/ Juicers

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TheDrunkenBakers - on 16 Nov 2012
I'm thinking of buying my wife a juicer as a present - yes I know, not very romantic etc etc, and I did get her a puppy a few weeks ago.

Thing is, she really loves fresh juice and so would realy love to be able to make carrot, beetroot, celery etc juices.

I havent had one before and so do these things actually work well i.e. do you have to buy 15kilos of carrot to get a 250ml glass full? Are they easy to clean? can you stuff anyting in them from tomatoes to cucumber? They come in lots of varieties so do i need to pay the earth or will the less expensive ones be pretty decent too.

Ta

Richard
ripper - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers: Had one a few years ago - it worked fairly well but was a bit of a faff to use, stuff had to be prepared (cut fairly small, peeled in some cases, cored, you could only feed in a fairly small amount at a time etc) but the worst thing was the cleaning, which was such a drag that the thing was fairly soon consigned to the back of the cupboard. Things might have changed since then, of course.
Personally i prefer chucking a banana and some frozen berries, or whatever in a blender and making a smoothie.
Wonko The Sane - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers:
> I'm thinking of buying my wife a juicer as a present - yes I know, not very romantic etc etc, and I did get her a puppy a few weeks ago.
>
> Thing is, she really loves fresh juice and so would realy love to be able to make carrot, beetroot, celery etc juices.
>
> I havent had one before and so do these things actually work well i.e. do you have to buy 15kilos of carrot to get a 250ml glass full? Are they easy to clean? can you stuff anyting in them from tomatoes to cucumber? They come in lots of varieties so do i need to pay the earth or will the less expensive ones be pretty decent too.
>
> Ta
>
> Richard

I bought one for my ex many years ago. She loved it to bits.

The yield from different fruits/veg varies. I think if she's into it like my gf was, you're destined to have loads of stuff lying around for the first few weeks.
I remember she used to go to a market to buy bulk veg for juicing at the end of the day when they sold off the 'crap' stuff. A bit of cutting to get rid of icky bits and you're away.
Wonko The Sane - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers: REALLY messy to clean though.
EeeByGum - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers: I believe juicers are in the same realms as the icecream maker, bread maker and paster maker. Used once and then consigned to the cupboard of eternity until you move at which point they will be eBayed or thrown away.

Why not just buy her a selection of carrot, beetroot or celery smoothies from the supermarket?
TheDrunkenBakers - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to EeeByGum:
> (In reply to TheDrunkenBakers) I believe juicers are in the same realms as the icecream maker, bread maker and paster maker. Used once and then consigned to the cupboard of eternity until you move at which point they will be eBayed or thrown away.
>
> Why not just buy her a selection of carrot, beetroot or celery smoothies from the supermarket?

I take your point although Im our defence, we still use our bread maker and its about 15 years old.

Ive done the smoothie maker thing and in the end it was used to the end of its life. i guess I would have to make an economic choice too as i dont want to spend a fortune on raw material to get little out.

What got me thinking about this is that we have recently been buying cartons of beetroot juice but its realy pricey and you cant get carrot juice in cartons anywhere.

Orange, apple and tomato juice is obviously pretty widespread and well priced, even for organic, freshly squeezed stuff so this wasnt my thinking. Plus, the sugar content is much lower in veggies so would probably (I wait for the arguments here) healthier.

And then there is the fruit which we waste every month. For instance, we buy loads of apples and inevitably they go a little soft and so can they be used in a juicer.

See where im coming from.

existing debt - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers:

we have one of these.

http://www.philips.co.uk/c/juicers-and-blenders/aluminium-collection-700-w-2-l-xl-tube-hr1861_00/prd...

we go thru stages of usage, it came ( i think) with reciepe book, but you can buy some great books. the breakfast juices/smoothies were my fav, or a warm apple/cinnimon drink on a winters evening...

re cleaning, just scrape out the peel and then stick it all in the dishwasher...hardly a chore.

Paul
TheHorroffice - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers:
I use one of these to make veg juices, it only requires a rinse to clean it. The downside is your 'juice' is rather fibrous (this might be a good thing) to say the least and to get it to blend you need to add some sort of liquid ie apple juice which kind of defeats the point!
But I use it every day and waste is non existent.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Braun-blender-Multiquick-buffet-MQ5-MR550/dp/B001RU3680/ref=sr_1_3?s=kitchen...
Kimono - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers:
juicers are great! I used to juice every day when i had one. You get into the routine and it only takes 5 mins or so to prepare, juice and rinse it clean.

I have even heard of people baking bread with the leftover pulp!
ripper - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to kieran b:
> (In reply to TheDrunkenBakers)
>
> I have even heard of people baking bread with the leftover pulp!

or chucking it in soups, if you like home-made soup
Jamming Dodger on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers: I borrowed one a while back. It was a faff to clean (mainly cause tiny bits of fibrous veg get stuck in it) and I had the WORST stomach ache in the world until the novelty wore off! At which point I gave it back.
Jamming Dodger on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers: And dont get the puppy and the papaya mixed up.
Frank4short - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers: Have one of these http://www.amazon.co.uk/Philips-HR1861-Aluminium-Juicer-Cleaning/dp/B0007XHGHA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&am... it get's used about 2-4 times a week on average. To be honest it's a lot of faff to clean. That asides though it works very well. And isn't quite the faff in use some others have suggested e.g. the spout for putting fruit and veg in is big enough to take a medium size apple. As to the yield for about a pint of juice I'd put in 3 average size carrots, a nub of ginger and 3-5 apples depending on the size of the apples that are cheapest at the time. So whilst it does use a fair amount of fruit n veg, if used a lot, if you're canny about what you buy it's not necessarily that expensive. Certainly cheaper than buying the equivalent amount of Innocent or another high end fresh fruit or smoothy brand. Only thing is putting soft fruit like berries into it is a waste of time as you get feck all juice out of them.
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers:
> I'm thinking of buying my wife a juicer as a present and I did get her a puppy a few weeks ago.

Bloody hell, that's a worry...
TheDrunkenBakers - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Submit to Gravity:
> (In reply to TheDrunkenBakers)
> [...]
>
> Bloody hell, that's a worry...

Its just an experiment to see if chocolate labradors actually taste like chocolate.

In reply to TheDrunkenBakers: Fair point - I hadn't thought about that.

A bloke I worked with once bought his missus a bread bin for Christmas...
Ben Sharp - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers:

> Thing is, she really loves fresh juice...
Well, who doesn't...

On a serious note though, if you don't have a dishwasher try and look at one in a shop and get one that's easy to clean. Also look for one with a bit entrance tube as it will mean you don't spend all your time chopping apples up. The magimix ones are quite good but not particularly cheap.
Ben Sharp - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to Ben Sharp: that was meant to be "big entrance tube"

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