/ How fast is fast

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mitchell1982 - on 05 Dec 2012
How fast is fast. As someone new to running, I started the beginning of this year just for a bit of exercise and something to do with no intension of taking it anywhere. Because I run by myself and have no real contact with other runners Iíve started to wonder how my times stack up. I usually run twice a week and at the moment cover 10 miles a session, and cover the distance in about 75 mins with some comfort.

dale1968 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish: depends on terrain, conditions, accuracy half a mile wrong means a lot in running, all said sounds good do some road races and see what % you finish in 10 5 1 top that is, will give you an idea
mitchell1982 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to dale1968: all my running is done on the roads around my home, most of the distance is up hill or on the flat.the distance i work out from a mapping web site.
tonanf - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish: i run v.occasionally and do 5 miles in 30 to 35 mins, on v.hilly roads. your time is good.
Trangia - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish:

Are you male or female? Age?
dale1968 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish: A good race time for 10 is under an hour, race and you will see how fit you are :)
lost1977 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish:

pretty good speed, if my calculations are correct that would be looking at a 40 min 10k which is very respectable
mitchell1982 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Trangia: male and 30 years old
parkovski - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish:

Agree with dale.

A good benchmark can be to get within 50% of the course record for any race. I think the world record for 10 miles on a flat road course is just under 45 mins, so you're not ridiculously far off that (assuming it's flat). Just set yourself the goal of going under 70 mins to start with.
Trangia - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish:

That's an encouraging pace. If you can do this as a newbie and without competition you have potential for good 10k or half marathon times with structured training. Have you considered joining a running club?
andy - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to tonanf:
> (In reply to weirdfish) i run v.occasionally and do 5 miles in 30 to 35 mins, on v.hilly roads. your time is good.

Really? That's very quick, specially if it's hilly. When i was doing a lot of running (c37min 10k, 80min half, winning the occasional age group race) I could just about break 30 minutes for 5 miles in a flattish race (that's sub-6 minute milling). Training I'd rarely run much quicker than 7:30 pace. You should start racing.
Al Evans on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to andy: 7 min miling will result in a Marathon time just over 3 hous.
Al Evans on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Al Evans: Sorry, that should say 3 hours.
Liam M - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to dale1968:
> (In reply to weirdfish) A good race time for 10 is under an hour, race and you will see how fit you are :)

I'd consider that a very good time. For a lot of local 10s you'd be in the top handful of places if you could do a sub-60 10. I can think of maybe 2 or 3 runners from our club of 100+ who could manage it.
mitchell1982 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Trangia:Iím not really interested by racing; Iím more the Eddie Izzard school of thought. Plus most of the serious runners Iíve see are doing the full terminator and equipment that cost more than my car.
Liam M - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish: Where are you spotting these serious runners - most around here sport a vest, shorts, socks and shoes, except at this time of year where they may adopt a long sleeve Tshirt!
andy - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Liam M:
> (In reply to weirdfish) Where are you spotting these serious runners - most around here sport a vest, shorts, socks and shoes, except at this time of year where they may adopt a long sleeve Tshirt!

And a woolly hat, for those of us without much hair.
Trangia - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish:

One thing I'd add - don't skimp on price when it comes to buying running shoes. The wrong sort will lead to knee and other injuries, that's what happened to me in my mid 40's and I had to give up running. Be prepared to fork out for good shoes and get advice from a sports shoe fitter who whows what they are doing.
mitchell1982 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Liam M:The most expensive piece of equipment I use for running is a 25 pound pair of trainers that have now seen better day. I use a t shirt I got free from work and an old pair of climbing shorts. Compared to the runners I seen wearing 100 pound plus running shoes, various gps watches and helly hansen running cloths. To name some of the things Iíve seen.
IainRUK - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish:

I have the GPS watch.. trainers £45 - £70 depending on sales, shorts £15 tops £10-25 depending on weather..

generally its only the trail running and ultra running which is now huge high fashion..

I'm starting to think it must be illegal to run an ultra without compression wear...
andy - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to IainRUK:
> (In reply to weirdfish)

>
> generally its only the trail running and ultra running which is now huge high fashion..
>
> I'm starting to think it must be illegal to run an ultra without compression wear...

We had a chuckle when the Coniston tri had the run leg over Wetherlam and the Old Man - visions of triathletes stumbling the clag around in compression socks and sunglasses...
Irk the Purist - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish:

Are you looking for a biscuit!? My shoes cost £100 because i buy them from shops not the internet. My tights or shorts cost £20, my tshirts are all free if you ignore i paid a fee to race to get it. My socks are pennies but I do have a £250 gps watch.

