off sardines on hot toast.

I've heard of the game 'soggy biscuit' but gentlemans 'relish' on toast?
Rigid Raider - on 18 Oct 2012
COLD toast with a thick layer of a quality butter like Président and then Marmite or a thick cut marmalade. Mmmmmm.

(Never use spreads, the water in them makes toast go soggy)

Milesy - on 18 Oct 2012
I find that toasted well, buttered and then sat on top of the toaster gives a nice ratio of crunchy toast and melted butter.
Clarence - on 18 Oct 2012
In reply to blanchie14c:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gentleman%27s_Relish

Not what you are thinking although I have never found a girlfriend who would voluntarily ingest either one.

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