/ can you take a used msr/multi fuel stove on a plane.

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climbercool - on 19 Dec 2012
can you take a used msr/multi fuel stove on a plane?
looking at flying to Argentina, can i take my stove?
CENSORED - on 19 Dec 2012
In reply to climbercool: depends on the airline & how well you've cleaned it in my experience.
Pursued by a bear - on 19 Dec 2012
In reply to climbercool: Empty it, wash it with hot water and fairy liquid, dry it in a warm place and pack it dismantled. On arrival, explain what you've got and what you've done.

Leastways, that's worked for me.

T.
climbercool - on 19 Dec 2012
In reply to climbercool:
thanks for the help, reckon ill do as you say and hope for the best. Ben
Edradour - on 19 Dec 2012
In reply to climbercool:

I've taken mine on loads of planes without anything like this amount of hassle. Always in the hold mind.

Don't take a full fuel bottle and you'll be fine.
seaofdreams - on 19 Dec 2012

short legal answer - no

but i carry mine all the time.......

If you want to clean it and the bottle don't bother with fairy - separate and dismantle put it in the oven under low heat for a few hours (take the washers out first).

dont breathe in when you open the door.

you may lose the bottle due to the nature of the writing on it. i havent yet.
AndyC - on 19 Dec 2012
In reply to climbercool:

I've done it several times to Argentina, Chile and Peru. No problems on international or domestic flights. Washed out the bottles with soap and water, left the lids off in the bag. Otherwise didn't do anything special with the stove itself.
Patrick G - on 19 Dec 2012
Andes - on 19 Dec 2012
In reply to climbercool:

Never had any trouble. As someone else has said put it in the hold baggage and don't take any fuel with you.
John
Email or PM me if you've any questions about climbing in Argentina
ScraggyGoat on 19 Dec 2012
I cleaned a bottle out with soap and water and vented for a few days ahead once, the hold baggage x-ray handlers spotted it and called me back through security. They would let the bottle on, nor would they let me take the pump either...caused a lot of hassle on the trip
AndyC - on 19 Dec 2012
In reply to ScraggyGoat:
> I cleaned a bottle out with soap and water and vented for a few days ahead once, the hold baggage x-ray handlers spotted it and called me back through security.

North American airport by any chance?

"You can't bring that beef jerky into the US"
"I'm in transit, I'm not bringing it in, just passing through"
"Don't matter, you can't bring it in here"
"But it says 'made in USA' on the bag"
"It'll have to be destroyed..."
captain paranoia - on 20 Dec 2012
In reply to seaofdreams:

> Great atmosphere around there at the moment.

Slightly longer legal answer: provided you follow IATA guidelines on ensuring it's clear of fuel, you should be able to take it.

The problem is that, for all the IATA guidelines*, the airline is still able to impose its own rules. The best idea is to try to find out from the airline what these rules are, comply with them, and take a printed copy of the rules with you to show at check-in.

* see here:

http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?t=156636
Pursued by a bear - on 20 Dec 2012
In reply to captain paranoia:

> Slightly longer legal answer: provided you follow IATA guidelines on ensuring it's clear of fuel, you should be able to take it.

Some excellent points made here. To follow on from this, and pick up on one or two other made previously, for someone on check-in 'clear of fuel' won't just mean 'has no fuel in it' but is likely to mean as well 'and doesn't smell of fuel at all, even a little bit'; hence my recommendation to wash and dry thoroughly. It's easier to do this in advance than go to the expense and inconvenience of buying a new stove on arrival because the handlers wouldn't let you bring yours with you.

As also advised, showing that you know about the guidelines and making this clear to everyone before they ask you about things can help a lot.

T.

Little AndyH - on 20 Dec 2012
In reply to climbercool:

I've done it plenty of times, I normally just put it in the oven on a low heat for an hour or so to get rid of all the petrol residue. Works for the stove and the fuel bottle
redsonja - on 20 Dec 2012
In reply to climbercool: i have taken my pocket rocket loads of times but recently go told i couldnt take it at liverpool airport and had to bin it. it was in my hold bag and they scanned the bag and asked what it was. they didnt appear to have a clue what it was- they even asked me what my boli in the bag meals were and what my camera was! when i went to patagonia i took 11 different flights with the stove and they were all fine. im sure you will be fine going to argentina- just dont fly from liverpool
Adam Long - on 20 Dec 2012
In reply to climbercool:

Flown with mine a bunch of times, mostly with no problems. The one time it was a problem, not surprisingly, was in the US. Security had been briefed that it could not fly if there was any smell of fuel - despite flushing with water he said he could still smell fuel... and suggested we try Coca-cola. Which we did, not without irritation, and were then allowed to fly.

Since then I've always taken the step of loading a cleaned, empty fuel bottle, pressurising it, turning the stove on and letting it run through - ie flushing the stove with air. Seems to remove fuel smells better than water.
ice.solo - on 21 Dec 2012
In reply to climbercool:

Ive done the cola trick.
Just remember to flush with water after.

ads.ukclimbing.com
jkarran - on 21 Dec 2012
In reply to climbercool:

Call them and ask but last time I tried the situation was stove yes, fuel bottle no. I could take the fuel bottle if it had been 'chemically cleansed' but since nobody was willing to take responsibility for elaborating on exactly what that meant their policy was no fuel bottles.

jk

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