/ what does this mean?

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Rog Wilko on 20 Nov 2012
Browsing a French guidebook I came across the phrase "en chantier" applied to a number of pitches. Anyone clarify the meaning please?
Dave Kerr - on 20 Nov 2012
In reply to Rog Wilko:

Google Translate offers 'starts'
Rog Wilko on 20 Nov 2012
In reply to Dave Kerr: yes, I found that, but it makes no sense.
Dave Kerr - on 20 Nov 2012
In reply to Rog Wilko:

Context is everything. What's the full sentence?

Perhaps French Erick will be along soon.
jon on 20 Nov 2012
In reply to Rog Wilko:

It depends on the context of course, but it would normally mean that the route isn't finished. Sort of 'work in progress'.
Mark Bull - on 20 Nov 2012
In reply to Rog Wilko:

Chantier means a building site, but has a colloquial meaning of "a mess" (see http://french.about.com/od/vocabulary/g/chantier.htm ), so I guess scrappy/loose/chossy might be a plausible translation in this context.
French Erick - on 20 Nov 2012
In reply to Dave Kerr:
either they're in the process of equiping the crag (bolts...) or they're working on loose stuff and cleaning it (less likely).

If it was a project they've used the same word (projet) but could it be some locals' way of keeping people out ;)
Rog Wilko on 20 Nov 2012
In reply to French Erick: I thought I recalled seeing the word chantier relating to road works, so both the suggestions made could make sense. So if it means chossy, probably it still will be, but if it means being developed then it should be sorted by now (8 yr old guidebook). Thanks for the suggestions one and all.
jon on 20 Nov 2012
In reply to Rog Wilko:

Here you go Rog, always hung on the first bolt of an unfinished route:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/75247957@N03/8203130899/
Cheese Monkey - on 20 Nov 2012
In reply to Rog Wilko: I have just asked our Resident French person and she says it roughly means started but not finished, there is no real direct English translation
In reply to Cheese Monkey:
> I have just asked our Resident French person and she says it roughly means started but not finished, there is no real direct English translation

"work in progress"?


Chris
Offwidth - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to Chris Craggs:

WiP, wip or WIP. English evolves with use.

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