/ should you accept youre getting old ...?

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colina - on 03 Nov 2012
ok so im 53, mid life chrisis maybe..started climbing/mountaineering 5 years ago,now learning to box..who am i trying to kid?
all my friends think ive got a screw loose and should just get on with accepting that isnt what people of my age do .
sometimes i think why bother pushing myself,just get fat, watch tv take the dog out for its walk and accept that im getting on and be like everyone else.
anyone got any thoughts on getting older?
hokkyokusei - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

No:

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
Roberttaylor - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: Buy a racing bike, seems to be the done thing.

Robert (age 22 and 1/2) so no idea about MLCs.
johncook - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: Don't accept getting old. If you want to do something, however infantile (as long as it is legal) go do it. At 63 I am back climbing and leading VS/HVS and expecting to improve on that next year when the weather gets better (if it does). Try anything, if you enjoy it keep doing it, if not, don't. I will still be doing things, not considered sensible for someone of my age,right up to the day they screw down the lid!
Pursued by a bear - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

> anyone got any thoughts on getting older?

It's better than the alternative, as Dave Allan once observed.

The body may age but as long as your mind stays young, nimble and open to new opportunity you'll be fine. By those standards I've met people in their twenties who have already become senior citizens.

T.
I like climbing - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
Forget age and just climb. Simple as that and ignore the idiots that keep reminding themselves and everybody else that they are too old to do what they are doing. They'll talk themselves into an early grave and you, if you're smart will be climbing, boxing and having fun.
I'm off climbing now and btw I'm older than you.....
NIGBEE on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

Yes you have to accept getting old but that is not the same thing as giving up or not trying something because it interests you

I am only 45 and climb and ride bikes. I am still trying to improve my standard at both but I do accept that the gains are smaller and harder to get but they are still gains

Various things like recovery times and injurys take longer as you get older, this you have to accept but it should not stop you trying

My dad is 76 and is still trying to improve with his road biking
Simon4 - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

> all my friends think ive got a screw loose and should just get on with accepting that isnt what people of my age do .

They are wrong!

> anyone got any thoughts on getting older?

Carry on climbing, skiing, Alpinism, but do take precautions.

You can still do what you used to do, but need more preparation beforehand and longer gaps between trips to recover. I recall a few years ago being totally shattered after climbing the Dent d'Herrens, though it was a very long day (3:30 am to 10 pm), I was much more worn out than I would have been 10 or 20 years before. Nonetheless, I still got up and down it in one piece, so can still do Alpine routes.

If you lose fitness and resilience, it is much harder to recover as you get older, but you can keep it going by continuous limited exercise. Be very aware of injuries, protect them and spend money to limit body-impact, e.g. on cable-cars, hut-meals, good lightweight gear ect. Things like tendons do get more brittle with age, so try to protect them and stop a session if they give warning - the loss of activity for 6 months if you seriously bugger yourself will set you back far more than finishing a wall session half an hour earlier than intended.

If you do get soft-tissue injuries, pay for physios etc to get something done about them, don't just assume they will get better of their own. If they do it will be much slower than with help, and recovery will in any case be getting ever slower.

The Pylon King on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

Its the other people that have been conditioned/brainwashed.

Do whatever you enjoy doing.
tlm - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

53 is young in the Climbers Club, Alpine Club or Fell and Rock Club. Plenty of people of 53 and older climb - there are thousands of them out there! I know people in their 80's who are climbing and biking...
Postmanpat on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
>
> anyone got any thoughts on getting older?

Yup, you only get one shot at life. Squeeze as much out of it as you can.

Tom1878 - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:


NEVER accept your too old! Do not take any notice of you couch potato friends!

I played football until I was 39. Then Rugby Union until 47. Started mountaineering age 52(mainly hiking, scrambling,some low grade climbing).Trained for 10 weeks and entered a white collar boxing event aged 55 and beat a 42 year old opponent in front 44 family and friends. The whole experience was a great buzz. The atmosphere was fantastic! Went to the Ecrins with a group of experienced friends for 8 days at age 56. It was the hardest thing Iv`e ever done. I`d never pushed myself to that level before. In hindsight, I should have been fitter, but I`d love to go back. I`m now 57, and have plans to keep pushing myself onto more adventures.

However, I do suffer from numerous aches and pains, weakish lower back, sore bunion on my left big toe. It is definately harder to maintain a high level of fitness and recovery is a lot slower. But it`s worth it!!

My body will give in before my mind gives up!

