/ stone carrying

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Rock Badger on 07 Jan 2013
Once went hill walking with friend who's family's tradition is to each carry a small stone/rock to put on the cairn at the top,, Do many people do this??????
bouldery bits - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to count:

I usually choose a fairly noticeable rock / sheep skull and put it in my partners bag to be carried.
Wiley Coyote - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to count:

Too many. Which helps to explain why there are too many cairns and they are too big
Rock Badger on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Wiley Coyote: would you mind if they were on the top only?
highclimber - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to count: you should do this in reverse - take a stone from the many cairns along the way and dump it somewhere innocuous that wont attract others to place one in the same place.
Rock Badger on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to highclimber: their are alot of random cairns in random places, how do you feel about cairns on the very top
BMrider - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to bouldery bits:
This is a popular jape amongst geologist groups, 2-3 kg being limit one can get away with, without being rumbled.
Tip: check your own rucksack after lunch....
Wainers44 - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to count: because of people like them I was always made to take one stone off the summit cairn and carry it back down to the carpark....
Caralynh - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Wainers44:

When we starred taking my godson to the mountains aged 6, we told him that cairns were piles of stones he could take as a souvenir. Thus depleting every cairn en route, and getting him used to heavy loads. I am a bad godmother LOL! (he's 12 now and has stopped believing me)
Neil Pratt - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to count:

Yup - I take a small stone from the summit cairn of each hill I visit and add it to my collection in the garden at home.
happy_c - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to count: I tend to carry house bricks and breeze blocks to the top, i find they make a brilliant foundation allowing the cairs to get even bigger!
Rock Badger on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to count: lol,, liking the idea of taking one for the garden
Wainers44 - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Caralynh:
> (In reply to Wainers44)
>
> When we starred taking my godson to the mountains aged 6, we told him that cairns were piles of stones he could take as a souvenir. Thus depleting every cairn en route, and getting him used to heavy loads. I am a bad godmother LOL! (he's 12 now and has stopped believing me)

Kids are great, just so gullable. For years ours believed the old haggis...small furry animal...legs on one side shorter than the other so they can run around the hill on the level stories. One even had an argument with his teacher when she suggested it was a wind up.



...it is just a wind up, right??...
highclimber - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to count:
> (In reply to highclimber) their are alot of random cairns in random places, how do you feel about cairns on the very top

it doesn't matter if they are on the summit or on the path along the way, they should be discouraged.
Caralynh - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Wainers44:

Of course its not a wind up. I hear they graze from the spaghetti trees....
Rock Badger on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to highclimber: why should they be discouraged
IainRUK - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to highclimber:
> (In reply to count)
> [...]
>
> it doesn't matter if they are on the summit or on the path along the way, they should be discouraged.

Why? Look at a summit like Foel Goch? Foel Gron? A few more stones is hardly an issue...

What is an issue is the huge amount of erosion climbing foel goch..
highclimber - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to IainRUK:

"Cairns and memorials
The BMC does not support the use of waymarks,
cairns or other intrusive features, other than those
traditionally established on summits and path
junctions.
Some cairns are important landmarks but most are an
unnecessary intrusion and detract from the character
of a wild and remote setting. Building cairns
exacerbates erosion and is the mountain equivalent
of graffiti, so donít do it"

http://www.theuiaa.org/upload_area/files/1/Green-guide_UK_Uplands-BMC.pdf

awwritetroops on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to count:

some ay ma mates carry a wee rock and get a wee stone at the cairn, naw.
mr mills - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to IainRUK:

What is unacceptable is the cairns between Glyder Fach and Glyder Fawr, stones have been taken from the surrounding area and piled every 5mtrs or so, there is no purpose for this all it`s done is to create erosion especially on this scale !
ads.ukclimbing.com
IainRUK - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to highclimber:
> (In reply to IainRUK)
>
> "Cairns and memorials
> The BMC does not support the use of waymarks,
> cairns or other intrusive features, other than those
> traditionally established on summits and path
> junctions.
> Some cairns are important landmarks but most are an
> unnecessary intrusion and detract from the character
> of a wild and remote setting. Building cairns
> exacerbates erosion and is the mountain equivalent
> of graffiti, so donít do it"
>
> http://www.theuiaa.org/upload_area/files/1/Green-guide_UK_Uplands-BMC.pdf

Really? Did the BMC state that about the Ben Cairns? I don't know.. it would be good to know they have such a consistent stance.. tbh I'm not sure such a broad brush approach is good..

