/ Double-Barrelled Surnames

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Steve John B - on 16 Nov 2012
Got some (unmarried) friends who are expecting their first kid, they're thinking about combining their surnames and giving it a double-barrelled surname.

I always used to think "posh get"(not that there's anything wrong with being a posh get) , but maybe that's just for your Fortesque-Smythes and the like.

Is it getting more common as our godless heathen nation produces more children out of wedlock (which is a great word btw)?

What reckonest thou?
Clarence - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B:

My family acquired a double-barreled surname when the only offspring of a prominent family in my tree was <gasp> a woman. I'm not in any way remotely posh.
rocky57 - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B:

Well that's how I got my user name. Full name is Rockfort Fyfe-Severne.
Tall Clare - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B:

I think if your names are short it's not so weird, but if they're long, it becomes a bit of a mouthful - and then what happens if double-barrelled child reproduces with another double-barrelled child? Stop this madness! Give them numbers, I say!
Tall Clare - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to rocky57:

Nicely done.
owlart - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B: What happens when their child meets and has children with someone in a similar position, does their offspring end up with a quadruple-barrelled name? This could get very silly a few generations down the line - they'll have to make passports bigger :-)
Duncan Bourne - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B:
My grandfather had a double barrelled name as a result of being born out of wedlock. However he never used it except officially and didn't seem to get on with his dad (ie didn't record his name on his wedding certificate). A friend who has a genuine old double barrelled name uses it to get things done but hardly ever in a social context.
sbc_10 - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B:

My friends daughter is a "Lewis", married to a "Hamilton" and yes they have gone for the full double B.

Lets hope he does well at Mercedes.
rocky57 - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to sbc_10:

I don't get it! Hamilton-Lewis?
Sebastian Fontleroy - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B:

Yeah I'm not with the mother of our child and i wanted to make sure my surname was on the birth certificate so we came to the compromise of a double-barrelled. The kid has got one crazy-arsed name now though poor thing. Maximilian Christopher Appleton-Fontleroy. I think he may get bullied.
MJ - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B:

Could always adopt the Icelandic method of naming: -

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icelandic_name
jonnie3430 - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B:
> Got some (unmarried) friends who are expecting their first kid, they're thinking about combining their surnames and giving it a double-barrelled surname.
>
I think that they could do that, but actually combine them, not giving a double barrelled name (naff,) but a new name and keeping the place interesting. Like Lewis and Hamilton becoming Lamilton, or Hewis. I would be a Jalliams if that was the case, which would be much more interesting...

Kemics - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to MJ:

That's awesome. So Jonsson is literally Son of Jon. Still rocking it viking style. Brilliant!
Kimono - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B:
Completely normal in Spain...though they tend to only really use one of the names unless its for official purposes.

I briefly had one when i was younger and f@cking hated it!
Changed my name the second i got to 18
thebrookster on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B:

No reason why not. My surname is double-barrelled for similar reasons. My father had been married previously, and my mother had the delight of meeting said ex.

She refused point blank after that to take the same name, and my father, being of the old-fashioned mentality was never going to take her name!

Now, I still keep my name, makes not the blindest bit of difference to me. A name is a name, after all. My youngest sister is of the same opinion.

My brother has shortened his name un-officially, for simplicity's sake, but still has the full double-barrel elsewhere.

My other sister however, revels in her surname, and uses it mercilessly for any advantage. But then she is of the 'keeping up with the jones' crowd!!
Robbo1 - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B: Unless they really care about it (and if they are asking the question then they probably don't), why not save their child the extra time of having to fill in both names on any form?

Also, they should carefully think about initials and any potential bullying at school. I came across a guy the other day from Singapore called Mr Wee Tart Gay...
jonnie3430 - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Robbo1:
>
> I came across a guy the other day from Singapore called Mr Wee Tart Gay...

Disgusting. What were you thinking. No, better not let us know...
Jim C - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to thebrookster:
> (In reply to Steve John B)
>
> No reason why not. My surname is double-barrelled for similar reasons.......
>
> My other sister however, revels in her surname, and uses it mercilessly for any advantage. But then she is of the 'keeping up with the jones' crowd!!

You hit it there, for some with no 'history' it is a way for those who think they are a bit 'better' than others to find each other, and play the KUWTJ game, meanwhile they appear to be unaware that the people they aspire so hard to be like, look down on them for their crass folly.



Eric9Points - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to owlart:

I once met a Dutch woman with a Phd and a quadruple barreled name. She could hardly fit it all on her business card. They've banned them in Germany.

My son ended up with a double barreled name. I'd wanted to give him my surname if he was a boy and his mother's surname if she was a girl but his mother wasn't having any of it so he got both our surnames. He only uses one though.



janiejonesworld - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B: at least it makes it easy to pick who to put up against the wall come the revolution
ads.ukclimbing.com
Mr. K - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B: My wife went double-barrelled when we got married which I believe isn't uncommon. She's not posh! =o)
PixieNinja - on 16 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B: My parents separated when I was really little, but no way could I have a double-barrelled name that long... Chapman-Papachristopherou
adstapleton - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B:

Lame.