By the way, nearly everyone I know thinks I`m nuts as well.




teh_mark - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

'We do not stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing'.
Andrew Smith - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: Never accept you are getting old, just accept your limitations and strive towards them with as much gusto as you did when you were 21. 53 is the new 21 and I have another 9 years to go yet!. It was quite encouraging though, when my new road bike came, and my 9 year old son said,'wow that's a really nice bike Dad, I think if you try hard enough, you might be in the next Olympics'. Bless him, he was being serious as well, I just turned to him and said 'I don't think so, even if I was still 21'.
Andrew Smith - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to Andrew Smith: Just to follow on though, it won't stop me trying!
owlart - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: Getting older is unavoidable, growing up is optional!
goatee - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: I'm 50 and I have every intention of getting fitter than I have ever been. I intend to continue to go to the Alps for at least the next fifteen years if all goes well. I do adventure races, cycle and run marathons. I was a fat slob in my twenties and thirties. As we get older we can see more clearly that there is an inevitable end...but not yet. Enjoy everything to the max. Oh and I have started taking Whey Protien. It really does help with recovery times.
Stanners - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
53!? Don't start making excuses as to why you shouldn't be doing anything half interesting until your 70. :D (at 70 your fecked from then onwards) ;)
IanMcC - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
Only 7 years left to train (and learn Spanish?)
http://edumarin.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/8b-los-60-anos.html
colina - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to Tom1878:
> (In reply to colina)
>
>
> NEVER accept your too old! Do not take any notice of you couch potato friends!
>
> I played football until I was 39. Then Rugby Union until 47. Started mountaineering age 52(mainly hiking, scrambling,some low grade climbing).Trained for 10 weeks and entered a white collar boxing event aged 55 and beat a 42 year old opponent in front 44 family and friends. The whole experience was a great buzz. The atmosphere was fantastic! Went to the Ecrins with a group of experienced friends for 8 days at age 56. It was the hardest thing Iv`e ever done. I`d never pushed myself to that level before. In hindsight, I should have been fitter, but I`d love to go back. I`m now 57, and have plans to keep pushing myself onto more adventures.
>
> However, I do suffer from numerous aches and pains, weakish lower back, sore bunion on my left big toe. It is definately harder to maintain a high level of fitness and recovery is a lot slower. But it`s worth it!!
>
> My body will give in before my mind gives up!
>
> By the way, nearly everyone I know thinks I`m nuts as well.


my hero ! will keep up the boxing ,fancy a good scrap myself!!(you up for another fight ?!)
Thanks to all.some encouraging thoughts and stories here, will continue to push the boundaries till i fall off the perch and leave it to others to get old.!


vixen - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
Hello
have you considered changing all your friends @ :-)
colina - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to vixen: good idea 8-)
Ava Adore - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

Keeping fit keeps you young :-)
DDDD - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
I don't plan on going back to hang gliding until I'm at least 70.
I'm 53 and am still training and improving at climbing.
Don't make excuses for not having a good time.
Dave Ferguson - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
You can do wahtever you want, just face the fact you'll have to do it in beige corduroy!
Timmd on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to Tom1878: Have you thought of pilates and other exercises for your lower back? That's an impressive list by the way.
In reply to colina: Accept it - you cannot reverse time. But accepting it does not mean wasting yourtime or not doing things you want to do. I recently had a conversation with a mate about this. We are both 39, been in mountains for over 25 years. He describes himself as armchair mountaineer now. I found myslef answering that I am not even halfway through my mountaineering life yet. Age is not something to be gloomy about. Fill your time and your life in a way that maeks you happy.
deepstar - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to Dave Ferguson:
> (In reply to colina)
> You can do wahtever you want, just face the fact you'll have to do it in beige corduroy!

No you won`t, do as Jenny Joseph says,"When I am Old I shall wear Purple"!
IanMcC - on 03 Nov 2012
"In reply to deepstar:
"Purple tracksters" didn't scan so well...
Bobbsy - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to hokkyokusei:

Who is this by? Any title?

Cheers b
SouthernSteve on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to Bobbsy:
Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night
Dylan Thomas
tspoon1981 on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: This guy started running at 63, he's now 103

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fauja_Singh

Then there's this guy

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/worlds-oldest-triathlete-is-91---873573

Amazing, and slightly mental.
tspoon1981 on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to tspoon1981: 101, not 103.

