/ Getting rid of mould on walls with natural products

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
clochette - on 01 Jan 2013
I am wondering if anyone knows how to clean mould off walls and tiles without using caustic toxic products? I just cleaned the bathroom, which gets black mould because of condensation, and the product has made me cough and splutter as well as bleaching a part of my clothing that had contact with it by mistake. This can't be good for me or indeed for the environment.
I know it's important to try to keep things dry and ventilated, but in this room the mould still forms in winter.
Has anyone found any natural products that work?
Ben Sharp - on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to clochette: My bathroom is the coldest room in the house and always gets black mold. The best solution I've had is prevention, wipe the walls with a dry cloth once a week and dry the tiles after every shower.

If it gets too bad and you want a natural cleaner then white vinegar or baking soda solution.
clochette - on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to Ben Sharp: Thanks I'll give those products a go.
trueuk1 - on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to clochette: steam cleaner might work
michaelc - on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to clochette:
I know you'd like something more gentle, but regular household bleach in dilute solution is probably your best bet. It' not so unhealthy, you can use it to purify water for drinking after all (the dose makes the poison). You want to kill the mould, so anything you use will be at least a bit hostile to life if it's going to work!

After that, pay attention to prevention: remove water whenever required with squeegee and lots of ventilation!
ceri - on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to clochette: We use bleach, but just put on with a cloth so not spraying about so much. Our bathroom and kitchen both get mouldy.
gethin_allen on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to clochette:
As above, cheap basics bleach (without the extra crap they put in it to make random new products to flog to those with too much cash) is your friend and when futures in the sewerage system isn't too problematic as it gets broken down quite readily.
Insulation and ventilation is the real answer to the problem.
ads.ukclimbing.com
nniff - on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to clochette:

Keep a squeegee in the shower and squeegee the walls and door after use. For any bits of mould that do form, soak some loo roll or kitchen paper in bleach and stick them on the affected area for a while. It's environmentally friendly in that you have little to do with the process and the bleach only goes where it's needed.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.