Shenanigans.

The child should take the father's name, even if the wife does not.

FACT.
thebrookster on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to adstapleton:
> The child should take the father's name, even if the wife does not.


They have. Just with the mothers added on ;) :P
kbow265 - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B: Why not combine bits of both the names, like Fortsmythe or Smythesque instead of Fortesque-Smythe? :)
abseil on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to owlart:
>..does their offspring end up with a quadruple-barrelled name?...they'll have to make passports bigger...

Tell me about it...

Signed
Abseil
(Veronica Jones-Smith-Flubber-Jenks-Macmillan-Wilson-Thatcher-Eisenhower-Nixon-Reagan-Washington-Kim-Gillard-Blair-Clegg-Wright)
In reply to Steve John B: Reminds me of the Katherine Tate sketch set at public school sports day.
Denni on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B:

My surname is dé-Saint-Bissix-Croix and I'm not posh!

It is a constant mare trying to explain it over the phone, fill in forms as there are never enough spaces for it and online stuff? Many a time I've tried to buy something but the Internet forms refuse to believe that is my name saying "too many characters"

For our daughters sake, well until she is older, we just use dé-Saint, poor bugger trying to spell that!
Morgan Woods - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to adstapleton:
> (In reply to Steve John B)
>

> FACT.

i guess that settles it then :p
Tall Clare - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to adstapleton:

at risk of feeding a troll, why?
Tall Clare - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to Eric9Points:

was your thinking on the basis that women change their surnames when they marry? Nice.

I changed my surname when I was 21, from my dad's surname to my mum's maiden name. My dad said he'd have been upset if either of my brothers had done that, but for me it didn't matter as I'd change it when I married. As it happens, I marry next year and have no intention of changing my name again - it's a pain, and I like my name.

Ava Adore - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to Tall Clare:

No offence to your beloved but his surname is deadly boring so yes, stick with current name :-)
Tall Clare - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to Ava Adore:

Exactly! :-)
Steve John B - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to Jim C:
> (In reply to thebrookster)
> [...]
>
> You hit it there, for some with no 'history' it is a way for those who think they are a bit 'better' than others to find each other, and play the KUWTJ game, meanwhile they appear to be unaware that the people they aspire so hard to be like, look down on them for their crass folly.

It's more so they can have both their surnames carry on, rather than any social aspiration. Most of the d-b's round their way are black working class single mothers and their nippers!

At least if you get hungry you can take the chip off your shoulder and eat it eh?
jonnie3430 - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to florence58:
> (In reply to Steve John B) Why not combine bits of both the names, like Fortsmythe or Smythesque instead of Fortesque-Smythe? :)

It would create a much more interesting world and respects both names as well.
Al Evans on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to jonnie3430: Of course Edwin Drummond only became Ed Ward Drummond when he got married to Ms Ward and had a kid, I think he has now shortened it back to Ed Drummond, I don't know about Mrs Ward Drummond.
Eric9Points - on 17 Nov 2012
In reply to Tall Clare:
> (In reply to Eric9Points)
>
> was your thinking on the basis that women change their surnames when they marry? Nice.
>

No that never occurred to me. I guess I assumed that a daughter of mine probably wouldn't change her surname if she got married but then I've never got married so I was probably thinking she wouldn't either.

Anyway it would seem to me that it would be less trouble in a woman's life if they didn't change their surnames. It would make it easier to keep in contact with distant friends etc.
captain paranoia - on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to Ava Adore:

> No offence to your beloved but his surname is deadly boring so yes, stick with current name :-)

Creuzfeldt-Jakob...?
Steve John B - on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to Jim C:

I was going to reply to your message of a couple of minutes ago but you've deleted it. Curious as to what ex-Tory ministers have to do with anything - oh yes, it's that "working class" chip doing the talking for you again :0
Jim C - on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B:
> (In reply to Jim C)
> [...]
>
> It's more so they can have both their surnames carry on, rather than any social aspiration. Most of the d-b's round their way are black working class single mothers and their nippers!
>
> At least if you get hungry you can take the chip off your shoulder and eat it eh?

These are the people who YOU , meet, the kind of people I know are quite different.
I am just an amused working class chap , watching both groups with interest.
I 'know my place'' as one former Tory minister put it.

If they want to carry a family name forward, it can be done with middle names, without the need to be DB. I have one myself.

JIC
jonnie3430 - on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to Al Evans:

Do you not think that Ed Wammond would have summed it up much more nicely?
stroppygob - on 18 Nov 2012
krikoman - on 19 Nov 2012
In reply to stroppygob: We had one of those at school when Mr Brass married Miss Balls, don't think their kids had a double barrelled name.
Tall Clare - on 19 Nov 2012
In reply to Eric9Points:

Apologies for making assumptions based on projections from my own situation. I'm such a crabby arse.

<trudges off, dragging chip behind her as it's too big for her shoulder nowadays>
confusicating on 19 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B:

Me and my wife double-barreled when we got married.

But that's because of the gay marriage laws. We have to look a bit pretentious now if we want to be seen as equal.


*some or all of this is made up.

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