/ Square boxes in the Loch Avon basin

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Ron Walker - on 27 Dec 2012
We thought we were seeing things but there are some large boxes or huts just below the Shelterstone! What are they and what are they doing there?
prog99 on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to Ron Walker:
Something to do with the path rebuilding going on in the area. Saw them in the summer.

http://www.prog99.com/Climbing%20in%20Scotland/2012/Clean%20Sweep%20-%20August%202012/slides/IMG_481...
k.shark - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to Ron Walker: It is indeed the huts of the path builders as my son was one of the path builders .
Ron Walker - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to k.shark:

It's the first I've heard of it and if the popularity of Ben MacDui path is anything to go by a bit worrying!
k.shark - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to Ron Walker: I used to hate all man made paths but they soon blend in better than multiple paths that scar some area's, and help stop erosion.
Ron Walker - on 27 Dec 2012
In reply to k.shark:

Not so much the paths but the fact that it encourages the less experienced and the resultant erosion and litter in what is one of Europe's last wild and pristine areas... A lot more erosion has been caused by the new Ben MacDui paths recently as it it encourages the casual tourists and now mountain bikers to go further into the Cairngorms than before...
Robert Durran - on 28 Dec 2012
In reply to Ron Walker:
> (In reply to k.shark)
>
> Not so much the paths but the fact that it encourages the less experienced and the resultant erosion and litter in what is one of Europe's last wild and pristine areas...

These paths are arguably the lesser of two evils. However, the root of the problem in the Northern Cairngorms is the ease of access from the ski area. The solution is to close the ski road to the public so that walkers and climbers have to walk from Glenmore; the extra hour of effort would deter most, relieving pressure on the plateau and, of course, having the added benefit of thinning out the queues in Sneachda. There was a big chance to improve matters by extending the funicular to Glenmore, allowing the Cas carpark to be removed. Unfortunately I doubt it will happen now.
skarabrae - on 28 Dec 2012
In reply to Ron Walker: they're not huts, friend of mine (a wee elf)works at the north pole, he was telling me that Santa hit a bit of turbulence over the gorms & a couple of his sacks fell off & the contents came out.
Michael Gordon - on 28 Dec 2012
In reply to Robert Durran:
> (In reply to Ron Walker)
> [...]
>
> The solution is to close the ski road to the public so that walkers and climbers have to walk from Glenmore; the extra hour of effort would deter most, relieving pressure on the plateau and, of course, having the added benefit of thinning out the queues in Sneachda. There was a big chance to improve matters by extending the funicular to Glenmore, allowing the Cas carpark to be removed. Unfortunately I doubt it will happen now.

Thank god that didn't happen!
Dave Cumberland - on 31 Dec 2012
In reply to Ron Walker:

God help the Cairngorms if they start building paths like they are in the Lake District. The NPA is out of control and the paths are ruining the area and changing the character more than any amount of erosion would.

Machine-made zigzags and stone staircases for viewing on Google Earth are impossibly out of touch with good upland management.
LakesWinter on 31 Dec 2012
In reply to Dave Cumberland: agreed!
Daniel Sutherland on 31 Dec 2012
In reply to Dave Cumberland:
> (In reply to Ron Walker)
>
> Machine-made zigzags and stone staircases for viewing on Google Earth are impossibly out of touch with good upland management.

I could think of many paths on mountains created by wandering feet equally if not more ugly than a man made track that is visible on google earth!
highclimber - on 31 Dec 2012
In reply to Ron Walker: I heard from a ski instructor last year that there was going to be another ski area developed in the area. Not sure how true it is.
davy_boy - on 31 Dec 2012
In reply to highclimber: I would doubt that very much the loch avon basin is quite a remote wild place to be turned into a ski area. would also have to cross the plateau area with some of the wildest weather in britain to even reach it. Did this instructor tell u this around the start of April by any chance?.
Cuthbert on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to highclimber:
> (In reply to Ron Walker) I heard from a ski instructor last year that there was going to be another ski area developed in the area. Not sure how true it is.

Total and utter bollocks. Sleep easy in your bed, it wont happen.
Erik B - on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to Saor Alba:did they mean area as in N gorms or area as in highland region?!
shaun stephens - on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to Ron Walker:
> (In reply to k.shark)
>
> Not so much the paths but the fact that it encourages the less experienced and the resultant erosion and litter in what is one of Europe's last wild and pristine areas... A lot more erosion has been caused by the new Ben MacDui paths recently as it it encourages the casual tourists and now mountain bikers to go further into the Cairngorms than before...

heaven forgive that we should encourage others to use the wide open spaces !!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Cuthbert on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to Erik B:

Anywhere, there are no serious proposals to expand skiing. Simply keeping the infrastructure in a usable state and paying the staff is top of the agenda.
Cuthbert on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to shaun stephens:

I know. I am all for encouraging people to visit the hills and learn about them. I'd concentrate on this by giving every school pupil in Scotland the opportunity to do an Outward Bound course and encourage a view that the land is theirs.
DafMorris - on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to Ron Walker: I've biked all over the cairngorms, new paths won't make any difference. Most bikers are really lazy. I really wouldn't consider the area too much of wilderness either, it has been managed by humans for many a year. The paths into the gorms from all sides help local businesses etc.
Douglas Griffin - on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to DafMorris:

> I really wouldn't consider the area too much of wilderness either, it has been managed by humans for many a year

Bits of the Cairngorms have been managed by humans. I certainly don't think that's true of all of it - there are large areas that are simply too high or too remote to be managed and the landscape must look pretty much the way it has since the end of the last ice age.
hwackerhage - on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to Ron Walker:
Very bad. Fine to have a car park and the skiing area near the Northern Corries but the Loch Avon basin is an almost mythical place for Scottish climbers. It should be left as natural as possible and if paths need to be fixed then please without huts etc. Thanks Ron for pointing this out...
Jamie B - on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to hwackerhage:

The path down from Loch Etchacan is quite badly eroded, so maybe some remedial work is justified. I agree about the special quality of the area, but I guess it is that same remoteness that makes temporary storage/accommodation a practical necessity for path-builders!

Happy New Year, well done on getting some routes in today. Hopefully not the last for a while but it doesn't look good!
Erik B - on 02 Jan 2013
In reply to Ron Walker: its not bloody remote or wilderness!
Rock Badger on 05 Jan 2013
In reply to Erik B: i agree not wilderness, their is no 'wilderness' in the uk

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