/ after a colon or semi colon...

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andic - on 09 Jan 2013
CAPITAL letter or lower case?
In reply to andic: lower
parkovski - on 09 Jan 2013
In reply to andic:

Always lower for semicolons, but depends on the situation for colons (i.e, capitalization may be better when a colon precedes a list of full sentences).
andic - on 09 Jan 2013
In reply: Cheers, ive only got a semi so should be fine
Blue Straggler - on 09 Jan 2013
In reply to andic:
> In reply: Cheers, ive only got a semi so should be fine

Been listening to the sexed-up Archers or something?
Coel Hellier - on 09 Jan 2013
In reply to andic:

After a semi-colon always lower case. After a colon, American style is to use a capital, British style to use lower case (however on some occasions a Brit may decide that a capital is better).
Rollo - on 09 Jan 2013
In reply to andic:
> In reply: Cheers, ive only got a semi so should be fine

I call BULLSHIT !

You set this whole thread up for that punchline

andic - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to Rollo:

Not a bit of it!! How dare you Sir?

However in multi-component systems such as HEAs any intermetallics formed will certainly have a degree of complexity and substitution; the actual difference in entropy between a solid solution and the possible intermetallic structures may be lower than expected thus the favourability of a solid solution could be reduced.
tony on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to andic:
> (In reply to Rollo)
>
> Not a bit of it!! How dare you Sir?
>
> However in multi-component systems such as HEAs any intermetallics formed will certainly have a degree of complexity and substitution; the actual difference in entropy between a solid solution and the possible intermetallic structures may be lower than expected thus the favourability of a solid solution could be reduced.

Always lower case. But what does the favourability of a solid solution could be reduced. mean?
andic - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to tony:

in terms of energy,

It does need a bit of work though,perhaps: the relative stability of a SS?
tony on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to andic:

I'd go for something like:
However in multi-component systems such as HEAs, any intermetallics formed will have a degree of complexity and substitution so the actual difference in entropy between a solid solution and the possible intermetallic structures may be lower than expected. This may have adverse effects on the relative stability of a solid solution.

or the last bit could be
This may reduce the relative stability of a solid solution.
Dave Garnett - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to andic:

I thought the answer was going be a stoma and a bag...
Milesy - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to tony:

I would still use a semi colon instead of full stop before "This" as the last sentence is logically part of the rest.
tony on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to Milesy:
> (In reply to tony)
>
> I would still use a semi colon instead of full stop before "This" as the last sentence is logically part of the rest.

It's largely a matter of choice. I very rarely use colons or semi-colons, because I don't think they make text any easier to read. They usually result in sentences getting more convoluted than they need to be, and I tend to prefer the greater clarity of full stops and tidy sentences.
In reply to tony:
> (In reply to Milesy)
> [...]
>
> It's largely a matter of choice. I very rarely use colons or semi-colons, because I don't think they make text any easier to read. They usually result in sentences getting more convoluted than they need to be, and I tend to prefer the greater clarity of full stops and tidy sentences.

It just depends on whether you wish to tie two subjects together or keep them separate. Neither of which can be accommodated by not using colon/semi-colon.
tony on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to grumpybearpantsclimbinggoat:

I disagree. In the case I edited above, the semi-colon is removed and the association is clear.
Ander on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to andic:
Better still. Don't use the semi colon. It's not really needed. Just use a full stop instead.
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Coel Hellier - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to andic:

However in multi-component systems such as HEAs any intermetallics formed will be complex and affected by substitution. The difference in entropy between a solid solution and the possible intermetallic structures may be lower than expected, reducing the favourability of a solid solution.

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