/ sport climbing

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legendchris23 - on 08 Dec 2012
been climbing indoors for 3 months now and just mastered the grade of 7A, does that apply to out door rock climbing? im going out door sport climbing next week and don't wanna be in over my head because the climb is a 6b+ and wanted to make sure the grade applied to outdoor climbing as I have to drive over 100 miles to get there :/ any advise will be helpful :)
happy_c - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23: On my limited experience, its nothing like it what so ever! Indoors is a lot easier, the holds are bright and stick out, outdoors they dont, you have to figure out what a hold is and isnt!
red.stiletto - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23:
I agree that it is very different. I have seen good outdoor sport climbers struggle indoors anywhere near their grade. Personally I found outdoor harder when I first made the move from indoor just because of the difference and the exposure.
legendchris23 - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to happy_c: have done limited outdoor climbing and can tell (kinda) between a good hold and not a good hold but nothing at this kinda level I just don't wanna get there and not be able to climb it!!
idiotproof (Buxton MC) - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23:

There are only 2 grades in climbing, the routes you can climb and....
legendchris23 - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to idiotproof (Buxton MC): but the climbs you originally cant climb at first may become a walk in the park after a few attempts!!???
GridNorth - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23: I climbed with a guy who regularly climbed 6c indoors and got up quite a few 7a's but was so baffled by outdoor climbing that he consistently fell off 6a's and wouldn't even attempt a 6b. He admitted that he could not "read" the routes. There is only one way to find out.
ripper - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23: also don't forget you'll have to put your own draws in (if you're leading), and the clips will likely be a fair bit further apart...
legendchris23 - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth: well hopefully I will have a good climb cheers for the advise :)
legendchris23 - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to ripper: I have been practicing putting my own draws in on easier climbs and think im getting the hang of it I have managed a few 6a climbs near me but mostly 5+ just to get used to the difference from indoor to outdoor
legendchris23 - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to red.stiletto: thanks for the advise done a few outdoor solo climbs not at a high grade and that's what got me into indoor climbing as at the time I couldn't afford to buy all the outdoor gear
GridNorth - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23: 7a indoors is impressive after 3 months. When you say mastered what do you mean? Do you regularly lead 7a?
legendchris23 - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth: done my grading after completing all 7a walls there and they decided to create a wall at a high level 7a but not quite a 7b to see if I could do it and after several fails I eventually managed it lol
GridNorth - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23: I think that you may be in for a very rude awakening.
happy_c - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23: I maybe completely wrong but i doubt youl get up that for your first climb, I find there is such a difference between the two, are you just going somewhere for one route in particular, sounds like a short day? Also its pretty damn cold, have you climbed outside on cold? What about if you hit a wet patch?

lots of things to consider, and personally id try and find somewhere with a few easy ones to practise on, that way your not let down!
happy_c - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth: Agreed! I climbed at that sort of grade inside, bouldered inside at about V7 quite consitantly, first sport climb at malham, around 6b but could be wrong. Ill put in quite bluntly, in climbing terms i got raped, took some very long falls, faffing with draws as to be honest i was fecked, took some falls with lots of slack. it wasnt pleasent and put me of outdoor climbing for a while, then i got into trad, and rather than pushing grades found how much i enjoy climbing at any grade!
legendchris23 - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to happy_c: no it has over 30 routes but the 6b looks like the climb for me and I want it!!! but there are easier routes if I fail straight away
legendchris23 - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth: I hope so I like to fail lots!!! makes me want the climb more!!!!
happy_c - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23: not when your belayers hands are that cold he struggles catching you! Or your catching the rocks on the way down, not all outside walls are as overhanging as indoor, falls can hurt, a lot!
legendchris23 - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to happy_c: I am aiming for trad bot putting in your own safety has got to be worse than using sport holds?
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Daniel Heath - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23:

have fun! Start off easy, I loved the movement when I started outdoor sport, but found the bolt spacing a bit scary.
legendchris23 - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to Daniel Heath: so far im not scared of falling or failure so hopefully the spacing wont effect me as long as I don't hit the ground :/
mrchewy - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23: Just to put another slant on it - I climb better outside than indoors, there just seems so much more choice for holds and movement. Not by much but definitely better.
legendchris23 - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to mrchewy: that's what I thought but then out doors you will always try and pick the better holds which isn't always the best thing is it?
Daniel Heath - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23:

