/ how many of you.....

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AdCo82 on 05 Nov 2012
......change your baselayer after the walk in and before you start your winter climb and who doesn't bother?
Pursued by a bear - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to An Triubhas: I don't. Mind you, I don't dress for dinner either. And though I do wear a tie whilst climbing, it's there as a leash for my chalk bag. Standards have slipped...

T.
Dave Kerr - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to An Triubhas:

I do. Bracing isn't it?
Dave Kerr - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to Dave Kerr:

So bracing in fact that I usually have somewhere handy to hang my jacket whilst I change.
rocky57 - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to An Triubhas:

I do, but only to impress the girls.
Merlin - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to An Triubhas:

Is there much point? Or is it just the momentary feel of dry clothing next to the skin?
remus - on 05 Nov 2012
In reply to Merlin: Means you dont have to endure that minging period where your soaking base layer cools down as you stand around at the bottom of the route.
r0x0r.wolfo - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to An Triubhas: If your base layer is soaked then you have dressed too warm for the walkin.
mrchewy - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo: Yep.
CurlyStevo - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo: i run quite hot and sweaty but seem to be able to wear the right layers for for the walkin that i dont need to change my base layer. i'll add that im not a big fan of merino as i find it soaks up sweat too much and gets damp unlike man made fibres.
Dave Kerr - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo:
> (In reply to An Triubhas) If your base layer is soaked then you have dressed too warm for the walkin.

If your base layer is dry then you must be moving pretty slowly.
neuromancer - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to Dave Kerr:
Watch out, we've got a badass over here.

Or alternatively, you could have selected any number of macho responses, here's a few for next time!

Your pack was under-loaded.

You forgot your weight training belt.

You reslung with dyneema and so your rack was lighter.

Not enough large hexes.

Your walkin was easier.

My penis is larger than yours.
jkarran - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo:

> If your base layer is soaked then you have dressed too warm for the walkin.

I'd sweat standing still in a fridge let alone slogging up a mountain with a heavy pack. Some people run warmer than others.
jk
eltankos - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to neuromancer:
Also
"You wear a baselayer?"
Robbo1 - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to An Triubhas: This feels like a dangerous forum to post on but I'll risk it.

I used to change my baselayer but this year I have (i) made an effort to get fitter and (ii) bought one of the Brynje string vests. So far I have only used the vest when cycling but it does an amazing job of curing that wet baselayer feeling that drove me to change my baselayer at the bottom of climbs.
beardy mike - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to An Triubhas: I do. I never used to but now find it so much more comfortable once i've changed. I sweat lots anyway even when I've been fit, so the "you're not fit enough" "you've dressed too warmly theories are unfortunatly just as macho as the "you're not going fast enough" one. I've done it both ways and prefer the momentary erect nipples so that I'm not starting at a deficit when I'm stood waiting for the leader to climb the first pitch...
jonnie3430 - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to Robbo1:
>
> the Brynje string vests. So far I have only used the vest when cycling but it does an amazing job of curing that wet baselayer feeling that drove me to change my baselayer at the bottom of climbs.

It would amuse me immensely if the winter climbing population wore these for the walkin! The scottish winter reputation would go through the roof if a photo got out to the conti's of a pile of folk getting to the stretcher in their string vests in the snow!