Mills.. agree.. but do think proper cairns should have been built for that reason... as they would get built there regardless..
Wainers44 - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to mr mills:
> (In reply to IainRUK)
>
> What is unacceptable is the cairns between Glyder Fach and Glyder Fawr, stones have been taken from the surrounding area and piled every 5mtrs or so, there is no purpose for this all it`s done is to create erosion especially on this scale !

But worse (better?) by far is the line of cairns off the top of Cairngorm heading to the railway. They are so close together their bases almost seem to touch (thats a wall then isnt it??)
Tom V - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to highclimber:

A walk up Nine Standards Rigg would keep you busy, then.
Alternatively you could google the whereabouts of some of the piles of stone thrown up by that fellow Goldsworthy and have at them.
Rigid Raider - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to count:

Instead of cairns, why not paint arrows all the way up the mountain like the French do?

*runs for cover*
Ben Sharp - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Wainers44:
> (In reply to count) because of people like them I was always made to take one stone off the summit cairn and carry it back down to the carpark....

Priceless Sisyphean analogy of western capitalism, people carrying stones up and down hill for eternity, each one thinking they're doing something worthwhile by either (a) clearing the hill or (b) leaving a memento. I prefer to just have a sandwich and move on, both literally and as a general metaphor for life!
Wainers44 - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Ben Sharp: ah but you forget just how many carparks I have resurfaced with my efforts....
Wainers44 - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Rigid Raider:
> (In reply to count)
>
> Instead of cairns, why not paint arrows all the way up the mountain like the French do?
>
> *runs for cover*

Welsh farmers already seem to do that to make sure you dont put a footstep off paths crossing their fields!
Toby S - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Caralynh:
> (In reply to Wainers44)
>
> Of course its not a wind up. I hear they graze from the spaghetti trees....

Spaghetti Trees? In Scotland? Don't be daft, it's Black Pudding Trees that they graze from.
Milesy - on 08 Jan 2013
I remove a stone from each cairn. Occasionally though I accidently kick a full cairn down.
malky_c - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to count: I can't be bothered counting up, but the number of people saying they remove stones and those saying they add them seem about equal. That should ensure no change to the current situation.
Ramblin dave - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to highclimber:
> (In reply to IainRUK)
>
> "Cairns and memorials
> The BMC does not support the use of waymarks,
> cairns or other intrusive features, other than those
> traditionally established on summits and path
> junctions.

This is very different from "they should be discouraged everywhere", though...

Bruce Hooker - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to highclimber:

> The BMC does not support the use of waymarks, cairns

Another good reason to have nothing to do with the BMC!

Cairns have been used since neolithic times, and probably before, and still will be when the BMC is not even a distant memory.
Ramblin dave - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Bruce Hooker:
> (In reply to highclimber)
>
> [...]
>
> Another good reason to have nothing to do with the BMC!

Bear in mind that highclimber's comment bears no relation to what the BMC actually, say though.

AFAICT what they're against is arbitrarily building new cairns left right and centre to compensate for people being unable to read a map or follow a path. They've got no problem with "traditional" summit cairns and markers...
Ridge - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Rigid Raider:
> (In reply to count)
>
> Instead of cairns, why not paint arrows all the way up the mountain like the French do?