I'm going senile.
l marsh - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to Stanners: Well thanks for that Stanners, that gives me just 6 months and I'm "fecked". So I'll continue my climbing (albeit at a lowish grade)- would you consider raising the ceiling to 80, cos I'm not planning on quitting yet. As long as I continue to get a buzz out of it, I won't stop, though I do agree it takes longer to recuperate after a long session, but its worth it! We are a long time dead! Make the most of what you enjoy.
the power - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: never waste a erection
arch the parch - on 03 Nov 2012
never trust a fart
andyb211 - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: 53!!!!!!! Your still a young one!! My Dad was still flying at 73 still riding his Triumph speed twin at 80 and only carked the other year on his honeymoon with Svetlana at 87!!! Mind his mistresses where not too pleased ;)

Get new friends, who climb too and have as much fun as possible.
andyb211 - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to Stanners: Try telling that to Vick T still cranking 6a on his 76th Birthday in Kalymnos!!!
ITS on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
Age is in the mind, as long as nowt nasty happens to the brain. What stops you is what happens to the body. I say keep on going until it's physically impossible. As for looks, just accept it, and grow old gracefully.
deepstar - on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to Stanners:
> (In reply to colina)
> (at 70 your fecked from then onwards) ;)

Cheers Rob,I`ve got something to look forward in 9 years!
Steph-in-the-West on 03 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

I'm 55; I climb, ski, do dog agility competitions with 1 Springer and just started training with the other. I've almost finished completely updating/redecorating my home (on my own except for plumbing, windows and electrics), finished digging a wildlife pond using only a spade and got home tonight at 23:00 after playing with my Concert Band at a Charity Concert (at which I played a solo "Gabriel's Oboe") in aid of Cornwall Air Ambulance. At Bosi in September on day 2 of a learn to lead course, a younger lad in his 30's was talking about age and looked questioningly at me. I told him I'm 55. "Bloody hell," he said. "Good on you. You're s'posed to be home watching telly!!!" Personally - I can't think of very much worse!!!
tistimetogo on 04 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

Getting? You are old. But that doesn't mean you have to lie down and drill the coffin nails from the inside. If anything it gives you more reason to do whatever it is you find interesting.

Find ways to bring out the best attitude in yourself. People around you are def a big influence. Go looking for someone with same passion/ability.

I don't want to live forever. I DO want to look back and say I feel like I did all I could.
BusyLizzie on 04 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: I started climbing and running at 48, two years ago, having never been really fit before. It has changed my life; I can't believe I'm having so much fun.

Another perspective is that in our fifties I think many people find that they have more responsibilities at work, and at home, than they have ever had before. I am better now at handling stress (and I get a hell of a lot of it) than I have ever been, and I would say that's the result of the exercise I'm now getting. I suppose is it the endorphins sloshing around the system!.

A friend said to me that we are the generation that is refusing to grow old. Yippee!
stupidgirl45 on 04 Nov 2012
WTF? Why shouldn't you box or climb etc just because you're 53? I didn't realise there was an age limit on it :P
Maybe you need some new friends!

Do what you enjoy doing, it's much better to stay fit and healthy than stagnate in front of the tv.

Stanners - on 04 Nov 2012
In reply to l marsh:
80...I meant 80... :) Of course there is no limit, I intend to be carried out of my wheelchair at 95 in order to put on a base jumping suit. I think realistically death is the biggest stopper to our climbing careers. Climb till you drop lads, have fun!
Ciro - on 04 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

You're still pretty young. After several days of projecting, I onsighted my first 7b a couple of years back. Half an hour later, a 62 year old woman walked up and onsighted it. According to her husband she could still redpoint 8a.
jcw on 04 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: This summer we were a rope of three totaling 238 doing multi pitch 5b/c at Vallorcine, the leader is now 82 and I was the youngest at 78. It is easier to keep relatively fit climbing or skiing than fell walking or biking (and in my humble opinion infinitely more fun).
Ian65 - on 04 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: I believe it was Nelson Mandela that observed 'age is just a number, being old is a state of mind'.

At 51 I am now climbing as hard (if not harder) than I ever have done in 35 years of climbing.

Enjoy - that's the key in my view.
colina - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to jcw: respect !8-)
GridNorth - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: I climbed my hardest grades F7a and E4 when I was 55 to 57. At 64 putting in the same effort does not unfortunately provide the same returns now. I seem to be stuck on E2 and F6b. If I train harder I feel a little too prone to injury.

John
ripper - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: if your friends ask about the climbing and boxing, tell them that apart fromt the obvious physical fitness benefits, the hand/eye and total body co-ordination required, and the whole mental workout, is forcing your brain to work overtime and create new neural pathways, which might help keep your mind firing on all cylinders into the twilight years when they'll be happily dribbling mashed potato and ice cream down their chins...
Michael Porter - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: My Dad is 59 tomorrow and is climbing harder than he has ever before, first E2 on grit earlier this year and numerous E1's including a couple in Wadi Rum in April. Why can't you be active and enjoying sport and the outdoors for many years to come?

