/ Can I Keep You ?

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Pyreneenemec - on 08 Nov 2012
I watched "Casper" this evening on "Gulli" a dedicated kids TV channel here in France.
James Horner's piano theme "One Last Wish" has a haunting presence through-out the film. It is so simple, yet unexplainingly beautiful, quite similar to Elma Bernsteins "To Kill A Mocking Bird". Anyway, to cut a long story short, that awful moment arrives where Casper and Christina Ricci have "One Last Dance" and Casper whispers into her ear: "Can I keep you". Any of you who know the film will understand just how hard it is to hold back the tears at that moment. I couldn't and it's a moment that was unashamedly shared with my partner. What a couple of softies !

I can't remember all the films that have such an effect on me, but there are a few of them ! Perhaps the worse is when "Paulie" ( the parrot with the big mouth) is reunited with his owner Marie !

What do other UKC forum-users get emotional about ? Be honest and momentarily return to a time when everything was innocent and simple !
butteredfrog - on 08 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

Call of the Wild and Black Beauty!
Jim C - on 08 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: when I saved up all my hard earned pocket money , changed it into a ten bob note (remember them, worth 50p) and lost it on the way to the shops.

I wept buckets, but those were the old days when kids earned pocket money.
My kids got money for nothing, handed out by my wife.
ripper - on 08 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: Brassed Off - particularly the scene where Stephen Tompkinson, in his clown suit complete with comedy big shoes, tries to run up the street to stop bailiffs repossesing all his furniture...
Gordon Stainforth - on 08 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:
> I watched "Casper" this evening on "Gulli" a dedicated kids TV channel here in France.
> James Horner's piano theme "One Last Wish" has a haunting presence through-out the film. It is so simple, yet unexplainingly beautiful, quite similar to Elma Bernsteins "To Kill A Mocking Bird". Anyway, to cut a long story short, that awful moment arrives where Casper and Christina Ricci have "One Last Dance" and Casper whispers into her ear: "Can I keep you". Any of you who know the film will understand just how hard it is to hold back the tears at that moment. I couldn't and it's a moment that was unashamedly shared with my partner. What a couple of softies !
>
> I can't remember all the films that have such an effect on me, but there are a few of them ! Perhaps the worse is when "Paulie" ( the parrot with the big mouth) is reunited with his owner Marie !
>
> What do other UKC forum-users get emotional about ? Be honest and momentarily return to a time when everything was innocent and simple !

Gosh, in another age I worked for James Horner as his music editor once.

Hugh J - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: The Lives Of Others

Right at the end when Wiesler sees that Dreyman's book is dedicated to HGW XX/7, with gratitude - Wiesler's Stasi number.
The shop assistant asked if he wants it gift wrapped, to which Wielser replies:

"Nein. Er ist für mich."

Gets me every time.
Mooncat - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Hugh J:
> (In reply to Pyreneenemec) The Lives Of Others
>
> Right at the end when Wiesler sees that Dreyman's book is dedicated to HGW XX/7, with gratitude - Wiesler's Stasi number.
> The shop assistant asked if he wants it gift wrapped, to which Wielser replies:
>
> "Nein. Er ist für mich."
>
> Gets me every time.

+1

RockAngel on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: Dumbo, cant remember the scene in particular, but can remember sobbing into my Christmas dinner one year.

The end of Braveheart. I have to leave the room before the end because I know I'll cry, even though ive seen it about 8 times already.
rockchomper on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:
already known in my household as 'sobbalot' or 'soppydoppalus' when we watch films like 'lassie' oh, alright then, truthfully any film that grabs hold of your heart and sticks it up in your throat until you make a weird sound and have to pretend you're choking on a toffee and then kids start making gg-ffaw-hhhah noises while pretending to have too much popcorn in their mush and then we end up making bizarre animal noises and hyperventillating until tears run down our faces and we all have to run to the toilet and then we miss that bit in the film and someone rewinds it and then we watch it again and then.....
toad - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: When Midge gets the spade in Ring of Bright Water. 'cos I was young I hadn't read the book yet, so didn't see it coming
angry pirate - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:
I bawl like a baby at the end of the song "two little boys"
Gazlynn - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

Got to be ET

I can remember watching it once on a ferry crossing between nova scotia and new brunswick. There was about 50 kids looking at me as if I was daft blubbering like a baby.

