/ A politician finally talks sense

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Blizzard - on 29 Oct 2012
birdie num num - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to Blizzard:
He's a nutter, that Milliband bloke.
Blizzard - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to birdie num num:

Some people might say you are out of order.
Edradour - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to Blizzard:

Milliband should be ashamed of politicising an important issue in order to draw attention to himself.

The current government has been in power for 2 and a half years. Even the most politically ignorant person can see that it cannot be their fault alone. Previous to this government we had 13 years of Labour government who also contributed to the problem.

If he was serious about this he should have made a joint statement with the Prime Minister / Secretary of State for Health and putting his personal ambition to one side. Instead this is politics at its most crass and despicable.

Ironically he would have come off better if he had made this a non-partisan issue.

I have seldom felt as much contempt for a man.
In reply to Fickalli:
> (In reply to Blizzard)
>

>
> I have seldom felt as much contempt for a man.

Really?
Edradour - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to Submit to Gravity:
> (In reply to Fickalli)
> [...]
>
> [...]
>
> Really?

I mean for Milliband in general, not this specific issue.
Dirk Didler - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to Blizzard: Shock horror.....politician claims to care for mental illness/the poor/the disabled/the children,the children/the old/war vetrans/climate change.
Shoot the F*CKING lot.(politicians that is)
thin bob on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to Fickalli:
> (In reply to Blizzard)
>

>
> The current government has been in power for 2 and a half years. Even the most politically ignorant person can see that it cannot be their fault alone. Previous to this government we had 13 years of Labour government who also contributed to the problem.
> and despicable.
>

...and the blue lot before that..and the red lot before that etc etc.

There has been a recent rise in stress/depression, which might be the
impetus for the comments (although, as a politician, petty point scoring is certainly not beyond possibility)
> I have seldom felt as much contempt for a man.

Simon4 - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to Fickalli:

> Milliband should be ashamed of politicising an important issue in order to draw attention to himself.

He is quite unable to resist any passing bandwagon, but has nothing of the slightest sense or content to say when he jumps on it.

> I have seldom felt as much contempt for a man.

He is a man? More like a walking sound-bite.

The New NickB - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to Fickalli:
> (In reply to Submit to Gravity)
> [...]
>
> I mean for Milliband in general, not this specific issue.

Make your mind up, in your initial post your contempt seems to be based on what you consider a politicization of the issue. Having read the article, it seems that, accepting the fact that he is leader of the opposition, remarkably unpoliticised.
The Lemming - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to Simon4:
> (In reply to Fickalli)
>
> [...]
>
> He is quite unable to resist any passing bandwagon, but has nothing of the slightest sense or content to say when he jumps on it.
>
> [...]
>
> He is a man? More like a walking sound-bite.

Never known Cameron to do that.

Putting point scoring aside, which the article tries to point out, as a society we don't give much time to mental illnesses.

And believe me, there is a lot of it about but people are afraid or ashamed to talk about it or get it treated. There is most definitely a stigma attached to mental illnesses.

If you broke a limb or if one of your organs got damaged then you would get sympathy and treatment all round. So why not get the most complex organ treated when it goes wrong?

No shame in that, or more precisely, there should be no shame in that. That is unless you are a comedian hoping to make a cheap joke or two at somebody's expense.

Just because Milliband is jumping on a bandwagon or choosing a topic to get some airtime does not make it any less important.

Mental health issues are real and need a cultural mind shift asap.
Simon4 - on 29 Oct 2012
> Never known Cameron to do that.

All politicians do this, but Milliband is particularly guilty - largely because he has not the shadow of any genuine convictions about anything.

What on earth gives you the impression that I am defending Cameron? He is however slightly less vacuous (and I emphasise the "slightly") than Millibandwagon.

> Just because Milliband is jumping on a bandwagon or choosing a topic to get some airtime does not make it any less important.

No particular priority was given to it by Labour for 13 years, nor is there any reason to believe that this (or any other of Milliband's sound-bites) would not be forgotten the moment he obtained office. Not that any of his sound-bites amount to any sort of suggestion of anything to do about any particular issue, just "I feel your pain" style. One of the most cynical examples of this was on immigration, where (having deliberately stoked uncontrolled immigration for the entire period of the Labour government), Milliband said "you are now allowed to talk about it". Thanks mate, I didn't think I needed your permission. There was of course no hint of any tough measures that might be taken to control immigration, either from within or without the EU.

> Mental health issues are real

Perfectly true, but they always have been and always will be the cinderalla of health problems, being intractable, expensive and of very long duration. Milliband will have neither the money nor the intention of doing anything about that, it is simply a transparent attempt at buying a few votes.

Greenbanks - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to Simon4:

That's a poor call. The "Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning" programme in English primary schools from about 2003 onwards was perhaps the first concerted effort to raise awareness of mental health & emotional being amongst young children
Graeme Alderson on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to Greenbanks: No surprise really, Simon4 is perhaps UKC's most aggresive anti-Labour/pro-Tory poster. His posts are generally as credible as Bruce's. Neither of them let the truth get in the way of a good rant.
stroppygob - on 29 Oct 2012
In reply to Graeme Alderson:
> (In reply to Greenbanks) No surprise really, Simon4 is perhaps UKC's most aggresive anti-Labour/pro-Tory poster. His posts are generally as credible as Bruce's. Neither of them let the truth get in the way of a good rant.

Typical lefty response, attack the poster, not the points they raise.

After 28+ years working in mental health I can honestly say the level of public awareness and understanding of mental illness is at it's highest level ever, and successive governments have worked to promote, and funded health promotion, on the matter.

For Milliband to start acting like it's some blinding insight of his which he has been so benevolent to share with us, is nauseating.