My gran parents are 86 and 87, they both still enjoy a round of golf, although they prefer a buggy now but still its inspiring!

I hope to lead climb into my 80's (if I make it) and if you are healthy there is no reason why you can't.

Michael
GridNorth - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to Mikey P:
Why can't you be active and enjoying sport and the outdoors for many years to come?
>
Because after a while it begins to hurt after every session and you question if it is worth it. You can of course continue at lower grades but, to be honest, to some people that's just not as satisfying. I've not made my mind up about that yet. :-(

abcdefg - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

Of course you have to accept getting old, which is the question in your subject: that's just a biological fact. But 'age' itself doesn't have any effect on what you *want* to do.

If you enjoy climbing, keep at it. If you don't, pack it in: we won't mind.

If you're looking for inspiration: Riccardo Cassin celebrated the 50th anniversary of the first ascent of the North Face of the Piz Badile by repeating the route, at the age of 78.

Kipper - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

One of my old climbing partners is mid fifties and out climbing 8a and above every weekend.

I'm a similar age, but not climbing the same numbers.
Eric9Points - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

I think the only thing you have to accept as you get older is that certain types of clothing, such as that rag you've got stuck on your head in your profile pic, make you look ridiculous.

I was 54 a month ago, I did a half marathon in 1:43 yesterday and will be heading off to the gym in few minutes. I feel ten years younger than I did two years ago.

abcdefg - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to Eric9Points:

> I think the only thing you have to accept as you get older is that certain types of clothing, such as that rag you've got stuck on your head in your profile pic, make you look ridiculous.

Have a heart! He might be trying to keep the sun off his bald patch!
Eric9Points - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to abcdefg:
> (In reply to Eric9Points)
>
> [...]
>
> Have a heart! He might be trying to keep the sun off his bald patch!

You're right I was being an arse. Apologies to the OP.
stroppygob - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

I'm also 53. I wish to enjoy whatever lifespan I have left to the fullest. I make efforts to ensure I can and do. Why not? What is there to be gained by; "why bother pushing myself,just get fat, watch tv take the dog out for its walk and accept that im getting on and be like everyone else."

Surely that is just guaranteeing you will get less out of life?
Shani - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

There is no age limit on curiosity. Go where it takes you. Life enrichment is a noble pursuit.
Duncan Bourne - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
Give up climbing? Why you are just getting to your prime! Join the Alpine club and be one of the youngsters
Jim Hamilton - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to ripper:
> (In reply to colina) if your friends ask about the climbing and boxing, tell them that apart fromt the obvious physical fitness benefits, the hand/eye and total body co-ordination required, and the whole mental workout, is forcing your brain to work overtime and create new neural pathways, which might help keep your mind firing on all cylinders into the twilight years when they'll be happily dribbling mashed potato and ice cream down their chins...

if it goes wrong with the boxing it may be the op dribbling mashed potato and ice cream...
ripper - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to Jim Hamilton:
> (In reply to ripper)
> [...]
>
> if it goes wrong with the boxing it may be the op dribbling mashed potato and ice cream...

True - but I was assuming 'learning to box' doesn't include professional (ie no headguard) bouts...
Mike Mead - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor:

+1 to all above. I just turned 51 and climbing harder and better than ever.

Fitness is one thing, but don't forget a chap also needs an electric guitar and an amp with lots of distortion.

Mike
Simon Alden - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: Definitely never give up. My current inspiration is Stevie Haston who's still climbing VERY hard at 55. Age is no excuse for not climbing hard it all boils down to my own motivation and energy. So defnitely I intend going for it as long as I can and try to ignore my age which is just a number after all..am 50 in January btw :o
GridNorth - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to coverdale: It's difficult to generalise. My mate gave up at 66 because after many years of quite hard climbing his fingers were giving him a lot of pain. He is a musician and decided it would be more beneficial to concentrate on that before his hands gave out altogether. I'm 64 and have to be very carefull especially on fingery indoor routes which seems to be very intense.
Jim C - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
> > anyone got any thoughts on getting older?

Just back from a trip up Glen Etive on a club meet, some members still active in their 70's and they were heading up various snowy Corbetts and Munros coming down in the dark with headtorches, and then still got energy to socialise late into the night.