I was 26!!

cheers

Gaz

Jerry67 - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: For me, amongst others, The Polar Express, when the boy rings the little bell and only he can hear it. Guaranteed blubbing every time!
Alyson - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to rockchomper:

> ...truthfully any film that grabs hold of your heart and sticks it up in your throat until you make a weird sound and have to pretend you're choking on a toffee and then kids start making gg-ffaw-hhhah noises while pretending to have too much popcorn in their mush and then we end up making bizarre animal noises and hyperventillating until tears run down our faces and we all have to run to the toilet...

Perfect description! What a great post.

I cry at Gladiator, every time. And Brokeback Mountain. And the start of Up, which is possibly the most moving opening of any film ever. Last week saw me sitting on a park bench sobbing at the ending of a book called Say Her Name by Francisco Goldman (highly recommended) and bookwise I also cried helplessly at One Day, and The Time Traveller's Wife.

In fact just this week I cried in a coffee shop (slightly embarrassing this one) at the end of Ptolemy's Gate by Johnathan Stroud which is a childrens' book ffs!

4 weeks ago my little sister went into labour at about 5pm. At 6am she was in trouble and from then til 9.30am I heard nothing. So I was sitting here at work shedding a tear or two thinking of my baby sister so tired and in so much pain, and then when her partner rang to tell me she was ok and I was auntie to a little boy I bawled uncontrollably (those proper gasping sobs where you can't speak and you go an odd shade of tomato) for about ten minutes and managed to set 4 other women off. In fact I'm crying again now just thinking about it. OH MY WORD I'M PATHETIC!
jonathan shepherd - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to toad:
> (In reply to Pyreneenemec) When Midge gets the spade in Ring of Bright Water.
I remember my mother taking me to see that when i would have been about five or six and that scene was the first i ever cried over.

Tall Clare - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

The topic of Marley and Me is a thorny one in our house. My mum read the book and wept, my stepdad read it and wept, my brother and his girlfriend came round one christmas with the DVD of it and my stepdad was mysteriously 'busy' whilst my mum, brother, his girlfriend and I wept over it... Mr TC refuses to watch it as he weeps over anything animal-ish.

The Lives of Others is the only film I can remember that made me cry.
zebidee - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

Marley and Me ... knew it was one of "those" films, but got sucked in to watching it on Film4 one night. Could see the ending a mile off but that didn't make it any easier.

Had to leave the cinema during I am Legend when get gets trapped and you just know the dog's going to get it.

Alyson - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to jonathan shepherd: The first film I remember crying at was The Black Cauldron, which was a cartoon but I seem to recall was quite dark and a bit scary, and which I've never seen since. I think a character had to sacrifice himself by diving into said cauldron, which was a bit much for my 5 year old self.

The first book I cried at was Elidor, which my mum was reading to me and she was in tears too.
Sherlock - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:
Lots of things but most recently Kashuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go,book & film.And Remains of the Day,now I think about it.
Hell,you've got me started......Cities of the Plain,A Prayer For Owen Meany. Bloody keyboard's soaking now.
Johnny_Grunwald on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

80s film, "She's having a baby" with Elizabeth McGovern and Kevin Bacon. The childbirth scene with Kate Bush's "This woman's work" playing in the background. Gets me every time and remains one of my favourite films.
deepsoup - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Alyson:
> The Time Traveller's Wife.
Argh. The last chapter of that.. I was a mess!
Haven't seen the film, if it's any good it might be better if I don't. ;O)
John_Hat - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:
>
> What do other UKC forum-users get emotional about ? Be honest and momentarily return to a time when everything was innocent and simple !

Oh, pretty much anything sad, depressing or touching. Took me three days to recover from Pan's Labyrinth.
owlart - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: At the moment, just about anything vaguely emotional will set me crying. I know I'll be crying watching any of the Rememberance day services/events over the weekend, and I don't even know anybody who was killed in war (come from a family of miners, so no-one went to the front line).