I don't change, but don't sweat much either.
r0x0r.wolfo - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to Dave Kerr: If your base layer is "soaked" then you must be a unfit fat mess, or you have dressed too warm... If you're walking up a hill in a hot summer then why are you wearing a 'baselayer'.
Robbo1 - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to jonnie3430: Sorry, I should have called it a Super Thermo T-Shirt (which sounds more respectable). Don't worry - I'll keep it covered to avoid word getting out...
r0x0r.wolfo - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to mike kann: It's not macho, you can put your power 800 down jacket in your bag or tie it round your waist if you're getting too warm. Dressing so hot that you're soaking your clothes just makes you colder in the long run.
ads.ukclimbing.com
beardy mike - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo: Thanks for the patronising lesson. If you walk in in your base layer like I do and you're still sweating, then I suppose you're going to tell me I'm a fat unfit mess?
Harry Holmes - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to An Triubhas: I dont want to show everyone else up
r0x0r.wolfo - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to mike kann: What is the walkin? Is this hot or cold weather? Is your baselayer truely soaked? The wording I used in my post.
beardy mike - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo: Cold weather, to the base of tower ridge, postholing beyond the CIC, NF carpark to the hut in 1.5 hours and another 0.5 hours to the base of the ridge. I had a longsleeve base layer on, the changed into a shortsleeve base layer for the route, which I did with a wintersun jacket on and didn't particularly sweat in. Did the route in 3.5 hours, then back down Number 3 and did green gully and then walked out to get to the car at 6.30 pm.
Nick Harvey - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to An Triubhas: I do and very convinced of its benefits.
Flinticus - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to eltankos:
also
'Clothes? I climb naked (and that gives me an extra 'contact point')'
r0x0r.wolfo - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to mike kann: I guess this is just going to come under "some people walk hotter than others". Or you normally perspire under where your pack and your baselayer can't wick.

I've never been in a situation where I've soaked my clothes in sweat, unless I've been in a pretty hot environment and that is usually under my pack.

I think we just disagree what the ideas of sweating and soaked are. Of course we all perspire on a walkin, but I don't come across anyone who looks like they've just come out of a shower like you're describing.
beardy mike - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo: No, my point above if you want to reread it is that it makes you more comfortable. I'm not saying that it's an absolute no no not changing, but that you feel warm and ready for the route, rather than chilled, and expending energy to dry out your wet clothes. Regardless of how fit you are or how little you have sweated, by your own admission you sweat. Evaporating sweat out of wet clothes is purely inefficient, especially when you consider that to change costs very little extra energy. If you get off your walk in, and then stand there for 30 mintues belaying and it is reasonably cold you end up shivering, which is the bodies way of attempting to rewarm your body. I.e. you are using more energy than you need to. Alternatively you could be stood there, warm and getting ready for the pitch rather than suffering. If you're happy the way you are then crack on, but you don't need to tell people they are unfit or what clothes they are wearing when in reality you have no idea.
r0x0r.wolfo - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to mike kann: Ohh big rant here. I never said don't change your base layer, I only said that if your baselayer is truly "soaked" then you are probably wearing too much. If you look like you've just come out of the shower when you've arrived to the route you're doing something wrong. Hit the gym fatass.
dek - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo:
I agree with your point, your doing something wrong if you arrive in a winter corrie soaked in sweat. There has never been so many clothing options for mountaineers to keep their skins dry. Helly Hanson polyprop seems to out of fashion, simply because it smells?! I've. never found anything as efficient in keeping me dry. The overhyped merino 'wooly vests' on the other hand are useless for the aerobic activity of humping up big hills with a winter sac, they get wet, and stay damp, wearing a polypropylene base sorts this.
Gridded fleece ,Powerdry is also fantastic! Just pulling it out of a wash machine, you'd think it was nearly ready to wear.
Not to mention Rab VR, Marmot Dryclime etc etc
beardy mike - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo: Oh for f*ck sake, you really are an immature cock aren't you. Do what you want, I'll do what I want. When I see you in the hills I'll be nice and comfy and you'll still be a cock.
r0x0r.wolfo - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to mike kann: Look mate, no need to break the keyboard in a fit of rage.
In reply to dek:
> (In reply to r0x0r.wolfo)
> I agree with your point, your doing something wrong if you arrive in a winter corrie soaked in sweat.

This is a ridiculous discussion. If I walk up hill I get soaked in sweat. If I ride my bike at a pace that will actually get me to work, not use the work day up just riding, I get soaked in sweat. Ski touring, I've watched my wife skin up wearing a wool base layer, a 200 weight fleece, a goretex and hat, I was wearing a lifa with a pertex over it and I was getting sweaty. People are just different. It's like me saying if you don't get sweaty on the walk-in, you're walking too slow to be safe in the mountains. It's ridiculous, you're not me, your metabolism isn't the same as mine.

