/ Umberto Eco

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John Mcshea - on 29 Oct 2012
I'm Thinking of reading another Umberto Eco book. I have read The mysterious flame of queen Loana a few years ago and found it to be a beautifully crafted tale. Are there any Eco fans out there willing to suggest a second book for me to read?

Thanks,

Jb.
Rampikino - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to John Mcshea:

The Name of the Rose (try not to think Sean Connery while you are doing it)
John Mcshea - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to Rampikino:
Unfortunately I've seen the film, do you think this has destroyed the read? any other slightly off the track suggestions?
jb.
john arran - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to John Mcshea:

I made the mistake of starting to read Foucault's Pendulum a few years back - turned out to be the biggest pseudo-inellectual w@nkfest I've ever encountered and well worth avoiding.
I'm convinced the good reviews I'd read were a case of pretentious reviewers not daring to admit they couldn't see any clothes on the Emperor!
John Mcshea - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to john arran:
Being far from intellectual I shall avoid that one then. I remember Queen Loana being very readable, perhaps it was an unusual style for Eco. I've read a few books about naked emperors (at least I think) and have precious little time for another. Perhaps another recommendation?

Jb.
fergie on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to john arran:

I thought the pseudo-intellectual w@nkfest was tongue in cheek so I quite enjoyed it. Although if it were serious then I think you might be right
Mooncat - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to richardfergie:

I agree should have been edited and shortened but I enjoyed Foucaults pendulum . The one to avoid is the island of the day before.
Ridge - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to john arran:
> (In reply to John Mcshea)
>
> I made the mistake of starting to read Foucault's Pendulum a few years back - turned out to be the biggest pseudo-inellectual w@nkfest I've ever encountered and well worth avoiding.
> I'm convinced the good reviews I'd read were a case of pretentious reviewers not daring to admit they couldn't see any clothes on the Emperor!

And I thought it was just me who thought that!
Daithi O Murchu - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to John Mcshea:
> (In reply to Rampikino)
> Unfortunately I've seen the film, do you think this has destroyed the read? any other slightly off the track suggestions?
> jb.

no i saw the film first then the book, still crackin
lowersharpnose - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to john arran:

I don't give up on many books, but I didn't last long with Foucault's Pendulum.

I really enjoyed The Name of The Rose, I read it before the film was made.
Dave Kerr - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to John Mcshea:
> (In reply to Rampikino)
> Unfortunately I've seen the film, do you think this has destroyed the read?

No. The film was a straight murder mystery the book is much more complex and erudite.

I got pretty bored pretty quick with Baudolino.

The Davinci Code is basically Foucault's Pendulum with all the intellectual fripperies removed.
Bob Kemp - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to john arran:
I can quite understand anyone finding Foucault's Pendulum being hard to read, and you might call it a w@nkfest too, but why do you say it's pseudo-intellectual? Isn't it just intellectual (written by an intellectual, chucking in large amounts of knowledge and learning etc.)?

I found it pretty hard work in places, but there were actually some good jokes in there too. As somebody points out below it was meant as a satire of conspiracy theorists, especially those of the 'Holy Blood, Holy Grail' type.
winhill - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to john arran:
> (In reply to John Mcshea)
>
> I made the mistake of starting to read Foucault's Pendulum a few years back - turned out to be the biggest pseudo-inellectual w@nkfest I've ever encountered and well worth avoiding.

Couldn't get into the swing of it?



Taxi!
stroppygob - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to winhill:

> Couldn't get into the swing of it?

I was left hanging...


Cthulhu on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to john arran:
> (In reply to John Mcshea)
>
> I made the mistake of starting to read Foucault's Pendulum a few years back - turned out to be the biggest pseudo-inellectual w@nkfest I've ever encountered and well worth avoiding.
> I'm convinced the good reviews I'd read were a case of pretentious reviewers not daring to admit they couldn't see any clothes on the Emperor!

One of only two books I've given up on in my entire life. I thought it might grow on me, but it became ever-more tedious and yes, wanky...

edwardwoodward - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to Cthulhu:
I really enjoyed Name of the Rose and thought Foucault's Pendulum was excellent. I thought Island of the Day Before had a great start but I couldn't finish it. Haven't tried anything else.
John Mcshea - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to John Mcshea:
Could anyone explain the concept of w@nkfest? It's just that I've noticed that many of the posts carry the theme without question.

jb.
Dave Kerr - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to John Mcshea:
> (In reply to John Mcshea)
> Could anyone explain the concept of w@nkfest? It's just that I've noticed that many of the posts carry the theme without question.
>
> jb.

Intellectual masturbation - the act of saying or writing something very clever not for the pleasure or edification of your audience but purely for your own gratification. Showing off in other words.

The trouble with this allegation is that it is often levelled erroneously by people who don't understand or appreciate what is being said.

I believe it was Spinoza who said "One man's intellectual w@nk is another man's dazzling insight."
Cthulhu on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to Dave Kerr:
> (In reply to John Mcshea)
> [...]
>
> Intellectual masturbation - the act of saying or writing something very clever not for the pleasure or edification of your audience but purely for your own gratification. Showing off in other words.
>
> The trouble with this allegation is that it is often levelled erroneously by people who don't understand or appreciate what is being said.
>
> I believe it was Spinoza who said "One man's intellectual w@nk is another man's dazzling insight."

Well put! The problem with Foucault's Pendulum, as I recall, was not that it's dazzling insight was only available to the congoscenti, but that the dreary, turgid prose was just too dense to wade through for long. It may well have been a tremendously enjoyable and insightful read after pruning by a good editor but as it stands, it rambles on and on (and on) without getting to the point for an awfully long time, so I gave up...
Dave Kerr - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to Cthulhu:

I read FP at an impressionable age and remember feeling impressed both with the work itself and the fact that I had got through it, albeit with the dictionary close to hand. I have a suspicion that now I would just have given up.
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RupertD - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to Dave Kerr:

Been a good few years since I read them, so the following is a bit vague but:

Name of the Rose is by far the best, the main story and the historical interjections are both very good. I've re-read this book several times and still enjoy it, despite knowing the ending.

Foucaults Pendulum is less well crafted as a story, but the historical bits about the Templars are still great. It starts well but tails off - like someone said, it could have done with a bit of editing. I suppose it does come across as intellectual, but then it was written by one, so it's hard to hold that against it. I'd put it as a tied second with...

Baudolino. Again, I have memories of the main story tailing off and it is nowhere near as good as the Name of the Rose. The historical bits are the best bits again.

I struggled with The Island of the Day Before.

In conclusion I'd recommend reading NOTR despite having seen the film.

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