It's much more fun to have a selection of stones handy to kick at passing cyclists ;-)
Rock Badger on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to count: Summit cairns and cairns to mark path junctions seem all good to me, its the pointless confusing ones that need kicked over. My mate an i were contemplating knocking a few down one time but i felt a bit shady at the thought of being caught, must be quite satisfying though
Rock Badger on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to count: I also like when people have built wee shelter type bogins to hide from the winds often found on the tops, great for a wee brew and rest on the top ish out the wind.
Tom Last - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to count:

I pick up a rock and give it to my girlfriend, then once she's accepted it I say "oh but it'll miss all of its friends, have these ones too", and in accepting them, they too will miss their friends and so it continues exponentially until a good part of her rucksac is full of pebbles. Great fun.
She's 33 by the way and so am I ;)
Tom V - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Southern Man:
Perhaps not as quirky as you think. There was a brilliant cartoon in a climbing mag years ago where a dastardly hold chipper got his come uppance from two slivers of rock which had been bonded together lovingly for the past few thousand millennia. When he struck the rock, one sliver said goodbye to his erstwhile lover and flew straight into the vandal's eyeball.
highclimber - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Ramblin dave:
> (In reply to highclimber)
> [...]
>
> This is very different from "they should be discouraged everywhere", though...

Not really, we shouldn't be encouraging people to add to any cairn in my opinion. I am not talking about the systematic removal of all cairns as some do have significance
Just because there's a summit does not warrant a cairn nor does every path confluence require a cairn. Learn to read a map and leave the stones where they are!
IainRUK - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to highclimber: I think certain areas.. cairns are better than paths..

But some summit marker is OK..

Where I am opposed is on crib goch.. those which signify the lower path.. or there are also some on the miners which lead you off route...
Dave Perry - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to count:

What's the point of summit cairns anyway?
highclimber - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to IainRUK:
> (In reply to highclimber) I think certain areas.. cairns are better than paths..
>

Paths are put in place to help prevent erosion - cairns exacerbate it. In an ideal world there should be neither but unfortunately this isn't so.
johncook - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Dave Perry: So you can get just lttle bit higher?
IainRUK - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to highclimber: well in certain areas.. glyders a prime example.. we can use cairns where a path would be more intrusive and constrain the impacts of people.. but as Mills pointed out.. making those cairns from surrounding rocks totally contradicts that point..


The Ben is similar..

Tom Last - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Tom V:

Haha, good one! Well there's nothing new under the Sun as they say.
In reply to count:

Mountain climbing is such fun
I think Iíll do it at a run.
Itís a pity I ever have to stop
But you canít climb past the top.
I thought Iíd commemorate the day I got up here
With a song and a pint of beer
And take a stone from down below
And put it on the top of everywhere I go.

It seemed to me such a good idea
But now thereís consequences I fear.
For every hill I climb is now thinner round the middle
The reasonís plain to see, this is no riddle.
For on the top, balanced precarious,
Are rocks and stones, origins, various.
The mountains are higher now, itís fine,
Iíve another thousand feet to climb.
Itís a long way to the summit of each cairn
They are like the mountainís little bairn.
Perhaps I should leave the stones where they are
Instead of scattering them near and far,
Because, at least it seems to me,
Thatís just where theyíre meant to be.

John Burns

Blog: Mountains, Middle age and Much, Much more
http://johndburns.wordpress.com
Al Evans on 20 Jan 2013
In reply to John Burns: Ithought of taking a small stone fron Stanage and leaving it at my high point on Everest. I forgot about in the packing, but there is a rockery in a garden in Morden,Surrey with a rock from Everest in it. For awhile there was also an Aqaurium with a rock in the from same spot, it's much easier bringing a stone down from 27,000ft than taking one up anyhow :-)
fmck - on 22 Jan 2013
In reply to count:

I used to take a rock off a Munro and collect it in my garden. After awhile I realised my Munro dry stance dyke wasn't going anywhere so went for bigger rocks.
One day hungover I struggled up a peak to put my well won rock in to find the last one still there. Lesson learned and packed that stupidity in.

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