/ Name that book!

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jonnie3430 - on 14 Nov 2012
Post a few favourite lines from a mountaineering book and let others guess which book. No google and no reference to books (but you can when trying to get a quote right!)

I'll start: "as I rose up the management ladder I must admit to having had reservations that drowsiness on a Monday morning could dull my enthusiasm for the endless chain of meetings. Remarkably, though, the opposite seemed to be the case. The only conclusion that can be drawn must be that weekend trips to Scotland are good for you."

The more quotes the better.
Pero - on 14 Nov 2012
In reply to jonnie3430: Must be Mick Fowler!
jonnie3430 - on 14 Nov 2012
In reply to Pero:

Book please!
Clarence - on 14 Nov 2012
In reply to jonnie3430:

Vertical Pleasure - The Secret Life of a Taxman?

While since I read that. I have a copy with three signatures because he kept grabbing it out of my hand while we were chatting. Typical taxman!
jonnie3430 - on 14 Nov 2012
In reply to Clarence:

2 points to Pero, 8 to Clarence. I'm reading it at the moment and enjoying it.

How about this: "A lot of thinks I learnt in the dojo could also be used to improve my climbing and, even more important, the way in which I taught climbing. I made myself and my students breath out when making a strenuous move and to relax."
Gordon Stainforth - on 14 Nov 2012
In reply to jonnie3430:

Possibly Johnny Dawes' Full of Myself. Haven't bothered to look it up. Vaguely familiar.
jonnie3430 - on 14 Nov 2012
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

Nope.
lardbrain - on 14 Nov 2012
In reply to jonnie3430: sounds very much like Mark Twight in Extreme Alpinism...
jonnie3430 - on 14 Nov 2012
In reply to lardbrain:

Uh uh, Gordon was closer with the era, but wrong style...

Try this, one of my favourites: "The only time that I was sick on the expedition was when I had a pound of cheese and four Mars bars for breakfast."
jonnie3430 - on 15 Nov 2012
In reply to jonnie3430:

In a bid to awaken interest...

"Easy is a walk. Moderate isn't much better. When you land on a difficult, you're getting somewhere. If you land on a very difficult, you won't get anywhere. And if you see a severe, raise your hat and walk past it."
ripper - on 15 Nov 2012
In reply to jonnie3430: Wainwright?
jonnie3430 - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to jonnie3430:

Another (these are all from different books,):

"Meanwhile we were still somewhat wet after the waterfall, but our partial ducking had a pronounced psychological effect. The mettle of the party had been tempered by immersion. Each one of us had struck top form, such form as one finds but once or twice in a year's hard climbing."
Jacob Ram - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to jonnie3430: Sounds like W H Murrey, Mountaineering in Scotland?
Jacob Ram - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to David Best:
> (In reply to jonnie3430) Sounds like W H Murrey, Mountaineering in Scotland?

Your last puzzler that is.

jonnie3430 - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to David Best:

15 points!!

"I moved on at a snail's pace, finding it necessary to take twenty breaths to a single stride. Every yard or two I fell down on the snow. My ski-sticks were my last succour; Samaritan-fashion they supported me and saved my life."
Jacob Ram - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to jonnie3430:
> (In reply to David Best)
>
> 15 points!!
>
> "I moved on at a snail's pace, finding it necessary to take twenty breaths to a single stride. Every yard or two I fell down on the snow. My ski-sticks were my last succour; Samaritan-fashion they supported me and saved my life."

Hmmmm! Are we still with Murrey, when he is on Brearich(sp) in a whiteout?

Avinash Aujayeb - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to jonnie3430:

I am one of the searchers. There are, I believe millions of us. We are not unhappy, but neither are we really content. We continue to explore ourselves, hoping to understand. We like to walk along the beach, we are drawn by the ocean, taken by its power, its unceasing motion, its mystery and unspeakable beauty. We like forests and mountains, deserts and hidden rivers and lonely cities as well. Our sadness is as much a part of our lives as is our laughter. To share our sadness with one we love is perhaps as great a joy as we can know–unless it be to share laughter.

We searchers are ambitious only for life itself, for everything beautiful it can provide. Most of all we want to love and be loved. We want to live in a relationship that will not impede our wandering, nor prevent our search, nor lock us in prison walls; that will take us for what little we have to give. We do not want to prove ourselves to another or to compete for love.

This is a book for wanderers, dreamers and lovers, for lonely men and women who dare to ask of life everything good and beautiful. It is for these who are too gentle to live among wolves.
Avinash Aujayeb - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to aujayeb:

Not quite mountaineering or climbing per se, but epitomises what we are and look for in others.

Guess the book then
jonnie3430 - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to David Best:
> (In reply to jonnie3430)
> [...]
>
> Hmmmm! Are we still with Murrey, when he is on Brearich(sp) in a whiteout?

Nein!
Fredt on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to jonnie3430:
> (In reply to David Best)
>
> 15 points!!
>
> "I moved on at a snail's pace, finding it necessary to take twenty breaths to a single stride. Every yard or two I fell down on the snow. My ski-sticks were my last succour; Samaritan-fashion they supported me and saved my life."

Hermann Buhl 'Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage'?
ads.ukclimbing.com
JollyGreen on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to aujayeb:

Kavanaugh's There are men...
jonnie3430 - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to Fredt:

14 points, I think it's an amazing book, not just the cycling, but for winter routes too.

"was interested in out psychic response to things - a rushing cataract, say, a dark vault or a cliff-face - that seized, terrified and yet also somehow pleased the mind by dint of being too big, too high, too fast, too obscured, too powerful, too something, to be properly comprehended. These were sublime sights - hectic, intimidating, uncontrollable - and they inspired in the observer, said Burke, a heady blend of pleasure and terror."
Avinash Aujayeb - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to JollyGreen:

Spot on mate

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