I cried when my friend called to tell me they'd had their first son. I cried when I watched the last episode of Dr Who!
rockchomper on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Alyson:
congrats on being a new auntie x ....here's some of ma wee tissues, ooh now sorry that one's a bit wet n crumpled, ya got me going as well sister ...pinkie promise you'll never watch 'watership down' with your lully lil' nephew.....'brigghhhtt eeeyess, burning like fire.....sniff!
Alyson - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to deepsoup:
> (In reply to Alyson)
> [...]
> Argh. The last chapter of that.. I was a mess!
> Haven't seen the film, if it's any good it might be better if I don't. ;O)

I didn't think the film worked as well as the book, and although I did cry it wasn't quite the full on waterworks which the book induced!
deepsoup - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Alyson:
> I didn't think the film worked as well as the book
Inevitable really I suppose. :O)
thin bob on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:
Unexpected blubbings (of happiness, btw) at sisters' weddings.
and Babe. That'll do, pig.

Charlotte's Web!
Steve John B - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: I remember crying over an Asterix book (ffs!) when I was a teenager, Obelix had to say goodbye to Dogmatix as he was going on a journey (maybe Asterix in Britain?). Not sure why I found that so sad, we'd never had a dog at that point.

It doesn't take much generally!
butteredfrog - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

Driving past sheep transporters on the motorway. Odd really considering I am definately a carnivore, am partial to a lamb chop and was raised on a sheep farm.
Ava Adore - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

I think it would be harder to list the films that HAVEN'T made me blub. I'm generally safe with action and sci fi which is why I watch those genres most. :-)
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nniff - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

I watched 'Ghost' many years ago in some stinking portacabin in the back of beyond. 30 or so blokes who'd been away from home for many months all gave a little collective sigh and had an 'I wish I were somewhere else' moment at the end.


At which point some deep gravelly voice at the back growled out 'Sentimental crap!' at which point normal servcie was resumed!
Alyson - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to owlart:
> (In reply to Pyreneenemec) At the moment, just about anything vaguely emotional will set me crying. I know I'll be crying watching any of the Rememberance day services/events over the weekend, and I don't even know anybody who was killed in war (come from a family of miners, so no-one went to the front line).

I ended up with tears running down my face at the Maritime Museum in Liverpool. The endless stories of cold watery deaths and the astonishing bravery of ordinary people, set against a constant background noise from one of the video installations of a howling gale and a raging Atlantic. There's only so much of that I can take.

> I cried when I watched the last episode of Dr Who!

I cried when Billie Piper and David Tennant did their final episode! Yikes that one was a tear-jerker.
Tall Clare - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

The new John Lewis ad has just made me feel a bit emotional. Yes, my middle name *is* mawkish sentimentality. I do love a plucky snowman though.
parberoo - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:
The scene in The Neverending Story where Artax drowns.
Here, have a link! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y688upqmRXo
I have yet to let my girls see that film. me and the missus are both haunted by it. Always have been... thanks parents.

Musically, Radical Face have a song called Family Portrait. The first time I managed to work out what he was singing about... here is a link to the lyrics, I recommend listening to it also: http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/radicalface/familyportrait.html
deepsoup - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to nniff:
> I watched 'Ghost' many years ago...

Ghost!
Did nothing for me. ;O)

But you reminded me that it was in the cinema about the same time as Truly, Madly, Deeply. (Was there ever a more striking USA vs UK cinematic contrast? Patrick Swayze & Demi Moore -vs- Alan Rickman & Juliet Stevenson.)

God I blubbed. I just watched a poor quality clip on youtube and blubbed again. (And reminded myself what a fabulous film it was, must try to find a dvd. :O)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWVmRT64EO8
(And that's not even anything to do with the film, its just *that* piece of music - the Bach sonata they play together on piano & cello.)
Ava Adore - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to deepsoup:

I'm currently working my way through DVDs I've had for ages but never watched. First up is Truly Madly Deeply. I'm having to watch it bit by bit because it's just too darned upsetting! Just got to the bit where Alan Rickman has appeared.
Tall Clare - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

On the blatant mawkish sentimentality front, I'd also like to nominate the book of Love Story.

Sophisticated? No. Subtle? No.

Oh, and the book of Ordinary People too.

It's all about the late 60s/early 70s WASPy overwrought northern US fiction here, folks.
Hugh J - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: Oh yeah, apart from The Lives of Others, The Princess Princess when Inigo final catches up with Count Rugen:

Inigo Montoya: Offer me anything I ask for.
Count Rugen: Anything you want...
Inigo Montoya: I want my father back, you son of a bitch!