I too am 53 , and I'm looking to join them doing the same in my 70's, you should too.
MarkL - on 06 Nov 2012
51.

I started of hiking in my teens, took up rock climbing in my twenties.
Took up road running in my mid twenties to keep the weight down for climbing.
The road running got me into fell running.

I had my mid-life crisis a bit early and had quite a few years off drinking and smoking fags.

Took up mountain biking in my 40s. Really enjoyable but not keen on the boys with toys attitude.

Took up running again in late 40s when my daughter joined the local running club. At 49 completed the Bob Graham Round. At 50 took to ultra running seriously and frequently beat the youths to finish in the top ten of 30, 40 and 50 mile races. I'm the fittest and lightest that I've ever been.

I take my daughter to the climbing wall occasionally, though I've not climbed for a decade. I'm just getting the first stirrings of, "If I put the training in, maybe, just maybe I could get myself up Cave Route at Gordale." And I reckon I could!
Denzil - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: Started sea kayaking in my early 50's, to save a little bit on wear and tear. Over the last 7 years I've kayaked various places in Scotland (including through Corryvrecken), as well as Alaska, Greenland and Norway. New Zealand next Jan for a month, backpacking and kayaking. Still mountaineering - Himalayan trip in 2015. Just keep doing things!
don.husband on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
> ok so im 53, mid life chrisis maybe..started climbing/mountaineering 5 years ago,now learning to box..who am i trying to kid?
> all my friends think ive got a screw loose and should just get on with accepting that isnt what people of my age do .
> sometimes i think why bother pushing myself,just get fat, watch tv take the dog out for its walk and accept that im getting on and be like everyone else.
> anyone got any thoughts on getting older?

hi i am 65 this month and intend to carry on climbing and walking far as long as poss,accepting you're age does not mean you stop living , i am kinder to my knees these days and no longer run down the hill ,but apart from that!!!! so go for it!!!
almost sane - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
I know folks in their fifties and sixties who get paid to lead expeditions, in places from Central America to Africa to the Himalayas. Indeed, I am one of them.
I am aged 52, due to lead an expedition to Costa Rica and Nicaragua this month, lead another expedition in the summer to Ladakh, hope to attempt an unclimbed peak in the Himalayas in 2013 with some friends. And I am not the oldest in the group.
AlunP - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

You need to think laterally.

Problem: At the age of 57 my carbon fibre bicycle was slowing down.

Solution: I took some lessons and now I have a new bit of pink plastic from the DVLA allowing me to ride something that would give an F1 car, let alone Cav a run for their money. Simples :-)

The reality is that I cannot run 400 metres hurdles any more but that doesn't stop me deploying my rubbish climbing abilities in a gully or an iced up ridge. Or riding motorbikes around in the third world. Or lots of other nonsense.

Daytime TV? I'd rather go to Dignitas.





auldscotal - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

Always glad to be any age I am/ was most of the time.

When I'm 64 (now!) I'm still out ski touring, white water paddling & doing 90 mile hilly Sportives on the bike, and best of all enjoying it. So I accept ageing is part of life, but just delight in the stuff I can do.
cham4807 - on 06 Nov 2012
As 2 of my favourite saying's go,

"It's better to look back and think about the things you have done than think about the things you haven't done"

And,

"Those who believe they can and those who believe they can't are both right"
nniff - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

the combined age of the occupants in the car going up to do the OMM the weekend before last was comfortably over 200. If the eldest decides to crack on a bit, all I can do is watch him go!

So, no intention of accepting it. I need an MRI scan of my knee to see what's not working properly in there, but I should be down at the wall tomorrow night, 3 hours on the bike on Thursday (if it's not tipping down)
Timmd on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to nniff:

I know a guy who is nearly 70 who is really hill fit, if you keep on walking it seems like you can just keep on walking, if you see what I mean.
Robert Durran - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

Obviously you have to accept getting physically older - more time needed for recovery, more care over injury avoidance - but some people just seem to develop an "old" attitude (this can happen from about 30 years onwards it seems); they are the ones always looking for excuses and talking about what they used to be able to do rather than what they plan to do. Personally, I've found that, as I haver got older, there is more I want to do and more urgency to actually do it; at 48 I have every intention of going on getting stronger and ideally fitter so that I can do the stuff I want to do. I have, however, had to come to terms with being less bold/stupid than I used to be.
DaveAtkinson - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to Robert Durran:?
Are you only 48 Robert? When I climbed with you 20 years back I thought you were 48 then.

You must be living proof of the anti-ageing properties of climbing. Never mind Oil of Olay. Get on the rock.

