/ Fantasy books

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Si dH - on 07 Jan 2013
Hi all,
Can anyone recommend me a fairly easy to read but good fantasy book or series? Im looking for something I can read when a bit brain-dead after work. Im open to lots of options, things Ive enjoyed in no particualr order order include Harry Potter, Game of Thrones, Tolkien books, Hunger Games, the Liveship series, various others. It needs to be something I can download for my Nook glowlight thingy but this includes most stuff.
Thanks :)
mbambi - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH: Have you tried the Assasins trilogy also by Robin Hobb, Mistborn trilogy by Brendon Sanderson, I'll try and think of some others
Bambi
Tom Last - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH:

It's gotta be The Warlock of Firetop Mountain

Either open the chest and turn to page 38, or fight the zombie maniac, turn to page 72...

Page 38. The chest sucks out your soul, and binds it in eternal slavery to the warlock. You are dead.

Page 72. The zombie maniac smashes your skull in. You are dead.

Classic stuff :)
Dax H - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH: If you enjoyed the live ships there is the assassins trilogy and the fools trilogy.
Also the rift war saga by Raymond feist.
Swirly - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH: David Gemell's Troy trilogy was pretty good IMO. It's a re-imagining of the Trojan war.
mrbird - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH: The bible.
Sebastian Fontleroy - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH:

The Troy Series by David Gammell might be worth considering. Not usually my sort of thing but i enjoyed them and may just be what you're looking for.
Sebastian Fontleroy - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Sebastian Fontleroy:

Lol swirly beat me to it
climbingpixie - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH:

Agree with the Raymond Feist recommendation. Even if you just read Magician it's worth it. What about the Trudi Canavan books? The Black Magician series and Age of the Five are pretty good, in a slightly trashy way.
IMA - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH: +X to Magician and the rest of the riftwar saga. Serpent war Saga is good too if you enjoy it.

Wizards first rule - Terry Goodkind. part of a larger series but again very good on its own

Eye of the World = Robert Jordan. Part of a 14 part epic with ups and downs. However the first book worth reading along and great

The redemption of Athalus -David and Leigh Eddings - Stand alone and fantastic

Troy series - David Gremmel

Rome series by Conn Iguldun

If you like Roman History - Robert Harris Imperium and Lustrum. The previous also pretty close to the truth according to my old Roman History lecturer - seemed it to me as well.

If you have all of those I'll go dig through some more
Jimmy1976 - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH:
Chronicles of Thomas Covanant the Unbeliever is pretty good.
or
Also David Gemmel's 'Jerusalem Man' stories. I think the first is 'wolf in shadow'
another_alex - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH:
anything by Ursula le Guin or the Pern series by Anne McCaffery
deepsoup - on 07 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH:
Have you read any Terry Pratchett?
The Discworld books are lovely, and a very easy read:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discworld

Not a series sadly, but Neil Gaiman's 'Stardust' is absolutely delightful. (All the better if you haven't seen the film.)
no_more_scotch_eggs - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to another_alex:
> (In reply to Si dH)
> anything by Ursula le Guin or the Pern series by Anne McCaffery

Seconded re le guin. The earthsea trilogy is up there with the greats of the genre.

lynda - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH: The Deverry books by Katherine Kerr are also excellent but not standalone (in some ways makes them all the more satisfying).

The first dragonlance trilogy is also very good (and epic)
katherinec85 - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH:

Another vote for the Riftwar Saga. Just finished reading the 2nd book of the trilogy, and really really enjoying it so far.
jayjackson - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH:
Recently got into Joe Abercrombie, really gritty but often quite brutal. His "The First Law" series is the best in my opinion.

China Mieville also very, very good. Perdido Street Station, The Scar and Iron Council all interlinked, but also work on their own. His other books are great too.

Another vote for The Earthsea Quartet by Ursula Le Guin - although I reckon the first book is the only "easy read". Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series is good, although as previously mentioned, it does go up and down a bit.