Also gets me every time - inconthebable!
TMM - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

I'll 'fess up to blubbing during the final episode of Band of Brothers and Blackadder as well as Local Hero, Red Dog and War Horse.

TMM - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Hugh J:

The Princess Bride. Inconceivable! A great tale and some lovely guitar work from Mark Knopfler.
abzmed on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

Mike and the Mechanics "Living Years".
Especially the verse about his Father.

<doh! off again>
Ava Adore - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

Thinking back over great blubfest moments, my crowning glory has to be when I saw Tell Me On A Sunday, the musical. Denise van Outen was starring and she was ace. At the very end, there was a new song (not in the original musical) inserted which was very simple but, for me, very poignant, particularly as it was supported by lots of on screen photos of happy families. My poor partner at the time was incredulous at the amount of blub going on. :-)
Daithi O Murchu - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

movies:

leslie's death in Bridge to Terabithia

And probably for most of Where the Wild things are
but i think that's what the director of that one intended

songs:
Billy Bragg - tank park salute
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5heTJ65bdhU
owlart - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: I also cried when I was there and my friend propsed to his girlfriend in Wales. I cried again that night when I looked back over the day before I went to sleep!
captain paranoia - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

As a young kid, I got given this book:

http://www.alibris.com/booksearch?qwork=743744

I suppose someone thought it had a nice red balloon on the front, so it couldn't be that bad. Wrong. The end is terribly sad (no spoilers here...), and I blubbed and blubbed, and hid the book in the bottom of my wardrobe, and never looked at it again.

Then, as an adult, I found someone else who had the book, and it had had the same effect on her. I think we both blubbed again when we talked about it.

Pretty much anything that depicts selfless or abiding love, honour or partings will get me going. The list is too long...
butteredfrog - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to abzmed:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bSwL9deXNW8

Musically this always gets me.

deepsoup - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Ava Adore:
And you've never seen it before? Wow. I'm a little bit jealous. :O)

Not really. I saw it at the cinema and it was wonderful. (But *so* embarrassing. It wasn't a discreet little man-sniffle, I was a mess!)

> Just got to the bit where Alan Rickman has appeared.

Ha. That was the bit I just watched on youtube and blubbed again.

butteredfrog - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to butteredfrog:
> (In reply to abzmed)
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bSwL9deXNW8
>
> Musically this always gets me.

Yeah, just listened to it again, typing this with tears on my cheeks. (must see more of my dad!)

Hugh J - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to TMM:
> (In reply to Pyreneenemec)
>
> I'll 'fess up to blubbing during the final episode of Band of Brothers and Blackadder as well as Local Hero, Red Dog and War Horse.

Oh yeah, Blackadder goes Fourth - the last episode - forgot that as well. I'm just a big cry-baby really!
Ava Adore - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Hugh J:

Is that the Blackadder where he goes "over the top" in WW1? Indeed, very moving.
Hugh J - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Ava Adore:
> (In reply to Hugh J)
>
> Is that the Blackadder where he goes "over the top" in WW1? Indeed, very moving.

Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here? Good luck, everyone.
Mooncat - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Ava Adore:
> (In reply to Hugh J)
>
> Is that the Blackadder where he goes "over the top" in WW1? Indeed, very moving.

On a similar theme, Gallipoli, that music doesn't help.
cap'nChino - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Hugh J:
> (In reply to TMM)

> Oh yeah, Blackadder goes Fourth - the last episode - forgot that as well. I'm just a big cry-baby really!

Very moving scene I thought. Ive only seen the scene once when I was 15 (young and immature), it has stayed with me in to my 30's. Didn't cry at the time though.

Up had me in a mild wimper, thankfully I could hide behind 3d specs.
Marley and me had me going at the end.
deepsoup - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Mooncat:
Speaking of Gallipolli, and music: since I read your post I've had "The Band Played Waltzing Matilda" stuck in my head.
(In my head it sounds like June Tabor is singing it, which is nice.)
justmooching on 09 Nov 2012
My films with choke points:

welcome to Sarajevo - orphaned young girl walking away down corridor

Mr reliable - when police shoot wallys dog and crowd turn on police
When police return injured dog.
When wally comes home free at end

dumbo - swinging on his imprisoned mums trunk

whisper of the heart - when old fellas join in music

Winnie the poohs most grand adventure - singing about being all alone

oh, and falling into a bog on 3rd day of a miserable wet winter walking camping trip on dartmoor nearly made me cry.
steve taylor - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

> What do other UKC forum-users get emotional about ? Be honest and momentarily return to a time when everything was innocent and simple !

