/ Norwegian Alpine guidebook advice

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pec on 18 Dec 2012
I may go to Norway next summer for a multi activity trip, rock climbing, walking and mountaineering. I'm also short of christmas present ideas so I though a guidebook might be suitable. These 2 look like decent tomes and appear from my limited knowledge to cover roughly the same area.
http://www.needlesports.com/Catalogue/Books-Maps-DVDs/Foreign-Climbing-Guides/Europe/Scandinavia-Ice...
http://www.needlesports.com/Catalogue/Books-Maps-DVDs/Foreign-Climbing-Guides/Europe/Scandinavia-Ice...
Has anyone used either or both of them and could offer any advice on which is the better?
Thanks.
Simon Caldwell - on 18 Dec 2012
In reply to pec:
The two areas are about 3 or 4 hours apart.

I've used the Hurringane book, and it's very good, though rather expensive for its size. The assessments of difficulty seemed a bit inconsistent, but that could be due to the wide variety of weather we had (from hot sun to lots of snow, all in August). I'll certainly buy other books in the series if they're ever published.

You can see what the book's like on the author's website
http://www.scandinavianmountains.com/areas/01-hurrungane/index.htm
Joe G - on 18 Dec 2012
In reply to Toreador:
I've used the Hurrungane book too, only for one route, an easy scramble that seemed to be overly described in the guide. Not that I'm complaining, I'd rather not bother using a guidebook that has loads of detail than struggle to find a route with one that's sorely lacking in info. Good book, strange mix of guide / coffee table book feel to it, I'll have to return and make more use of it!
Simon Caldwell - on 18 Dec 2012
In reply to Joe G:
> an easy scramble that seemed to be overly described in the guide

as is usually the way with scrambling guides for some reason.

we used it mainly for inspiration/logistics and it served well for both. The main problem was that it only covers the a small part of Jotunheimen, most people spending a holiday there are likely to go to other parts as well. Worth downloading loads of stuff from his website to cover this.
Doug on 18 Dec 2012
In reply to Joe G: if the author is the guy I used to know of the same name (who was a bit of an expert on things Norwegian), he's more of a skier/walker than climber
Blunderbuss - on 18 Dec 2012
In reply to pec:

If you want a copy of the the book these other guys are on about I am willing to sell my copy which is in excellent condition.

drop me a mail if interested.
Simon Caldwell - on 18 Dec 2012
pec on 19 Dec 2012
In reply to Toreador:
> (In reply to pec)
> The two areas are about 3 or 4 hours apart. >

> You can see what the book's like on the author's website
http://www.scandinavianmountains.com/areas/01-hurrungane/index.htm >

That's a really useful looking website, thaks for the link.
If the areas are separate but close perhaps I should get both books.
Has anybody used the Romsdal book?

Blunderbuss - on 19 Dec 2012
In reply to pec:

I have replied to your mail.


Iain Thow - on 19 Dec 2012
In reply to Toreador:
> (In reply to Joe G)
> [...]
>
> re: "as is usually the way with scrambling guides for some reason"

>As someone who's written a scrambling guide, the reason for the detail is that although many users are experienced climbers (yourself included judging by your profile) many are "adventurous walkers" who are just beginning to venture out onto more serious ground and are much less confident on it. The idea is to direct those people clearly to the easiest line, anyone else is obviously free to look for more difficulty. Also, on the linking-outcrops-on-the-way-up-hillsides routes the idea is to point out where the best fun is, so again you end up putting in lots of description. People always have the option of looking at the general line, ignoring the detail and just following their nose (or not buying the guidebook!), so better to include it than not. Just my opinion, but I suspect Noel Williams/Brian Evans/Dan Bailey etc work on much the same logic. Happy clambering. Iain
Kid Spatula - on 19 Dec 2012
In reply to pec:

Hmm wanna go to Hurrungane now! Is it an easy area to get to and around minus a car? And in say June?
pec on 19 Dec 2012
In reply to Kid Spatula:
> (In reply to pec)
>
> Hmm wanna go to Hurrungane now! Is it an easy area to get to and around minus a car? And in say June? >

I don't know, I've not been yet but it does look good!
Torreador may know, check out his link
http://www.scandinavianmountains.com/index.htm
There's some stuff on public transport under the "introduction" heading.

Simon Caldwell - on 19 Dec 2012
In reply to Iain Thow:
> many are "adventurous walkers" who are just beginning to venture out onto more serious ground

I came into climbing via the walking -> scrambling -> climbing route, but have never found detailed descriptions to be anything other than confusing. All that's needed IMO are details of how to get to the start, which ironically is where many guides are lacking.
Blunderbuss - on 19 Dec 2012
In reply to pec:


Can you check your mail again mate.
Iain Thow - on 21 Dec 2012
In reply to Toreador: I always put in the grid ref for the start, an approach description and a brief character summary for the route. Feel free to ignore the rest if that's your bag (or just don't buy the guides).
Simon Caldwell - on 21 Dec 2012
In reply to Iain Thow:
> or just don't buy the guides

not buy guidebooks? Sorry, I don't understand that concept ;-)
davidbeynon - on 21 Dec 2012
In reply to Toreador:
> (In reply to Iain Thow)
> [...]
>
> not buy guidebooks? Sorry, I don't understand that concept ;-)

Yeah. Bit of a weird one that :)
Iain Thow - on 21 Dec 2012
In reply to Toreador: Yeah, I'm an addict too. Need more shelf space. And more time to do the routes in them!
Regin - on 31 Dec 2012
In reply to pec:
Save yourself the trouble and get a car. There are busses to TurtagrÝ, but you will want the flexibility of a car, the norwegian weather being what is is... Every summer I see tourists with enormous backpacks trying to hitch rides in drizling rain. It doesn't look like fun.
In reply to Iain Thow: Sure do Iain. Happy New Year
James Baxter - on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to Kid Spatula: Fly to Oslo. Take the bus that goes from the Airport to Lom. Changes buses here and continue to Sognefell and Turtagro and the world is your oyster. Getting a car to Norway or renting one there for a week will be at least a grand. Don't go in June- too much rock to ski and to much snow to walk. Instead go in May with skis or July with climbing boots. Hope you enjoy it. James
James Baxter - on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to Doug: Is that Doug from Aberdeen neck of the woods?.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Doug on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to James Baxter: I was in Aberdeen most of the 1980s, mostly as a postgrad student. Now in France

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