/ Cape wrath trail

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rodw - on 26 Dec 2012
Sitting in armchair thinking about cape wrath trail and wondering which is the best guide to buy and use, anyone done this trek if so which guide did you use and any advice would be welcome
Jack B on 26 Dec 2012
In reply to rodw:

I did most of it a good few years ago. There is (was?) no well defined route, and I didn't use a guide of any type. Just buy the right landrangers and go for it. Planning the route is all part of the fun. There are some lovely MBA bothies on route, and the MBA website now gives grid refs.

I did find it useful to send a few items 'Post Restante' to Kylesku post office - there are shops out there, but they don't stock everything a walker might want.

You should also check with the MOD before going to cape wrath, it's a military firing range. http://www.capewrath.org.uk/08_MOD_Exercise_Info.htm

Have fun!
rodw - on 26 Dec 2012
In reply to Jack B: thanks for that will start researching , as you so rightly say more fun if you do the planning and thanks for tip re bothies and Kylesku post office
Ben Sharp - on 26 Dec 2012
In reply to rodw: I think there's a guide coming out this next year, google it and you'll come up with about 3 websites that are of use. But as you said, planning is part of the fun with that kind of route.
ScraggyGoat on 26 Dec 2012
In reply to rodw:

On a very wet, windy and crap w/e I cycled into a NW bothy, away from any munros and corbets, and lacking a fire place. We'd get it to ourselves, we thought. On arrival I was greeted by an American lady, dooing the 'trail' and reading the 'guidebook'. An hour later a mini-bus pulled up outside on the estate land-drover track, the lady driver got out and came in for a chat, while she waited for a party of 10 or so walkers 'dooing' the 'trail' supported, and would be transported by her to their feather beds for the night. Duly the wet party of ten trooped in. An little later a party of three poncho-ed German lads walked through the door. They were also dooing the 'trail', and after a cuppa set off towards another bothy which was the end-point of their previous years attempt.

Amazing how appealing two guidebooks can make a bit of Highland bog.....granted it does pass through some grand areas as well.
Jack Frost - on 26 Dec 2012
In reply to rodw:

If you can get BBC2 Scotland, there's a prog about it on 28th Dec@19:00:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01pps8y

note that episode is the 2nd part. The first part covers Kirk Yetholm to Aberfeldy to be shown on 27th Dec.

I walked the first 30odd miles of the CW trail back in October '97 from FW to Cluanie Inn. Then last year I continued from Cluanie to Strathcarron. I'll reach CW by the time I retire at this rate.
pigeonjim on 26 Dec 2012
In reply to rodw:
The best thing about the cape wrath trail is there is no set path. Just get some maps and find your route. Just remember to think about where shops are as you can be days without them. I would suggest west from the fort to glenfinnan then north through Knoydart. We spent a LONG time planning our trip but didnt make it to the end due to an injury. Maybe another time :-)
ScraggyGoat on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to pigeonjim:
Unfortuneately its very hard to sell a guidebook that doesn't provide a route......so one of the two guidebooks avialable provides a route (along with some alternatives), including summary maps showing thier 'route' per section. The other guidebook doesn't, I wonder if the author has walked the route.......not having finishing his corbets (allegedly) didn't stop him publishing a book describing the 'best way up each' ........
OwenM - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to rodw: A couple of years ago some friends and I kayaked into Sourlies bothy at the end of Loch Nevis. Here we meet a middle-aged couple who were attempting this walk,they thought it was an extension to the West Highland Way which they'd done the year before. They had left Fort William a week earlier and had been lost in Glen Dessarry for three days. The lady was close to exhaustion, hobbling along with the aid of a stick, her husband wasn't in much better shape. They were hoping to follow the coast back to Mallaig, when we told them that this wasn't really an option they almost cried. We advised them to head inland and down Glen Meadail to Inverie and get the ferry back. Couldn't help but feel sorry for them, they'd been looking forward to this adventure all winter and it had turned into a nightmare.
Turdus torquatus on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to rodw:

The David Paterson book is available second-hand for about 10. It isn't a guide book as such, but has some inspirational photographs and writing, as well as some overview maps.