This effing thread for starters.

Plus...

Martha by Tom Waits

Babe the Pig

War Horse

Time Traveller's Wife

Last episode of Ballykissangel.

plus many, many others.
steve taylor - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Daithi O Murchu:
> (In reply to Pyreneenemec)
>
> movies:
>
> leslie's death in Bridge to Terabithia
>

Bastards - the trailers didn't give you any clue on this one. My kids gave me and the missus really dirty looks when we watched this. Who directed it - I'll avow never to watch one of their films ever again.
steve taylor - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas - grim.
Pursued by a bear - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: During the Olympic opening ceremony the singing of Abide With Me had me in tears. Twice; the other half missed it and when we watched it on catch up, off I went again.

But music can catch me like that. A few weeks later I'd suggested the lyrics of a song as the reading at our wedding, and the woman who I am now proud to call my wife didn't know it so onto the stereo it went. Three or so minutes later we were both in floods of tears. It was Peter Gabriel's cover of The Book Of Love by The Magnetic Fields. How we avoided weeping when it was read at the wedding is a mystery.

T.
sleavesley on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: fittingly for his weekend, The last post always brings a tear to my eyes and makes me want to say "we will remember them".
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adam11 - on 09 Nov 2012
'Tempest' by St Bob on his most recent album. I can't listen to that track without tears in my eyes.
eglwyseg-andy - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

Kentucky Avenue - Tom Waits
Manchild - Eels

Films are not really my thing although i do find The Deer Hunter incredibly difficult too watch
paul walters - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Alyson: UP has got to be one of the saddest films I have ever seen.... I watched it with my 6 year old niece, and all she could see was the dogs in their "collars of shame"...so many of these films work on different levels.... I sobbed inwardly to avoid upsetting the child..... she was so innocent and simply incapable of seeing the truth of it all.

Forrest Gump is another one.
paul walters - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to paul walters: The book of Warhorse had me blubbing... I'd borrowed if from the library.... the librarian actually said to me "but this is a childrens book".... I couldn't put it down, and read if from cover to cover in a single sitting..... I wept openly at the ending...

Captain Corelli's Mandolin too.... not the schmaltzy film, but the book.... I wept.... my ex wife took it on holiday to read, and I stayed awake as she finished it as I knew she'd need a hug when she got to the end.

I suppose anything where there is heartfelt loss..... Tom Rush's song "No Regrets", Arvo Parts "Spiegel Im Spiegel" (played at my father's committal) always bring tears to my eyes...... and Kate Rusby's "My Young Man" is only to be played when I'm sober..... anything more than one G&T and that somg reduces me to a snotty wreck before the end of the first verse.
Bobling - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

"It's a Wonderful Life". Choking, wrenching, manfully subdued sobbing everytime. I haven't watched it since I became a dad but can only imagine it will make it worse.
Toerag - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:
Wall-E. And the English Patient when she's in the cave.
Musically, I was listening to this when I heard my Gran was on her last legs recently. Such a beautiful tune, but now so sad :-(
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDi5VNzXuCQ
Steph-in-the-West on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

The main theme from "Out of Africa." It was my Dad's favourite - always made him cry cos it reminded him of Mum. We had it played at his funeral...
Just started me off again......

Bambi - when they escaped from the fire and he turned and said, "We made it Mother...."
UrbanSteve - on 09 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

When I was young a book called "I Am David" by Anne Holme I think.

I remember watching George Orwells "Animal Farm" and getting quite distressed when the pig dies and then the horse goes to the glue factory. I had no idea about the satire of the movie back then. They were just talking animals and they died Very distressing.
Boogs on 10 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:


The scene in Machine Gun Preacher when the little boy of few words starts talking in english , I saw it coming but it still made wince , then came the tears . Heartbreaking yet hopeful that film for me .