Maybe it was the beard?

PS
I Enjoyed the poetry earlier in the thread. Clearly stopping climbing for a while brings on ageing.
ian caton on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

This is all far more interesting than news of what youths get up to.

So what's the oldest anybody has been when they onsigted their first E6?

Robert Durran - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to ian caton:
> So what's the oldest anybody has been when they onsigted their first E6?

I don't know, but I shall be at least 49. Same goes for 8a redpoint and VII - unless I get one in early season!

Robert Durran - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to DaveAtkinson:
> (In reply to Robert Durran)?
> Are you only 48 Robert? When I climbed with you 20 years back.....

Remind me - the one thing I have noticed about getting older is that I never have the faintest idea who anyone is any more!

>... I thought you were 48 then.
> You must be living proof of the anti-ageing properties of climbing.

If you thought I looked 48 when I was only 28, surely that is proof of the premature ageing effect of climbing!
ian caton on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to Robert Durran:
> (In reply to ian caton)
> [...]
>
> I don't know, but I shall be at least 49. Same goes for 8a redpoint and VII - unless I get one in early season!


49 is young. There has to be somebody way older than that.

DaveAtkinson - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to Robert Durran:

Ha. Aberdeen circa 1990. Steve Helmore, Jon Ashdown, Keith Milne, Alistair Robertson etc. I gave up not long after and headed west.

Good to see you going well.

Dave

Are you sure about the 48?
Robert Durran - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to ian caton:
> (In reply to Robert Durran)
> 49 is young.

Indeed!

> There has to be somebody way older than that.

Almost certainly.

Robert Durran - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to DaveAtkinson:
> (In reply to Robert Durran)
>
> Ha. Aberdeen circa 1990

Ah yes!

> Are you sure about the 48?

Certain!

SimonM1 - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

I noticed that a couple of years ago that the lift pass is free to over 80s at kitzbuhel, I am aiming to take full advantage of such offers when the time comes
tocall - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
> ok so im 53, mid life chrisis maybe..started climbing/mountaineering 5 years ago,now learning to box..who am i trying to kid?


Let them get old on their own, I'm also 53 and started climbing 2 years ago and love it, I also do mountain biking and Moto cross and have just started training with the local roller derby team , my family and friends think the same as yours, but it keeps me young !
Just go for it and have fun doing what you wanna do, there's plenty of years down the line to sit back in your armchair and reminisce

dwoodhead - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: a fantastic thread! Of course not, but I understand the problem - as a 56 yo I get the same reaction having got back into indoor climbing, started leading, winter climbing and taken up riding a motor bike including track days. The problem is that if you forget to do these things when you are much younger all sorts of other things (like mortgages, kids etc.) come along and delay the opportunity, so one has no choice but to appear slightly odd and start later in life. Have fun!
Andy Hemsted - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

At the World Vet Orienteering Champs there are usually two or three 90-year-olds competing.

Me? I'm going to have my mid-life-crisis when I'm 75....
simon cox - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

Hi Colina, I am "just 50", always climbed and more recently got into fell running including Bob Graham and Paddy Buckley 24 hr challenges AND like yourself viewed as having a screw loose - we ARE different - sanity is much over rated - go for it!

Also as you get older I think you get relatively better at endurance stuff - so Wendy Dodds (61) recent completion of the Dragon's Back multi day fell run over Wales... another lady (61) in the USA did her first 100 miler in 21 hours something... should be sources of inspiration.

In terms of climbing get on the bolder stuff, I reckon the older you get the less you have to lose...

Some advice from Danton...

"il nous faut de l'audace, et encore de l'audace, et toujours de l'audace""We need audacity, and yet more audacity, and always audacity!"

Enjoy,
Goucho on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: As the rather cheesy song says 'fairy tales can come true, it can happen to you, when you're young at heart'

Age is just a number on a piece of paper.

After a few years sabbatical, and heading for the wrong side of 55, I'm back enjoying a second (or possibly third) wind in my climbing, and still managing to crank out around E4 and F7a/b - although admittedly, the recovery process takes longer now.

I've got a couple of projects planned for this winter in the alps, and also the Haute Route, and next year looking forward to a few weeks back in Yosemite, where I would hope to get a few 5.11's done, and maybe even a couple of big wall routes which I never got round to in my youth.

Basically, as long as I'm enjoying myself, and my body (and Mrs Goucho) allows me, I'm going to carry on behaving like a big kid, with a big grin on my face.

