/ Blind old bat

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stroppygob - on 23 Nov 2012
I'm thinking of getting me dear old mum an e-reader for Xmas, as she used to love to read, but her failing sight makes this less easy for her now.

Can anyone recommend, or give me some clues as to which would be the best e-reader for the blind old bat?
oddtoast on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to stroppygob:
Any of them will have different text sizes, which might make enough of a difference in itself to be worthwhile. Just make sure she can actually get books onto it, I got my mum an mp3 player once but she didn't know (and wouldnt learn) how to change the music on it without help which was a pain!
lynda - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to stroppygob: Worth considering a colour one. My mum struggles to read my Kindle on the largest font setting, however she finds it much easier to read my ipad kindle app, when I have the contrast set to show white text on a black background (with obviously the large font setting).

So maybe the Kindle fire?

My mum has wet macular degeneration and myopic degeneration.

Richard Carter - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to stroppygob:

My mum has quite poor eyesight and uses a Kindle (keyboard), I guess any will be ok as you can make the text huge. Maybe the new lighty upy ones will be better because of the increase in contrast?
John_Hat - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to stroppygob:

It may be worth going to see a Low Vision Qualified Optician (It's an additional qualification over your "normal" optical qualification - Lady Blue is currently in the middle of the two year course).

There's quite a lot of things that can be done for those with really poor sight that your normal optician may not be aware of.

e.g. there's a funky optical scanner (looks a bit like a computer mouse) you can get which you run over the pages of a book and it brings the text up on any screen. Park the elderly person a couple of feet away from a huge flatscreen telly and they can have letters bigger than their head if they want... Obviously less extreme magnification is possible too!

However a LV Optician wil be able to look at the visual acuity and the condition/disease/etc the person has, and work out what can be done to make their life easier, whether it be medical, occupational (a surprisingly large number of elderly people with failing vision insist on reading in poor light, which does not improve things), or technological (e.g. the mouse scanner above).
elsewhere on 23 Nov 2012
stroppygob - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to stroppygob: Thanks for the kind and considerate answwers folks, tehy will be taken into account.

Technophobia, as mentioned above by oddtoast, is also a factor I have to consider.
Toby S - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to stroppygob:

Has she considered audiobooks at all? My mum is blind and she swears by her Victor Stream and takes it everywhere with her. Not as cheap as the Kindle but might be worth considering if her eyesight gets worse.

http://www.humanware.com/en-usa/products/blindness/dtb_players/compact_models/_details/id_302/victor...
Bimble on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to stroppygob:

Kindle Fire with the 'speaking book' feature. Reads it out to you if you can't make out the text/be bothered to read it.

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