/ Beastmaker Hangboard - Do You Need a backboard?

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Alex Newton - on 12 Dec 2012
Hi,

I was thinking of getting a beastmaker 1000 series hang board for Christmas.
I was wondering do you need a backboard for it, or can you drill and screw it straight into the wall?

On their website it only comes with screws for installation, but no backboard or anything, so is it necessary?

This might be a stupid question, but answers would really help!

Thanks,
Alex
shark - on 12 Dec 2012
In reply to Alex Newton:

No
NorthernGrit - on 12 Dec 2012
In reply to Alex Newton:

I think a more realistic answer is - it depends entirely on the wall.
alooker - on 12 Dec 2012
In reply to Alex Newton: depends on how solid your wall is! If it's thick enough then you can screw the beastmaker directly on, if not then screwing it onto a backboard first allows you to then screw the backboard into two solid joists
Scott K - on 13 Dec 2012
In reply to Alex Newton: As the guys have said. I put mine into the wall but I could feel it moving so mounted on a backboard and then got it into the joists and a dwang. It is solid now.
PeterJuggler - on 13 Dec 2012
In reply to Alex Newton:
Adding a backboard adds strength to the mounting, but the other reason you might want one is to stop your fingers going over the edge of the board when using the slopers, as that would make them a lot easier to hang.
Would you be drilling it directly into a wall above a door or other opening? If not then your legs will be against the wall so you won't be able to hang in properly. A better idea would be to construct a frame that sticks out from the wall with a backboard to attach the beastmaker to. Look at the beastmaker mounting guide.
Ian Patterson on 13 Dec 2012
In reply to Alex Newton:

You don't absolutely need a backboard but I think it can be easier if you have one - you reduce the risk of problems with any individual fixing point causing issues.

I got a piece of ply significantlt larger than the the board for 5 from a DIY shop, fixed it above a door with plenty of screws into heavy duty rawl plugs, painted it to match the wall then attached the fingerboard - all very simple and secure.
Emma Reynolds - on 14 Dec 2012
In reply to Alex Newton: I would start off with a sparrow maker, build up to snall terrier Maker, then on to the snall fluffy animal maker. Finally move up to a beastmaker.
Fraser on 14 Dec 2012
In reply to Emma Reynolds:

Mk. II Sparrowmaker I assume? (the Mk. I's are effectively a posh Mousemaker.)
dnyc - on 30 Dec 2012
In reply to Alex Newton:

Hey Alex,

If it's any help I got this training station: http://seriousclimbing.com/products/detail/compact-training-station

And bolted my beastmaker to it. It fits to most door frames with out causing any damage. Quick and fast to fit also. You can see a pic here if you want: http://db.tt/7ZFxyLDt

It's a little pricey but it helped me keep training through a rubbish situation.

Overall I'm happy with it. Plenty of room for improvement though.

/Danny
BarrySW19 on 31 Dec 2012
In reply to Alex Newton:

Basically, it depends on what your walls are made of. If you have a brick wall to screw into you probably won't need a backboard (but you will probably need different screws and wall-plugs to those supplied). If you have plasterboard you will need to find the joists behind and screw a backboard to them. If, like me you have plaster and lathe above the door frames then you probably need to fix a backboard to the door frame (either with the kit as in the other reply, or - cheaper - with the way I did it as shown in these photos).

http://i111.photobucket.com/albums/n125/BarryNL/fix2_zps4c689150.jpg

http://i111.photobucket.com/albums/n125/BarryNL/fix1_zpsf4bc2699.jpg

Cheers, Barry.
MonkeyPuzzle - on 31 Dec 2012
In reply to Alex Newton:

I thought adding a backboard helped by making the fingerboard stand proud of the doorway. I used a B&Q budget shelf, which was the perfect size.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Kevin Woods - on 31 Dec 2012
In reply to Alex Newton: I bought a sheet of wood from B&Q and mounted it since I've got a partition wall where mine hangs. Even though it's pinewood (bit bendy), once the Beastmaker was in place the whole thing really became rigid. Big advantage is it helps it sit out from the door frame a bit more.

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