Pete Pozman - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: I retired this summer at 60 and immediately went to the Dolomites to have a go at Via Ferrata for the first time. Climbed non stop for 10 days and got back into multi pitch alpine rock climbs. I'm leading VS 5a and 6a+ at the wall and came 2nd vets in the OMM C class last week.
Finally learnt the solo in High Ho Silver Lining and bought a new distortion pedal for my Fender.
That being said I wouldn't feel so absolutely knackered if I didn't spend so long in the pub.

Now of my three score year and ten
Sixty will not come again
And take from seventy years three score
That only leaves me ten more!

And since to look at things in bloom
Ten springs is little room
About the woodlands I will go
To see the cherry hung with snow

( Sic With apologies to AE Houseman "A Shropshire Lad")
NeilMac - on 07 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
A friend's father was up Buachaille Etive Mor recently and he's 33 years your senior.

If you can, do. Your attitude will see you living longer and happier.

Paul Troon - on 07 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: Yep keep going my dad was fit at 40 year then stopped walking now he is house bound. For me got into climbing late 40 now 54i keep fit and run. if i have choice of how am going to die then its drop down dead rather then sit around and wait
In reply to colina:
Yes people of your age shouldnt be climbing, wait until you get into your 60`s and 70`s ,you will climb much better
risby - on 07 Nov 2012
In reply to Stanners:
> (at 70 your fecked from then onwards) ;)

You mean I have to stay celibate until then ???

sheila johnson - on 07 Nov 2012
In reply to Last Thursday:
> (In reply to colina)
> Yes people of your age shouldnt be climbing, wait until you get into your 60`s and 70`s ,you will climb much better

50 something is YOUNG. I started climbing in my 60's and though I'll never be brilliant, and my fingers arent so strong, I love it and wont stop until I just cant do it anymore. I cycle too and plan to do that indefinitely even though Im probably slower on the hills.

nniff - on 07 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

ON of the local glossy comics dropped through our door the other day. It had an article by Marcus Brigstock in it. He recounted the tale of how he asked a 70-something year old woman what she would change if she could. She said she'd raise the age of consent to 47 because it would increase her chances!
Ava Adore - on 07 Nov 2012
In reply to Last Thursday:

Great response! :-)
pepperpot - on 07 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

At the risk of sounding stupid in front of all the 50/60 somethings that have replied here so far but I've been really struggling to deal with turning 40 in 2011. Over the past two years I seem to have lost the enthusiasm to get out there and I've not been able to shake the unsettling feeling of lethargy. Its as if someone flicked a switch to a big neon sign in my head that says "its too late".

Anyhow, after reading this thread I've realised that thinking like this is just a load of boll*cks and I need buck my ideas up!

mick.h on 07 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

Respect. I quit boxing at 28, I was getting battered by 16 year olds.
Nigel Modern on 07 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: To OP:

Accept getting old, no; respect your current limits, yes.
Cruty Rammers - on 08 Nov 2012
"You are never too old until regrets start taking the place of dreams"
colinakmc - on 12 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: Wot a great thread. No you haven't got a screw loose (tho the boxing'll fix that soon) just keep going for it. I'm 61 on Wednesday and I run, mountain bike, hillwalk, climb a bit (always been crap at it - current project is to lead Grade IV and VS by next summer!)and still aspire to collecting 4000m Alpine peaks. Currently trying to persuade the boss that I need a road bike. As someone else said, much better to drop off your perch having completed a classic multi pitch climb than shuffling round a shopping mall like the rest of the Undead.

One friend's father asked for a new rucksack for his 80th birthday and was still scrounging a winter lift to Arrochar when he was 83 -84. Keep on rockin'
tomclauk - on 12 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: At 51 I have similar thoughts but if you're fit enough to play then I think play. A restricted life, getting fat, watching TV etc is not age appropriate at any age.
Orgsm on 12 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

If you have an active lifestyle then your fitness will only significantly drop off after you reach seventy. Regular exercise prolongs your life but also increases the healthy years. So keep it up and have fun whilst stacking the odds in your favour.