The Scottish National Trail mentioned above looks to take a different route to that suggested by Paterson.

I'm not a fan of McNeish's guide books.
pigeonjim on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to Turdus torquatus:
> (In reply to rodw)

> I'm not a fan of McNeish's guide books.

Me neither and I think that hint about not walking his own routes may be aimed at him...
ScraggyGoat on 27 Dec 2012
> (In reply to Turdus torquatus)
> [...]
>
> [...]
>
> Me neither and I think that hint about not walking his own routes may be aimed at him...

....at a gentleman with a similar sounding name; Cambert McPish......

Erik B - on 28 Dec 2012
In reply to rodw: Iain Harper is the guy who has published a guidebook for the Cape Wrath Trail. seems there is a bit of a rammy going on in the trails business. Now we have the scottish national trail on national tv, which appears to contain a version of the cape wrath trail..

The original nature of the cape wrath trail appealed,ie, find your own way from A to B...one thing for sure is the sandwood bay experience will never be the same again after that program tonight!

Cuthbert on 29 Dec 2012
In reply to Erik B:

I don't mind McNeish but it may be irrelevant anyway as the MOD wants to buy more of Cape Wrath and close it to the public. Better Together - aye right.
Dirk Didler - on 29 Dec 2012
In reply to Saor Alba:
> (In reply to Erik B)
>
> I don't mind McNeish but it may be irrelevant anyway as the MOD wants to buy more of Cape Wrath and close it to the public. Better Together - aye right.

lol
In reply to Saor Alba: ...So in a free Scotland no one will ever do anything you disapprove of? Aye right
Steve Perry - on 29 Dec 2012
In reply to Turdus torquatus:
> (In reply to rodw)
>
> The Scottish National Trail mentioned above looks to take a different route to that suggested by Paterson.
>
Can I just correct you there, it's The Gore-Tex Scottish National Trail. Think Reebok Stadium or similar it helps me remember.

Fat Bumbly2 - on 29 Dec 2012
In reply to Dan Bailey - UKHillwalking.com:
"Closing" Parph would be politically ill advised right now, and I expect the War Office would delay doing something that would really infuriate folk here, at least until The Fat Politician loses his referendum. It would be a very aggressive act.

We have been here before, with Knoydart. Saw the bar stewards off then and will do so again. The threat will probably help Durness with their bid mind.

As for the trail - great to hear all the reminders that it is a journey, not a single linear route. Still smarting from hearing the claim that McPish "created" the Sutherland Trail. He did a good job of that lovely pony path to Gobernuisgach. Callum of Raasay had nothing on him.
Onam on 29 Dec 2012
In reply to rodw: I walked the part of the Cape Wrath trail from the head of Loch Eil using the guide written by Denis Brook and Phil Hinchcliffe called North to the Cape.Only went as far as Strathcarron.There is a good bunkhouse at Canas-Luinie on the way to Killilan. fully equipped with washer etc.Stayed first night in A Chuill bothy,Guidebook said do not cross the bridge over the river Pean but wish i had and gone up the forest track to the bothy so boggy the other way by Strathan.Good bothy and camping at Barrisdale.I used their variant route through Glen Quoich but very boggy with a long walk along the road to Shiel Bridge and would not recommend it. A challenge but I can't say I really enjoyed it.
nw - on 30 Dec 2012
In reply to Dan Bailey - UKHillwalking.com:
> (In reply to Saor Alba) ...So in a free Scotland no one will ever do anything you disapprove of? Aye right


Fool. Our glorious leader will protect the best interests of us all.
ads.ukclimbing.com
dek - on 30 Dec 2012
In reply to nw:
> (In reply to Dan Bailey - UKHillwalking.com)
> [...]
>
>
> Fool. Our glorious leader will protect the best interests of us all.
Glorious Fat Controller, will rename it, 'Ho Chi Minging Kleenex Trail'.Doubtful any of Scotland's politicians are up to the task of walking the trail. I see them bail into taxis to get to Waverly station after a hard days graft in the Parly, a mere fifteen minute walk away!