JJL - on 10 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

The choice in Sophie's Choice. Un-mans me.
grump gnome - on 10 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: Going over the top in the last episode of Black Adder Goes Forth.
Pyreneenemec - on 10 Nov 2012
In reply to JJL:
> (In reply to Pyreneenemec)
>
> The choice in Sophie's Choice. Un-mans me.



I found William Styron's book, one of the most powerful and thought provoking I have ever read. So much so, that I refused to watch the film adaptation until it was given away with a Sunday newspaper many years ago.
The film was entertaining and Meryl Streeps gives Sophie a rare intensity, yet the horrors portrayed in the film are ephemeral compared to the weeks; months of reflection engendered by the book.

paul walters - on 11 Nov 2012
In reply to JJL: Nothing un-manly about having feelings. Sophie's Choice stopped me in my tracks. Don't think I cried, but sent me into days of reflection.
verygneiss - on 11 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

I find the songs Dùthaich Mhic Aoidh (a song of mourning and hatred against The Duke of Sutherland, his wife, and his factor) and An Eala Bhàn (a song written in the trenches of the Somme) to be the saddest pieces of music I've ever heard.
ROFFER - on 12 Nov 2012
In reply to paul walters:

I am with you on "My Young Man". She played it at one of her gigs and my stiff upper lip was decidedly flacid!
bradzy_c - on 12 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: I know it's been mentioned but Up. After being dragged into the cinema's the t'other half and watching the first 15 minutes, I had to convince her that my contacts were flaring up again. Not a manly look.
pasbury on 12 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

The bit at the end of Toy Story 3 when Andy is passing his toys on had me blubbing.
pasbury on 12 Nov 2012
In reply to Alyson:
> (In reply to rockchomper)
>
>
> In fact just this week I cried in a coffee shop (slightly embarrassing this one) at the end of Ptolemy's Gate by Johnathan Stroud which is a childrens' book ffs!
>

Oh dear - you've reminded me of the time I burst into tears in Waterstones - I'd just read Goodbye Mog - I'm soppy and and I know it.
Alyson - on 12 Nov 2012
In reply to bradzy_c:
> (In reply to Pyreneenemec) I know it's been mentioned but Up. After being dragged into the cinema's the t'other half and watching the first 15 minutes, I had to convince her that my contacts were flaring up again. Not a manly look.

It can be terribly dusty in cinemas! ;)
ripper - on 12 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec: nearly 80 responses and I'm the only one who cried at Brassed Off? maybe you have to be of a similar political persuasion, but I found the story of skilled men doing an important job being cast on the slag heap, along with their families, to be a real tear-jerker. That and the sure and certain knowledge that I'd never get my hands on the pert 'n' perky Miss Tara Fitzgerald...
lithos on 12 Nov 2012
this when on radio - devastating and brilliant

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-19620897
digby - on 12 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

The Railway Children - nobody? "Daddy my Daddy"!!
Pyreneenemec - on 12 Nov 2012
In reply to verygneiss:

There's no accounting for taste !

Fraser on 12 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

I've neither read the book nor seen the film, but I listened to the end of 'War Horse' on the radio in the car one dark evening on the way home. Glad I was alone!

Also, pretty much any wild animal documentary on tv these days, eg "A Wolf called Storm" on recently, anything with polar bears, Siberian tigers etc etc. Oh, and that Dominic Allen (?) documentary when he tried to cross from Siberia to Alaska by dog sled.
paul walters - on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to ROFFER: "My Young Man" has special poignance for me as my Dad had been a miner and died from fibrosing alveolitis as a result of the coal dust he'd breathed as a young man..... seeing him ashen and withered in his later years made me realise that what he did decades ago came to haunt him...... I can't listen to that song without thinking of him and the waste.
JoshOsh on 19 Nov 2012
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

Whilst doing GCSE and A-level languages, we watched a number of French and German films, many of which I found poignant. European cinema seemed to be a lot deeper than the films I was used to.

Indigènes (Days of Glory) about Algerian soldiers fighting for France in WW2 but not being treated fairly or being recognised for their efforts was sad. I thought about it for days afterwards. La Haigne (Hatred) about youths in a French suburb being treated badly by the police stayed with me for a while too. The German film Das Boot (Submarine) was a long film but very moving and sad at the end - good to see war from the other side's perspective.

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