/ Road ID Bracelets

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yorkshireman - on 31 Oct 2012
I'm mucking about on one of the current challenges on Strava and this one is run by RoadID. I'd never heard of them before but looked up their website, and it seems they specialise in selling ID tags for bikers and runners, so in case you get hit by a truck or fall and knock yourself unconscious you have something handy for someone who finds you to contact the relevant people.

http://www.roadid.com/c/RoadID

Useful precaution that you would consider, or pointless trinket cashing in on a risk averse society?

tony on 31 Oct 2012
In reply to yorkshireman:

Seems a slightly OTT solution to a real issue. I don't cycle that much to have need of one of these, but I do run in the hills around where I live, and I quite often have no personal ID on me. I'll sometimes have my phone, but other than that, I'd have no identification.

I really should do something about it.
yorkshireman - on 31 Oct 2012
In reply to yorkshireman:

I forgot to mention - if you fancy one, and you're on Strava - run 50 miles this week and you'll get a $10 voucher.

http://app.strava.com/challenges/road-id-lace-em-up-challenge
Blinder - on 31 Oct 2012
In reply to yorkshireman: Never worked out the point of them really. Only work relay if I am sat in a hospitial in a coma. Just speeds up my family finding out. Not going to make me any better.
PeterM - on 31 Oct 2012
In reply to yorkshireman:

Print out one or more of these and fill them in:

http://www.medids.com/free-id.php

I've got one in my wallet and one for cycling/running.
1step2far - on 31 Oct 2012
In reply to yorkshireman: I've got one. Very useful if the worst (Or almost worst) happens. Especially if you're out on your own. Yes it's unlikely that you'll need it but it's worth it for peace of mind. (IMHO)
gizmo - on 31 Oct 2012
In reply to yorkshireman:

I got something similar from http://www.iceid.co.uk/ , mainly for when I'm running and I rarely have anything more personal than a house key on me.

I do carry a laminated ICE card that my bike club produces when out on the bike, but I figured that one of these would be quicker to spot.
DancingOnRock - on 01 Nov 2012
In reply to yorkshireman: Anyone remember these? http://www.sostalisman.co.uk/ Lots of people had them in the 80s.
jkarran - on 01 Nov 2012
In reply to yorkshireman:

Pointless trinket cashing in on a risk averse society.

steelbru - on 01 Nov 2012
In reply to jkarran:
I think they're a good idea - low cost for something that you will probably never use, but could save your life.

You put your blood type, any known allergies, etc on it ( as well as contact details to let friends know ).

Coincidentally, about a week after I ordered one, a friend from my running club collapsed in the hills, he had no id with him, he woke up in hospital hours later and they still han't worked out who he was.
jkarran - on 01 Nov 2012
In reply to steelbru:

How could it save your life?

If you need blood you'll be tested for type. If you have dangerous allergies then fine, carry something but most people don't.

You could make a stronger argument for it potentially saving someone else's life if you were to die before you'd been identified.

jk
Jim Hamilton - on 01 Nov 2012
In reply to steelbru:
> Coincidentally, about a week after I ordered one, a friend from my running club collapsed in the hills, he had no id with him, he woke up in hospital hours later and they still han't worked out who he was.

so it's a good thing he didn't have an id bracelet ! - he saved his friends the worry of being unconscious in hospital.
Tall Clare - on 01 Nov 2012
In reply to jkarran:

To provide another perspective - if my partner keeled over whilst out running or on his bike, got taken off to hospital and I didn't know where he was, I'd be really worried. I think carrying some sort of ID can't harm.
jkarran - on 01 Nov 2012
In reply to Tall Clare:

I'm not suggesting it does any harm. I'm just saying you don't need shiny bracelets for ID and for people without serious allergies (in the UK at least) the probability of surviving an accident/illness probably isn't altered by initial anonymity.

jk
System Shaper on 01 Nov 2012
In reply to yorkshireman:

$20 seems steep, I got some custom printed dog tags for about 3 with all the relevant information I need on them which are a lot cheaper than the purpose made solutions you get, and possibly lighter weight too? (Not that there'd be anything in it really).

I wear them all the time to be fair, especially when cycling or climbing as I do have a medical condition that people would defiantly need to know about if something did happen, even if it was just heading across the street to the shops. So in my case no, not necessarily cashing in on a risk averse society but certainly providing a more expensive way to solve a problem which already has a solution.
Jamming Dodger on 01 Nov 2012
In reply to yorkshireman: After my last episode yesterday where i was in sole charge of a six year old, im definitely going to consider getting a bracelet for identification (and indication of why im lying on the floor twitching like someone possessed)and it will double up for any occasion where im splatted by a car whilst out on the bike.
Jamming Dodger on 01 Nov 2012
In reply to gizmo: Yeah as far as im aware paramedics are trained to check for wrist bands on people found unconscious.
3leggeddog on 01 Nov 2012
In reply to yorkshireman:

I have always thought that tattooing is the answer here. Blood type etc are tested for but allergies and medical conditions could be tattooed in a discreet place (best if standardised so medics know where to look). The tattoo could also carry organ donation requests or refusals.

You can go out and forget your card, bracelet, necklace but not your tattoo.
3leggeddog on 01 Nov 2012
In reply to 3leggeddog:

Or a microchip like those used for pets
Simon Wells - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to Jamming Dodger:

Yep checking for medi alerts is a standard part of our ITC Outdoor First Aid courses. Next one is the 19th - 20th of Dec at Reaseheath College. 16 hours Outdoor First Aid for remote, rural and urban areas, ie different ways of dealing with problems in Sainsburys car park to the top the Ben.

simon.wells@reaseheath.ac.uk if interested.
The New NickB - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to jkarran:

I would not make any argument for life saving, but I don't have any conditions that could be made worse by carrying out treatment without seeing my medical records.

I do however live alone with a dog, which I would hate to starve to death whilst I was in a coma in hospital, or even dead.

I would also hate for my friends and family to think that I had just suddenly disappeared.

They do solve a problem, it is a problem that can be solved in other ways, but that applies to lots of things.
miko1404 on 02 Jan 2013
I have worn this wristband for a few years - you also get tags to attach to belongings too. Gives my wife more reassurance when I zoot off into the wilderness!

http://www.cram-alert.co.uk/
The New NickB - on 02 Jan 2013
In reply to jkarran:
> (In reply to yorkshireman)
>
> Pointless trinket cashing in on a risk averse society.

Depends on your personal circumstances. I would like my loved ones to know quickly if I am in a coma or death. I also wouldn't want my dog to starve to death, simply because I was unable to feed her.

Lots of solutions to this, this is one.
The New NickB - on 02 Jan 2013
In reply to miko1404:
> I have worn this wristband for a few years - you also get tags to attach to belongings too. Gives my wife more reassurance when I zoot off into the wilderness!
>
> http://www.cram-alert.co.uk/

If I remember rightly Steve Cram's brother was killed by a car whilst out running and the family did not know for days.

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