That's a good attitude (as long as you're safe). Fear of falling is what holds most people back, so a bit of confidence will give you the advantage.
legendchris23 - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to Daniel Heath: that was my worry at first until I gained trust in my rope and belayer now I will hop from hold to hold without a worry in the world! :)
ashley1_scott - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23:
Can I ask, what centre did you do all the 7a's at. As I wish to know what centre is that nice to a single climber that they would put up a 7a+ just to see if they can climb it.
Most centres that I have climbed at (9 different centres with roped climbs) tend to have at least a few routes in the mid 7's and normally an 8a or two, depending on if any of the GB squad live near by.
GridNorth - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23: I would suggest that you "learn to climb" before venturing outdoors. After just 3 months I would doubt vey much that you have developed sufficient technique to climb efficiently but rather rely on a good strength to weight ratio and huge amounts of adrenalin. Climbing without good technique will at some point land you into trouble outdoors where you have to contend with all the things others have mentioned. Use the cold weather to practice clipping and climbing in good style indoors.
Jamie B - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23:


There's a surprising amount of negativity in the responses here. Just get out there and give it a go, see how you adapt to it and enjoy. You definitely want to keep the grades down while you get your head around it; if you can find a crag with F5s to warm up on that would be sensible. Once you've learned the lingo of sport-climbing on real rock there will be plenty of time to start pushing the grades.
Jamie B - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23:

> I am aiming for trad but putting in your own safety has got to be worse than using sport holds?

Depends what you mean by "worse". Yes, you have to protect yourself, but this can be done very safely with practice, it is not the sketchy dark art than some will suggest. The flip side is that to allow yourself a safe margin you will normally climb on easier routes, certainly initially. This of course may or may not be a positive.

JLS on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23:

The grades should feel about the same indoors and out. Initially they will feel harder until you master the various subtleties of climbing on rock rather than plastic but if you accept there is a bit of a learning curve, you'll get there.

You might have enough fitness in hand to flash your F6b but if not just go about it systematically ie spend time finding where all the holds are, chalk 'em up, try lots of different ways (even weird ways) to do the moves before deciding what's the best way.
GridNorth - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Jamie Bankhead: I didn't mean to come across as negative but on reflection perhaps it is, a little. I was just trying to manage expectations as it would be very easy to be put off altogether with loose, cold conditions and spaced protection.
To the OP: Starting out on low grade routes is very good advice, don't go straight on the 6b no matter how much you want it.
jkarran - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23:

Go see how you get on, can't really say any more than that gradewise. If you take a clipstick (and know how to use it) there's no worry about getting out of your depth and losing gear, failures just become potential projects. Make sure you're familiar with lowering off safely and consider helmets, lower grade limestone sport in the uk isn't known for its rock quality!

jk
ian Ll-J - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth:
> (In reply to legendchris23) I would suggest that you "learn to climb" before venturing outdoors.

Does anyone learn to climb outdoors anymore?
JLS on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to ian Ll-J:

>"Does anyone learn to climb outdoors anymore?"

Does it really matter? I was taught climbing by other club members one winter on an old style brick indoor wall climbing the mortar joints and missing brick holes. Seemed a better idea than being instructed by torch light in a cold, dark, damp quarry.
Jamie B - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to GridNorth:

Wasn't singling you or anyone else out, and much of what you touched on is relevant. Just concerned that the overall balance of the posts wasn't very enthusiastic!
I like climbing - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23:
Hi there ! This is what I think. Great that you've started so well but it is different outside as others have mentioned. However, what I've found is that my outside grade and my inside grade are very similar, but I've been climbing for 17 years. The question is how fast will it take you to adapt to outside ....The head game, techniques etc all change.
Hope it goes well and enjoy it.
John Stainforth - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23:

Here's another vote for starting outside at a very modest grade relative to your (indoor) ability. The most effective way of reaching your real limit is by climbing up through the grades, focussing on climbing as well as possible rather than getting up at any cost. This way you will find the climbing enjoyable and satisfying, whereas if you go in over your head you may be demoralised.

The main difference between indoor and outdoor climbing is that real rock is much more intricate with generally a much broader range of sizes of holds and far more of the really small subtle stuff. Climbing walls are not the best training for footwork, whereas on real rock footwork is usually all-important. Amongst the important skills on real rock - that are not at all well learned at climbing walls - are slab-climbing (on really small to non-existent holds) and crack climbing in all its varieties, which is pretty fundamental to climbing longer mountain routes.

Although it sounds as though you want to focus on sport climbing, may I suggest that you do some trad leading as well. You can't always rely on conveniently spaced pieces of fixed gear in the rock.
GridNorth - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23: I honestly think that you should get outdoors at the earliest opportunity Too much indoor climbing can encourages bad habits.
Paul Hy - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23: climbing on plastic is for when it's raining. imho.
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Dave 88 - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to legendchris23:

Can't be arsed to read all the other replies but I say just go for it. Who cares how far you have to drive or if you even get up the route, I guarantee you'll enjoy it.

My first time outdoors I drove for an hour just to climb a tiny chossy VDiff on a rope solo method that would've almost certainly failed if I fell. On the drive home my car broke down. I was still absolutely chuffed to bits!
mandingo - on 13 Dec 2012
In reply to Jamie Bankhead:

aye jamie - ur da man

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