Am I less worthy?

Your pace imo is good overall but about average off the back of 1000 miles of running for a 30 year old male. If you structure your training you should be able to get it down further.
mitchell1982 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Eric the Red: Thanks, I would like a biscuit. A chocolate hob nob would be nice. I made no comment on the amount of money people send on their equipment or their worth as people. Iíve only been running 10 months nowhere near 1000ís of mile yet.
Ridge - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish:
I'll take the possibly unpopular view of "Does it really matter?"
In the past I did get focused on times and pace, and I ended up with all sorts of niggling injuries, general fatigue, seriously knackered achilles' and a dread of putting on my trainers in case I was a few seconds too slow halfway round a run.
I now leave the watch at home, and feel a lot better for it.
stewart murray - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish: Billy Bland reputedly ran 6 minute miles on the final road stretch of the Bob Graham round, which I think could safely be considered fast!
Irk the Purist - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish:

You did make a comment on the costs. I considered the comments a bit sneery although granted that could at most be implied. You said you've run twice a week at 10 miles a go, which is 1000 miles this year.

I gave you my opinion on your current pace and gave advice on getting it down, if you wanted to. As you asked.



mitchell1982 - on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to Eric the Red:
i haven't been running 20 miles aweek since i started.I built up to that. i started running only 2 miles and uped the distance by 0.5 of a mile every 2 weeeks.which would work out at about 500-600 miles.
Uluru on 12 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish: I would say on the good side of average. Some of the guys who run in our Welsh Castles Relay only run a few times leading up to that and consistently manage 1:15 for 12 relatively undulating miles. Like some others have said take a look at some race times and see how you times compare.
rgbritton - on 12 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish:

http://www.parkrun.org.uk/

Go have a jog at one of these and see how you compare with others. Racing may not be for everyone but it helps with training to have a goal and something to build towards as otherwise motivation will eventually dwindle.

70 minutes for 10 miles is good training pace, definately could be increased with some speed work and structured training.

As for expensive gear, I get laughed at for turning up at my club in girls hoodies, baggy shorts, random stripy socks and with a 6 euro wristw*tch. I'm still the quickest one there ;) Do invest in a top quality headband though, they make you faster.
Alex1 - on 20 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish:

Based on 10k on road which is a reasonably standard distance:

For a male runner no age adjustment
sub 60mins - entry level, just above jogging
sub 50mins - average runner
sub 40mins - reasonably keen runner
sub 36mins - decent club level approaching top 10 in many races
30-35mins - serious, would be winning things
sub 30 - top level of amateur

Probably far too basic but hopefully a pointer
mick.h on 20 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish:

I always used to think that 6 min miles was the difference between "runners" and "joggers" - i'd be somewhere between the 2 generally.
My daughter did a 7:40 mile a couple of months ago - she's 9. To say that I was proud doesn't cover it. First out of 81 by at least 10 seconds.
marmot hunter - on 20 Dec 2012
In reply to mick.h:
For reasonable runners I reckon 1h plus age is a respectable 1/2 marathon time.
pec on 20 Dec 2012
In reply to weirdfish:

> i haven't been running 20 miles aweek since i started.I built up to that. i started running only 2 miles and uped the distance by 0.5 of a mile every 2 weeeks.which would work out at about 500-600 miles. >

Think about what you want to achieve. If you just enjoy doing 10 mile runs then carry on but if you want to run them faster you need to do vary your training with a lot of shorter runs and ideally reps, ie. some structure to your training.
For someone with no running background, 7:30 miles over 10 miles is very good, you've got potential.

mick.h on 20 Dec 2012
In reply to marmot hunter:

last time I did the GNR it was 1 hr 24...... today I guess 2 hrs. Whatever, so long as its not pain...
marmot hunter - on 20 Dec 2012
In reply to mick.h:
Are you 36 years older? ;)
marmot hunter - on 20 Dec 2012
In reply to marmot hunter:
When I was 34 I did 1h 34, last year at 44years old I did 1h 43. Helps me think I'm doing OK.
mick.h on 20 Dec 2012
In reply to marmot hunter:

No, 15 years and 2 kids older. I love them loads but running is not always top of the agenda.......
marmot hunter - on 20 Dec 2012
In reply to mick.h:
As long as I'm not in pain - very true.
Inbetween my 1.34 and 1.43 I had spinal surgery and spent 6 months unable to walk to the front door.

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