/ Spinnaker Repair Tape

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Turdus torquatus on 19 Oct 2012
I've just patched Mrs T's down jacket using spinnaker repair tape. From the amount of rips and dirt on the jacket I think she's been crawling through barbed wire.

Anyway, does anyone know if the self-adhesive tape patches will survive a trip through the washing machine. You'd think so, bearing the tape's originally intended application in mind, but I don't want an empty jacket and a machine full of down.
In reply to Turdus torquatus: I tried spinnaker tape on my goretex salopettes and found it pretty rubbish. Peels off very quickly. You can stop if peeling by painting seam grip around the edge if you don't mind the splodgy look.
SCC - on 19 Oct 2012
In reply to Turdus torquatus:

Same experience as Toby. I doubt it would survive machine washing.
Although the material I used it on had a DWR finish - if the jacket in question doesn't then maybe it would fare better?

Si
Turdus torquatus on 19 Oct 2012
In reply to both:

Thanks for your replies.

Bugger.
dangerousoldfool on 19 Oct 2012
In reply to Turdus torquatus:

Use the adhesive backing to position the tape and keep it in place. Learn to sew. Sew a lock seam around the edge to keep it in place permanently. Lightly seam seal the stitching if needed.
Turdus torquatus on 19 Oct 2012
In reply to dangerousoldfool:
> (In reply to Turdus torquatus)
>
> Use the adhesive backing to position the tape and keep it in place. Learn to sew. Sew a lock seam around the edge to keep it in place permanently. Lightly seam seal the stitching if needed.

I can sew a bit, but what is a lock seam?

Tall Clare - on 19 Oct 2012
In reply to Turdus torquatus:

If you have access to a normal sewing machine, instead of creating a lock seam (which requires an overlocking machine - commonly used in commercial clothing production, and how you get the seams inside your T-shirt etc), set the machine to do wide-but-close-together zigzag stitch, and position your fabrics so the overlap line is in the 'middle' of the zigzagging. That should work.
Turdus torquatus on 19 Oct 2012
In reply to Tall Clare:

Cheers TC. I do have a sewing machine, and I've driven it a couple of times (made some antimacassars) but I'm not sure it'd work on a down jacket would it?

I won a town prize for needlework when I was nine. It was only when I went on stage to receive the award, to laughter and polite applause, that I realised something was amiss.
Dave - on 19 Oct 2012
In reply to TobyA:
> (In reply to Turdus torquatus) I tried spinnaker tape on my goretex salopettes and found it pretty rubbish. Peels off very quickly. You can stop if peeling by painting seam grip around the edge if you don't mind the splodgy look.

Probably the fabric treatment or fabric type preventing it sticking properly. Spin repair tape lasts for years on my sails.... I patched my salopettes with sticky fabric patches from a fabric/sewing shop and they've lasted pretty we'll. Or just use jesus tape.
captain paranoia - on 22 Oct 2012
In reply to Tall Clare:

> If you have access to a normal sewing machine [...] set the machine to do wide-but-close-together zigzag stitch

A sewing machine would be nice, but considering the OP is talking about applying patches to a down jacket, using a sewing machine is going to be a bit tricky without dismantling the down enclosure, or sewing through the entire down compartment...

To the OP:

I'd suggest applying patches with rounded edges, to minimise exposed points that are easier to peel off.

If the jacket has a self-fabric stuff sack (i.e. made from the same material as the face), apply a tape patch to that, and put it through a representative wash; i.e. do a test.

DWR treatments alter the surface properties of a fabric, and may well stop the tape sticking

For peace of mind, simply hand-sew a simple, angled running stitch around the edge of the tape (sew into the fabric outside the tape, bring the needle back up to the surface on inside the tape perimeter, repeat). Once washed, you could remove the stitching, I guess, if you feel it looks a bit rubbish. How often do you intend to wash the down jacket...?

Turdus torquatus on 22 Oct 2012
In reply to captain paranoia:

Thanks. Good suggestion. I've done the rounded corner thing anyway, so I'll move on to sewing them by hand too. The repair tape isn't a good colour match so the aesthetics don't matter so much now. I'm probably only going to wash it once before it gets retired.
thin bob on 22 Oct 2012
In reply to Dave:
> (In reply to TobyA)
> [...]
>
> Probably the fabric treatment or fabric type preventing it sticking properly. Spin repair tape lasts for years on my sails.... I patched my salopettes with sticky fabric patches from a fabric/sewing shop and they've lasted pretty we'll. Or just use jesus tape.

Jesus tape?!?! What do you have to do, nail it on?...:-)
Tall Clare - on 22 Oct 2012
In reply to Turdus torquatus:

Sorry - please ignore my suggestion and do as CP says.
thin bob on 22 Oct 2012
In reply to thin bob:
My aplogies:
Jesus Tape: In Finland and Sweden, they refer to duct tape as “Jesus Tape.” They also refer to it as Gaffer's tape (or "roudarin teippi" in Finnish).
http://www.octanecreative.com/ducttape/duckvsduct.html
gear boy - on 24 Oct 2012
In reply to thin bob: duct tape, gaffa tape, or rape tape are all names

to OP, IMO a glue on patch might be better if you want to wash it, hand sewing a down jacket may cause down to escape out of the holes you put in it while sewing, use a fine needle if you do sew
Dave - on 25 Oct 2012
In reply to thin bob:
> (In reply to thin bob)
> My aplogies:
> Jesus Tape: In Finland and Sweden, they refer to duct tape as “Jesus Tape.” They also refer to it as Gaffer's tape (or "roudarin teippi" in Finnish).
> http://www.octanecreative.com/ducttape/duckvsduct.html

Exactly, miraculous properties and all that...

ads.ukclimbing.com
Jim Walton on 25 Oct 2012
In reply to Turdus torquatus: A couple of tips I've found useful;

1) Cut your repair patch material into a circle (or at least cut the corners), this means the corners don't fold up.
2) Thermarest repair patches and glue are brilliant for everything.
3) Use AQUASURE instead of seam grip. It's much stronger and more flexible. Designed for sealing wet suits.
4) Heat up the sealant/glue before you use it, it spreads a little thinner and makes the finished product look better.
5) Put sealant/glue in the freezer between uses. Stores for ever. Thaw it out by placing it in a mug of hot water.
6) Place masking tape behind tear holding it together, Place damaged item on a hard flat surface, apply glue and patch, place a sheet of clingfilm over repair, place a large pan full of water over the clingfilm. Leave overnight. Perfect repair.
7) Get one of these http://marinestore.co.uk/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=KRSAILRK&Category_C... and you can stitch repair through any fabric. The "Boatswain Palm" http://www.bosunbobs.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=675&utm_source=Google&utm_medium=Shopping&u... is a very useful item to have for pushing needles through thick (Rucksack etc) fabric.
8) Find your local "Proper" Cobbler - Don't bother with Timpson's or anything like that - they have the kit to stitch ANYTHING and will do it for a very small cost.

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