The New NickB - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to stroppygob:
> (In reply to Graeme Alderson)
> [...]
>
> Typical lefty response, attack the poster, not the points they raise.
>
You really are predictable. The problem is, Simon hasn't raised any points, he was just in hollow attack mode.


stroppygob - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to The New NickB:
> (In reply to stroppygob)
> [...]
> You really are predictable. The problem is, Simon hasn't raised any points, he was just in hollow attack mode.

Points, directly lifted from his last post, which you may like to address, (or you can continue with your vapid personal attacks.)



1. What on earth gives you the impression that I am defending Cameron?

2. No particular priority was given to it by Labour for 13 years, nor is there any reason to believe that this (or any other of Milliband's sound-bites) would not be forgotten the moment he obtained office.

3. One of the most cynical examples of this was on immigration, where (having deliberately stoked uncontrolled immigration for the entire period of the Labour government), Milliband said "you are now allowed to talk about it".

4. There was of course no hint of any tough measures that might be taken to control immigration, either from within or without the EU.

> Mental health issues are real

5. Perfectly true, but they always have been and always will be the Cinderella of health problems, being intractable, expensive and of very long duration.

Up to you now Nick, I hope Iíve spelled it out in simple enough terms for you, what's it to be?
Edradour - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to The New NickB:
> (In reply to Fickalli)
> [...]
>
> Make your mind up, in your initial post your contempt seems to be based on what you consider a politicization of the issue. Having read the article, it seems that, accepting the fact that he is leader of the opposition, remarkably unpoliticised.

Well you misread the initial post then didn't you? I wrote about how he should be ashamed of politicising the issue and then finished by saying I held the man in contempt.

My mind is made up thank you; I have seldom held a man in such contempt.

The New NickB - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to stroppygob:
> (In reply to The New NickB)
> [...]
>
> Points, directly lifted from his last post, which you may like to address, (or you can continue with your vapid personal attacks.)
>
You are the one attacking people not me.
>
> 1. What on earth gives you the impression that I am defending Cameron?

What on earth gives you the impression that I have accused you of defending Cameron, it certainly can't be the words I have used.
>
> 2. No particular priority was given to it by Labour for 13 years, nor is there any reason to believe that this (or any other of Milliband's sound-bites) would not be forgotten the moment he obtained office.

I sort of agree that the last government didn't make it a priority, although your original post suggest otherwise, so which is it. The fact that the last government didn't make it a priority has no bearing on what future policy might be, it is true that he should be judged on actions, but give him chance, for one am glad that he is talking about it.
>
> 3. One of the most cynical examples of this was on immigration, where (having deliberately stoked uncontrolled immigration for the entire period of the Labour government), Milliband said "you are now allowed to talk about it".
>
I am not really sure how immigration is relevant, but that is bollocks.

> 5. Perfectly true, but they always have been and always will be the Cinderella of health problems, being intractable, expensive and of very long duration.

No one said it was easy.

> Up to you now Nick, I hope Iíve spelled it out in simple enough terms for you, what's it to be?

The New NickB - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to Fickalli:

It is OK to admit that you are confused!
Edradour - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to The New NickB:

Thanks! I'm not confused in this case though!
Jimbo W on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to Fickalli:

> Milliband should be ashamed of politicising an important issue in order to draw attention to himself.

Get over it. We have an adversarial party political system. All you're doing here is asking for a different system, and/or being naive about the one we have.
IanHarrison - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to Blizzard:

Before the last election many people in Britain thought the Libdems were politicians that were finally talking sense, but now they've learn't that the reality is that politicians fall into two catagories;
1. Those that say what they think you want to hear, but have no idea what it invloves.
2. Those that say what they think you want to hear, because although they understand what it invloves, they have no intention of following it through once you have voted for them.

Basically means that they're either thick or liars.
Toby S - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to The Lemming:
> (In reply to Simon4)
> [...]
>

> Putting point scoring aside, which the article tries to point out, as a society we don't give much time to mental illnesses.
>
> And believe me, there is a lot of it about but people are afraid or ashamed to talk about it or get it treated. There is most definitely a stigma attached to mental illnesses.
>
> If you broke a limb or if one of your organs got damaged then you would get sympathy and treatment all round. So why not get the most complex organ treated when it goes wrong?
>
> No shame in that, or more precisely, there should be no shame in that. That is unless you are a comedian hoping to make a cheap joke or two at somebody's expense.
>
> Just because Milliband is jumping on a bandwagon or choosing a topic to get some airtime does not make it any less important.
>
> Mental health issues are real and need a cultural mind shift asap.

Shame that Lemming's comments seem to have been ignored, I think he's made a lot of sense here.

In reply to Blizzard: I think politicians of all hues are contemptible shitbags for many reasons, but raising or highlighting worthwhile issues isn't one of them.
dissonance - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to Toby S:

> Shame that Lemming's comments seem to have been ignored, I think he's made a lot of sense here.

yup, think only choice would be to delete out the politican bit and redo it as a new thread.
ads.ukclimbing.com
stroppygob - on 30 Oct 2012
In reply to Toby S:
> (In reply to The Lemming)
> [...]
>
> [...]
>
> Shame that Lemming's comments seem to have been ignored, I think he's made a lot of sense here.

While his points have some merit, they do not, I think, represent what is accurate in today's society.

As I say above;

> After 28+ years working in mental health I can honestly say the level of public awareness and understanding of mental illness is at it's highest level ever, and successive governments have worked to promote, and funded health promotion, on the matter.

> For Milliband to start acting like it's some blinding insight of his which he has been so benevolent to share with us, is nauseating.


This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.