Mountaineering is very much what a lot of people do throughout their lifetimes, through your age, and beyond. Our clubs oldest active member is in his mid 70s and still going strong.
mrchewy - on 12 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: I spent last night in a moshpit - by far the oldest by some ten years and more than double the age of most of the kids. I ache a bit today but but so will most of them! I even took my t-shirt off, I had a grand time. I'll never stop loving being in a pit, so why should I stop? The kids gave me no quarter and treated me as a peer - why would I not go for it?
annb - on 12 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
Yesterday at the wall someone (who I don't know) complimented me on climbing well "for your age". At least, I think that's what he said, but maybe my hearing is going...
panz - on 13 Nov 2012
In reply to Last Thursday:
Hi, quite right you are.
I do not remember how long ago I was young and a climber.
Then I sat and watched TV.
At 50 I took a week off work and climbed Elbrus (about 18000 ft)in february -12 hours of a bullet hard ice and cold wind.
Then again I sat and watched TV.
At 61 I was fired from work.
So I led 7 grassrooters to 5 summits all 4200-4600 m high within very short period- between 4th and 12th in august,every day 12 hours of climbing.
I do not recollect myself doing such an exploit when young.
May be boots and gear develop faster than I m aging?
stroppygob - on 14 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: "should you accept youre getting old ...?" Never!
It's; "Should you accept you're getting old?"
colina - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:
some great stories and replies here,your thoughts have definatly got me out of my dark corner,boxing twice a week now..bring on the klitchco brothers !
MikeTS - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

At 66 I just finished a 5 day off road bike ride.
I figured out a rule. If it hurts more than the enjoyment: stop!
Bonzo5b - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: I'm 54, I'll climb with you any time just give me a shout.
Orgsm on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to MikeTS:
> (In reply to colina)
>
> At 66 I just finished a 5 day off road bike ride.
> I figured out a rule. If it hurts more than the enjoyment: stop!

Coast to coast?

Pino - on 24 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: Better living than just existing! You're not alone; keep on going.
John_Hat - on 24 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

My mother (three decades older than you) went for her first climbing session last year and loved it. She also goes to the gym every week.

I'm a bit more of a decade younger than you, and I feel my life is just starting. Far too much time in my 20's and 30's was spent doing boring things like working hard and getting to the point where we are financially comfortable, and not being able to do things because the money wasn't there, now its playtime!

John

Age 39 and three quarters.
Stone Idol - on 24 Nov 2012
In reply to John_Hat: My mate Roger (1 arm, dodgy ankle, somewhere N of 70) is still super fit, swims in the local harbour and goes climbing. Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional - get out there
Al Evans on 24 Nov 2012
In reply to John_Hat: The worst thing is getting old and getting depression at the same time, that really knocks you off your perch. I know I can't beat getting old, but I hope still to beat depression and start doing stuff again.
Trangia - on 24 Nov 2012
In reply to colina:

I'm approaching three decades older than you and certainly do not feel old. You don't have to accept getting old, age is just a number.
In reply to Trangia:
>
>
> I'm approaching three decades older than you and certainly do not feel old. You don't have to accept getting old, age is just a number.

I don't really follow 'not accepting getting old' - how can you 'not accept' a simple fact?

And age is just a number, for sure, the number of years you have been around!


Chris
ads.ukclimbing.com
Trangia - on 24 Nov 2012
In reply to Chris Craggs:

Depends what you mean by "accepting"? As I say age is just a number and of course I accept the fact that I am fast approaching my three score years and ten, but I don't accept that that means I have to change my habits and way of life so as to "conform" with what society "expected" of a 70 year old. A lot of the aging process is in the mind, obviously you have no control over deterioratring health issues, but there is nothing to stop you living life to the full, and maintaining a positive outlook. i've noticed a tendancy for some people of my generation to give up on outdoor activities, not because they have failing health, but merely because they are "getting older". I find that an appallingly negative attitude.
Stone Idol - on 24 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: Of course, there is the other side of this. I have friends and acquaintances who are still cranking out 6b despite being past 60. Plenty of us don't do that due to arthritis and other associated problems from a lifetime of pulling on tinies (and the beer takes its inevitable toll as well). Still, it means that you meet your old self going backwards and have the chance to collect all those Diffs that you did not do on the way up when you were grade grabbing. Of course, if you are just starting you accept the drawbacks and go enjoy anyway - my oldest client, when I was taking folk out on the hill, was over 72 and could climb VS no problem.
PATTISON Bill - on 24 Nov 2012
In reply to colina: I accept approaching my 79th birthday whilst enjoying my sixth week climbing and walking in Costa Del Sol,still managing and enjoying 5sand 6sand 6bs at Keswick wall Age creates problems but its not an excuse to sit and vegetate in front of the telly.Get out there and do it ,life isnt a rehearsal for something.You only get one chance make the most of it. Having survived 3 life threatening experiences I will happily accept any extra years that come my way.
Al Randall on 24 Nov 2012
In reply to PATTISON Bill: Respect. I'm going to have to stop using my 64 years as an excuse now. Damn you. ;-)

Al

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