/ Training for Beep Test

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as646 on 18 Nov 2012
I have about 3 months to train for the beep test. I currently do very little running, I'm starting training today however. As I understand it, the best way to train is interval training, eg HIIT.

I'm currently scoring around a 9 on it. What is a realistic score I could get with 3 months hard training? Could I reasonably expect to get a 13?

Also, in terms of the amount I should train, I was thinking of doing 3 sessions of roughly half an hour of intervals a week, with maybe 1 long run thrown in as well. Too little? Too much? I've never done much running before, so not sure what consitutes a lot or a little.
a lakeland climber on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to as646:

What the hell's the "Beep Test"? Does it test endurance, strength, power? What do the scores mean?

ALC
as646 on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to a lakeland climber: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-stage_fitness_test

It measures VO2 Max. Essentially, you have an audio track that consists of regularly spaced "beeps". You are required to run between two lines 20m from each-other between the beeps. The time between the beeps gets progressively shorter as the test goes on.
a lakeland climber on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to as646:

It's very hard to alter your VO2max over a short period of time, assuming the scale is linear then you are asking for an increase in one of your base physiological indicators of nearly 50%.

Intervals will certainly help, mix them up, some on the flat some on the hills but no more than two sessions a week as they are very intensive. Combine with tempo runs to try and build your base fitness.

ALC
as646 on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to a lakeland climber: Cheers. I think you can to an extent "train" specifically for the beep test, eg practice turning and such, which will also improve. 13 is an ideal, I'm looking to go into the Royal Marines, and I believe the baseline score is 11, which is certainly achievable within 3 months.

Tempo runs; are these simply runs at a constant pace?
mkean - on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to as646:
Be a bit careful with your ankles :-) Good luck.
AndyE9 on 18 Nov 2012
When i joined the fire brigade , i had to do the beep test , it scored around 14 but , i was a lot fitter then …

the best way to train for this is to do shuttle runs , set out a track then run back and forward as you would on the test , then increase the intensity after every two min .. as you would on the test..

the key is in the stopping and turning fast …
Ben Sharp - on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to as646: as646: If you're looking to train for the Royal Marines and you don't do much running now then forget about the bleep test and put it to the back of your mind. Buy this book - Royal Marines Fitness: Physical Training Manual.

Focus your training around avoiding injury and increasing your running base. By all means do intervals (or better still hill reps) and throw one longer run in a week but if you jump in to three interval sessions and a long run you will greatly increase your chance of injury. It's not to say it can't be done but don't go from doing little to doing loads straight away. Just put down the miles (preferably off road) and strengthen your legs with squats, split squats, heel lifts etc.

What times are you getting for your split 3 mile run? I take it you've passed your pjft? If I was you I'd be more concerned about getting my return 1.5m run down to below 10 mins.

I think there's a potential royal marines forums, you might get better information from that.
Ben Sharp - on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to as646:
> Tempo runs; are these simply runs at a constant pace?

Tempo runs are at a constant pace but the pace has to be high enough and for a long enough duration to allow lactic acid to build up in your muscles. The more you train at your lactic threshold the better your body will adapt and increase it.

For a tempo run - if you're comfortable at a given pace your going too slow, if you have to keep slowing down you are going too fast. If you're uncomfortable but able to maintain the same speed you're doing a tempo run. 10 mins slow, 20 mins at the tempo pace and then 10 mins slow again is a pretty basic tempo run. Don't miss out the slow run to start or your muscles will get arsed.

Ben
IainRUK - on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to Ben Sharp: At his current level I think he needs to just run.. I wouldnt do anything specific like shuttes or tempos until by cv system was much stronger.. 9's pretty low.
as646 on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to Ben Sharp: Yeah, passed PJFT. Return was 9:17. I used to run a fair amount about a year ago, found it very difficult to motivate myself after moving from Wales to London. I hate running on roads.
AndyE9 on 18 Nov 2012
I didn't realise you were going for the marines ..

not heard of the PJFT , when I did it it was called PRMC ..lol… per mer per tram lol… something like that by sea by land…

good on you , hope you do well , just go running , you will be doing lots of it … :)
as646 on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to AndyE9: I'm applying as an officer; the pre-joining fitness test is essentially to establish you have a base level of fitness before you properly start your application. Just 2 timed 1.5 mile runs done with a minute of rest between them.

Will have the POC later, I can beast the press-ups, pull-ups and sit-ups, as well as any other strength-based exercise, running is the area that lets me down. Just going to have to man up and get out there!
scrufff on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to as646:

http://www.sealswcc.com/pdf/naval-special-warfare-physical-training-guide.pdf

This is a very good guide for the type of running you want to be doing (the other stuff you can take or leave). Basically rotating between long slow runs, hill/sprint repeats, and tempo runs.

The tempo runs and intervals should also help with the MSFT - though it might be worth practising it a few times before as well. 13 should be do-able with good preparation and a bit of grit however.
Camm on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to as646:
I had to do the bleep test for a job which I didn't get in the end but we had to complete level 9 with body armor on, to measure recovery rate they make you do it again 20 minutes after! I think I got to 10.something and it wasn't that hard just physicological because I thought I was about to do my last shuttle and they said we got to keep going. The second time without body armor, I got a similar score but it was a lot harder, my plan was to try and get as high as possible.
Camm on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to danrock101:
The only training I did for it was 2/3 weeks before, I did a lot of phyicological and technique training as I knew I had no chance of improving fitness by much in that time. Saying that my technique was quite bad, I could turn around so had to do a figure of 8 haha
Ee on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to as646: If you intend to do POC then you need to crack -on mate imho. The Bleep test is a fundamental tool that is used to measure your running ability,all be it indoors. The PJFT run is not as difficult in my own experience,and quite a lot of candidates on the POC/PRMC struggle on this element. As one of the other UKC posters has suggested,get yourself onto the PRMC forum,plus have a good look @ Onceamarinealwaysamarine www.Down load RM training tool as well if i were you.
Very best of luck with your application.
Ee(ex 45 Cmdo)
nedmoran on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to as646: A lot of people do the bleep test and underestimate the toll it takes on the thigh muscles due to turning around and having to push off from a stand still every 20m. Having said that if your going for your green lid as an officer, i'm sure you'll piss the bleep test. Enjoy your training when you get there. It may seem like a nightmare at times but years down the line you'll look back on it with fond memories.
as646 on 18 Nov 2012
Thanks for all the advice and words of encouragement. I may be a bit of a shite runner, but I'd like to think I have bucketloads of mental fortitude. Will take all the advice here to heart and work my arse off, coupled with a supreme effort on the day of, and I should beast it... even if I end up spewing my guts up when it's over!
BIgYeti86 - on 18 Nov 2012
In reply to as646: practice doing the beep test by downloading it and doing it. Also there is a little technique I use; when you turn, sprint hard to get to top speed quickly and then coast the rest of the distance so by the time you have to turn around you have nearly stopped anyway. You can squeeze a few more levels out this way.
Philo22 - on 19 Nov 2012
In reply to as646: audio downloads here: http://www.bleeptests.com/ pushup one looks like a killer!
nw - on 19 Nov 2012
In reply to as646:
Beep test? Beep test? Whats a flipping beep test? Attention to detail, switch on lofty etc etc

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