Robert Durran - on 30 Dec 2012
Cuthbert on 30 Dec 2012
In reply to nw:

I never quite understand this mentality, that of avoiding the issue but attacking someone for raising it. The MOD will buy the rest of Cape Wrath and treat it with the care they extent to the rest of the place - none.
Erik B - on 30 Dec 2012
In reply to Saor Alba: its bizzare how a govt organisation can purchase land for itself..

I like McNeish's stuff on tv, beats the x factor.. just wish he wouldnt tell the world about our currently quiet unspoiled gems.. (im selfish of course)
nw - on 30 Dec 2012
In reply to Saor Alba:
Not attacking you, just mocking your apparent belief that somehow in an independent Scotland all decisions will be made for the common good and that the environment will be more valued than it is now. We have just as many greedy, rapacious, mercenary politicians and decision makers as anywhere else.
Furthermore, many would argue that MOD landownership has been a net benefit for the ecology of most of the land that it owns.
Also, Alex Salmond rewminds me of Toad.
Cuthbert on 30 Dec 2012
In reply to nw:

Em, I didn't say that so not sure why you feel I believe it.

Also, I don't think "many" would argue that MOD ownership has been good for the ecology in any way. Who are these many? People in Durness don't seem to agree.

Either way, looks like the local and rest of population are about to lose a big chunk of land. Better Together - no.
Dr.S at work - on 30 Dec 2012
In reply to Saor Alba:
> (In reply to nw)
>

> Either way, looks like the local and rest of population are about to lose a big chunk of land. Better Together - no.

Where would the Independent Scottish armed forces train?

Would they host NATO exercises at cape wrath?
Cuthbert on 30 Dec 2012
In reply to Dr.S at work:

These are separate issues which you can discuss on a dedicated thread. The point I make is that regardless of who, we are are about to lose something.
nw - on 30 Dec 2012
In reply to Saor Alba:
Fair enough I was laying it on a bit thick.Sorry. I don't know much about Cape Wrath (naval gunnery, right?) but the big ranges I've been on like Otterburn and Sennybridge have significant areas of wood and moorland. Despite the occasional violent explosion, disruption to these habitats is actually less than in similar areas outwith ranges. This is because there is virtually no development and for large parts of the year not many people there at all.
IIRC some parts of Otterburn are SSI's.

I was in Durness earlier this year for the Cape Wrath Challenge and it is a lovely part of the world and I agree it needs looking after. I just don't think it's an Independence issue.
Cuthbert on 30 Dec 2012
In reply to nw:

It may be that you wont be able to do the Cape Wrath Challenge in the future.
Dr.S at work - on 31 Dec 2012
In reply to Saor Alba:
fine by me - you dragged the independence thing into the thread. If you keep putting in lines like you did then you have to expect a response.
rodw - on 31 Dec 2012
In reply to Robert Durran: thanks for your reply just what I needed stop dreaming and start planning. In the famous quote by W H Murray (when we commit etc)
blondel - on 31 Dec 2012
In reply to rodw:

I agree with Jack B - planning your own route is what makes the Cape Wrath Trail different from all the others. There are hill paths that will link up all the way through in a number of different combinations - and be sure to have a few alternative routes figured out in the more hairy places, too, in case things don't turn out the way you plan them, especially in the far north west, where there really are no safety nets. But what an adventure - highlights for me were a waterspout on Loch Stack, a rowdy flock of ptarmigans coming in to roost on Arkle after nightfall, and all that time alone in an awesome landscape.

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