> Helly Hanson polyprop seems to out of fashion, simply because it smells?!

I have three lifa tops, 20 yrs, 10 yrs and 6 yrs old. All work well and I use them for cycling through winter, but as a rule by the time I get to work they are wet to the touch. I tend to rinse them out in the shower because they're drier after that and being run out, than if I just take it off. But I agree lifa is good except for the smell. For mountaineering I prefer merino, I find it is a bit slower to dry but not to the extent if causes problems and I don't hate myself due to the smell on multiday trips.

In reply to r0x0r.wolfo: Well, why do you feel the need to tell other people how their bodies should work?
beardy mike - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo: The keyboard is perfectly fine. You're the one who's saying people are unfit, don't know how to dress etc, and not taking into account pure differences in physiology. Personally to me that reaks of a bullshitter. You have no idea about how other peoples bodies behave. Just let others do what they want to do without having to be rude or immature. Your posts are typical of the dumbass posturing you get here that puts people off it.
SCC - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to TobyA:
> (In reply to r0x0r.wolfo) Well, why do you feel the need to tell other people how their bodies should work?

Because that's what keyboard warriors do Toby - but you know that!

Maybe being 20 has something to do with the need to tell people they're wrong? Maybe not though.

People are different, maybe in a few years time he'l realise that different doesn't mean wrong.

Si
r0x0r.wolfo - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to An Triubhas: In reply to TobyA:
> (In reply to r0x0r.wolfo) Well, why do you feel the need to tell other people how their bodies should work?

Sorry, only having a laugh with someone taking themselves way too seriously. I didn't mean to upset everyone who sweats on this forum ;). Never again give basic advice about layering or what not in your articles toby or you will be accused of 'telling other people how there bodies should work'. Next time I see someone wearing a down jacket in june going up dovestones edge I'll shut my mouth.

Not quite twenty anymore, lucky I don't leave my postcode up or I would have a bunch of sweaty angry people at my door.
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo:
> Never again give basic advice about layering or what not in your articles toby or you will be accused of 'telling other people how there bodies should work'.

Well, I suppose the thing about layering is you can layer to suit your own metabolism, be that sweaty or not! But I learnt long ago being overly categorical in your advice generally makes its unhelpful because we really aren't all the same.

But don't worry, somewhere out there is the perfect non-sweaty climbing partner just for you! You can march up hillsides together, hand in hand, smelling sweetly and with hardly a damp armpit between you. ;-)
r0x0r.wolfo - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to TobyA:
> (In reply to r0x0r.wolfo)
> [...]
> But don't worry, somewhere out there is the perfect non-sweaty climbing partner just for you! You can march up hillsides together, hand in hand, smelling sweetly and with hardly a damp armpit between you. ;-)

That actually sounds quite nice and romantic. Maybe I should advertise for someone like that.
beardy mike - on 06 Nov 2012
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo:
> (In reply to An Triubhas) In reply to TobyA:
> [...]
>
> Sorry, only having a laugh with someone taking themselves way too seriously.

You see there you go again. For all you know I might be Johny Vegas, and be very adept at laughing at myself. There again you'd be right about being fat and sweaty. Be good though if you could cut down on the sweeping generalisations and telling people they're wrong... tends to get peoples backs up. Hugs? Or don't you want to get sweat on you?
jkarran - on 07 Nov 2012
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo:

> If your base layer is "soaked" then you must be a unfit fat mess, or you have dressed too warm... If you're walking up a hill in a hot summer then why are you wearing a 'baselayer'.

If I was walking up a steep hill in just my baselayer and a pack on I'd be drenched, summer or winter, snow or shine. I'm no Olympian but nor am I an 'unfit mess'.

It really does puzzle me that some people struggle to understand or accept just how different other people's experience can be. I sweat a *lot* when I exercise. It's no big deal, it's not indicative of poor fitness, poor clothing or illness, I just sweat, I always have. Some people do, some people don't.

jk

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