/ What rock types are safe for drying?

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Ciro - on 16 Nov 2012
The earlier troll got me wondering, what rock types are safe for drying by blowtorch?
Trangia - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Ciro:

I think you've made a mistake. It's not the rock you dry with a blow torch, you need to train it onto your hands to ensure that they are fully dry.
ellis - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Ciro:

Use a Stihl leaf-blower.
Ciro - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Trangia:

Thanks for your informative contribution.
Bruce Hooker - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Trangia:

I'd go for using it to dry the empty space between the ears. When the flame comes out the other ear you know it's well dried.
lanky and weak - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Ciro: think what they are saying is dont blowtorch the rock?
mkean - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Ciro:
Serious answer alert!!!!!

Real answer is none. Almost any type of rock is going to have the potential to contain small voids or cracks that will shatter when heated.

It is a matter of degree though as gentle heat is obviously not going to damage a bit of solid rock, but gentle heat probably isn't best supplied by a blowtorch :-)
mattrm - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Ciro:

I know that folk local to me do blow torch holds at a local venue. But this specific venue is under the water twice a day getting a good old battering by the tide. So honestly, you're not really going to make things worse. It's also never going to be anything more than a place locals go cause it's what we've got.

But otherwise, it's a no-no as it's going to knacker the rock regardless. If you have to dry a hold, take some extra towels. That's all you can really do.
Ciro - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to lanky and weak:
> (In reply to Ciro) think what they are saying is dont blowtorch the rock?

I seem to remember watching a video a while back of some sponsored climbers doing exactly this in scandinavia, so I assumed there were certain rock types where it was safe.

Or is it just certain countries where the potential for damage from the practice is accepted?

I'm not planning to run out and do it tomorrow, just curious.
Ciro - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to mkean & mattrm: cheers
tom_in_edinburgh - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Ciro:
> The earlier troll got me wondering, what rock types are safe for drying by blowtorch?

This blowtorch stuff is just cause the english are jealous of proper volcanic rocks. If you get the grit and limestone hot enough it might just turn into gabbro.

Jonny2vests - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to tom_in_edinburgh:
> (In reply to Ciro)
> [...]
>
> This blowtorch stuff is just cause the english are jealous of proper volcanic rocks.

Sounds like you're overdue a trip to the Lake District.

slacky on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Ciro:
> (In reply to lanky and weak)
> [...]
>
> I seem to remember watching a video a while back of some sponsored climbers doing exactly this in scandinavia, so I assumed there were certain rock types where it was safe.

Just because they are sponsored doesn't make them a paragon for geological knowledge and that they will always do the right thing.
Ciro - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to slacky:
> (In reply to Ciro)
> [...]
>
> Just because they are sponsored doesn't make them a paragon for geological knowledge and that they will always do the right thing.

No, but it does give the impression that the practice is followed in certain areas... I doubt the sponsors would want to be associated with a bunch of guys turning up and trashing a crag against the locals wishes. In fact, a quick check on the petzl team website shows one of their athletes proudly proclaiming the impliment as part of his basic climbing equipment:

"note the blowtorch that has turnend to be a part of my basic climbing equipment. I guess I will need it this winter in Sweden if I have any desires to touch rock before april..."

http://saidbelhaj.petzlteam.com/
Ramblin dave - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to jonny2vests: or Dartmoor or Cornwall or Lundy, come to that...
Skyfall - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Ramblin dave:

or N Wales...
TonyB - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Ciro:
>
> I seem to remember watching a video a while back of some sponsored climbers doing exactly this in scandinavia, so I assumed there were certain rock types where it was safe.
>

Not just sponsored climbers in Finland. I think there are a reasonable number of people doing it. The rock is granite and probably more resistant than most rock types but I always thought it was a really silly idea.

I've seen people drying holds on Normipaiva with a blow torch. It seemed a really good way to ruin a really classic problem and at that time one of the hardest in Finland.

For those who don't know Normipaiva
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MgtcnryUBJU

ripper - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to JonC:
> (In reply to Ramblin dave)
>
> or N Wales...

which is not, strictly speaking, in England....
Ciro - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to TonyB:

Nice line indeed... so has it been trashed?
Jonny2vests - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to JonC:
> (In reply to Ramblin dave)
>
> or N Wales...

I think English volcanic rock in N Wales is prob stretching it a bit :-)
Skyfall - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to ripper:

I was focussing on the 'anywhere but Scotland' aspect not attempting to annex the welsh any more than they already are.

Shall I keep digging ? ;)
tom_in_edinburgh - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to jonny2vests:
> (In reply to tom_in_edinburgh)
> [...]
>
> Sounds like you're overdue a trip to the Lake District.

I'm going to argue that's geologically part of Scotland ;-)

JDal - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to tom_in_edinburgh:
> (In reply to jonny2vests)
> [...]
>
> I'm going to argue that's geologically part of Scotland ;-)

And this from someone who thinks if you heat up limestone or grit you might get gabbro. ;) ;)



Ava Adore - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to Ciro:

Diamonds
muppetfilter - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to Ava Adore:

>
> Diamonds

You don't want to do that, being pure carbon they burn.


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