Last of all, Philip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy is superb (and shouldn't be judged on the terrible film adaption!).
PixieNinja - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to jayjackson:
seconded on 'His dark materials' great books and yes just ignore the shite film.

highly recommend Patrick Rothfuss' kingkiller trilogy, the first one is 'The name of the wind'

Also just read a book 'Daughter of smoke and bone' by Laini Taylor which is also an excellent read.
John W - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to no_more_scotch_eggs:
> (In reply to another_alex)
> [...]
>
> Seconded re le guin. The earthsea trilogy is up there with the greats of the genre.

Thirded! And if you like this, I recommend the Shannara series by Terry Brooks.
Paul F - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH:

There's older stuff like Anne McCaffrey's 'Dragon Riders of Pern', or James Herbert's 'Dune' series
ads.ukclimbing.com
RockSteady on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH:

My favourite fantasy series are:

The Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan

Anything by Guy Gavriel Kay but particularly Tigana, The Lions of Al Rassan and the Fionavar Tapestry

The Deverry series by Katherine Kerr

The Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson / spin-offs by Ian Cameron Esselmont

Clarence - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Southern Man:
> (In reply to Si dH)
>
> It's gotta be The Warlock of Firetop Mountain

Jeez! It's still in print as well, guess my Christmas book tokens are going to be used the same way they were in 1983...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Warlock-Firetop-Mountain-Fighting-Fantasy/dp/1848310757/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&a...
climbingpixie - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to RockSteady:

I'm so excited, the final wheel of time book is out today! I know what I'll be doing for the next few evenings!
SAF - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH: I haven't read through the whole thread so apologise if these have already been suggested

His dark materials triology -Pullman

Neverwhere, startdust and Anazi Boys by Neil Gaiman
Tom Last - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Clarence:

Yeah, they must have done alright out of it over the years. They were good fun, for their day :)
willworkforfoodjnr - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH: Another plus for The First Law stuff by Jow Abercombie. Only read the first one, but really enjoying it
Mr Lopez - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH:

Some recommendations on the "fairly easy to read but good fantasy book or series" criteria.

If you liked the Liveship Traders then you have to read the Farseer Trilogy and its follow up The Tawny Man Trilogy.

The Locke Lamora series (Lynch) are also very entertaining and easy reading, and the final instalment will be out soon.

Another vote for Rothfuss' Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles), but the second book is a disappointment and the last one will be a while to be released.

In a similar vein as the last is Peter V Brett's Painted Man trilogy.

Not so easy to read series but excellent that have been mentioned before are Abercrombie's First Law Trilogy, and The Heroes(Best Served Cold wasn't that good). Also the Malazan Books, but that is a pretty tough read, specially the first book which is usually the stopper book for most.

Same style as Abercrombie but one step better is Richard Morgan's A Land Fit For Heroes series. Incidentally he is a climber and has some amusing climbing scenes in his books.

I would stay well away from Raymond Feist, Trudi Canavan, Terry Goodkind, and Terry Brooks, as well as Tad Williams (hasn't been mentioned yet but is bound to). I found their books simplistic rather than 'easy reading' and their writing style akin to a 10 year old's 'what i did in my holiday' school essay. ;-)
goosebump - on 08 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH: ]
Douglas Adams - the long dark tea time of the soul and Dirk Gentlys Holistic Detective Agency (nothing like the terrible tv series)
Si dH - on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH:
Thanks all! In answer to someone, yes I have read a lot of Discworld, I enjoy them although not as much as some other stuff sometimes.
A few people recommended His Dark Materials; I did read the first of these but it didnt take me enough to then be bothered reading the others - I may have been in the wrong frame of mind at the time though...

Lots of options here anyway! :)
teh_mark - on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH:

David Gemmell's Drenai series.
Martin Wing - on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to Si dH: In reply to Si dH: Iv really got into Tim Powers recently. So far iv enjoyed.
Anubis Gates
On Stranger Tides
Drawing Of The Dark
The Stress Of Her Regard

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