/ Your favourite war?

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Cú Chullain - on 25 Jan 2013
This is a toughie. Both World Wars would usually trump this considering the staggering amounts of lives lost, both military and civilian, the number of atrocities and systematic murders of entire populations. The USSR losing close to 14 % of its population in WW II is quite an extraordinary achievement. The Vietnam war had napalm, agent orange, a million dead people (approx.) and cool music.

I have a soft spot for the Bosnian War, though. Brutal, sinister, murderous. Totally powerless UN troops. Snipers. Starving civilians. Medieval type savagery commited by both sides. Nobody really knew who the good guys were and no one knows who actually won it. It had it all really, and not very far away from us. It wins my vote.

Special mention to the Punic Wars, my second choice.

graeme jackson - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:
> Your favourite war?

Evelyn
dale1968 - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to graeme jackson:
> (In reply to Cú Chullain)
>
> Evelyn
very droll
anyway Cannae as a battle gets my vote along with Towton
graeme jackson - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:
I have to say, all joking aside, that the concept of a favourite war is as offensive to me as a favourite rapist, mass murder or peadophile.
Pursued by a bear - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain: Of the worlds.

T.
What are the chances of that?
Mike Stretford - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to graeme jackson: This isn't just a troll, 'out there' Cú is showing us his disdain for political correctness and his above average historical knowledge.
dale1968 - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to graeme jackson: get over yourself; its History, I would not label them as my most favourite, but memorable for the sheer waste, I am sure they would be happy to know that there still being discussed, dead but not forgotten
Owen W-G - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to dale1968:

Soft spot for Battle of Kabesh, Egyptians vs Hitties, biggest Chariot battle ever, 5k-6k of the blighters, ended a draw, lots of carnage
Blue Straggler - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

American Civil War drove great advances in medicine and other technologies. And it had my favourite soundtrack
Mr_Yeti - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

... of the roses.

Ended up in a nice flower so swings and roundabouts.
kingjam - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

War of the roses closely followed by bride wars
Trangia - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

In terms of a righteous cause (from Britain's POV)

The Great War*
The Second World War
The Falklands War*

*Bruce need not respond
Sir Chasm - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain: The War of Jenkins' Ear, purely for the name.
cb294 - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

La Guerra de Futbol, also known as 100 hours war. Fortunately rather short, and most spectacularly pointless, probably illustrating a general point....

CB
Steve John B - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain: Korean War. Without it there would be no Gangnam style.
Bimble on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to graeme jackson:
> (In reply to Cú Chullain)
> I have to say, all joking aside, that the concept of a favourite war is as offensive to me as a favourite rapist, mass murder or peadophile.

+1
dale1968 - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain: Forgot, Brunanburgh and its got some nice A S poetry
Robert Durran - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

the Trojan one because it is the font of so much literature and culture.
Trangia - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

The other one, of course, was the Battle of Hastings

It totally changed Britain's culture and future.
Clarence - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

The War of Jenkin's Ear just for the name.
Caesar's Gallic War because it was the first book I did in Latin class.
Alexander's Indian campaign, gotta love a good pike vs elephant showdown.
ads.ukclimbing.com
ThunderCat - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to graeme jackson:
> (In reply to Cú Chullain)
> I have to say, all joking aside, that the concept of a favourite war is as offensive to me as a favourite rapist, mass murder or peadophile.

I started a "Who's your favourite paedophile" thread last week (I spelled it right too) and it got pulled.

It's political correctness gone mad, I tells ya


Clarence - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Clarence:
Sir Chasm, not fair - you got in with Jennie's Lughole while I was trying to choose my other two!
LaMentalist on 25 Jan 2013
The Lemming - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to graeme jackson:
> (In reply to Cú Chullain)
> I have to say, all joking aside, that the concept of a favourite war is as offensive to me as a favourite rapist, mass murder or peadophile.

The Boar War taught us a thing or two and gave us a heads up for the war to end all wars.

As for my favourite mass murderer, obviously this has to be a civilian with no political power behind them otherwise they would be cheating by using the military to help them out, would have to be Dr Shipman. We really have no idea how many he bumped off.

And my fav Peado has to be Jim Savil. Now then, now then.
Trangia - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to ThunderCat:
> (In reply to graeme jackson)
> [...]
>
> I started a "Who's your favourite paedophile" thread last week (I spelled it right too) and it got pulled.
>
> It's political correctness gone mad, I tells ya

Nah! Unlike paedophilia, wars are wholesome, clean, manly pastimes which provide endless pleasure to armchair warriors who haven't actually experienced them.
dale1968 - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Trangia: cannot remember the last book I read about a paedo, but quite a few about wars...
Trangia - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to The Lemming:
> (In reply to graeme jackson)
> [...]
>
> The Boar War taught us a thing or two and gave us a heads up for the war to end all wars.
>
>

I thought it taught us to keep our heads down when confronting mere farmers who happened to able to shoot a lot straighter than the average British swaddie of the time?
The Lemming - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Trangia:
> (In reply to The Lemming)
> [...]
>
> I thought it taught us to keep our heads down when confronting mere farmers who happened to able to shoot a lot straighter than the average British swaddie of the time?

See, we learnt stuff. :-)

Came in handy in the trenches and digging under them.
The Lemming - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to The Lemming:

And what have the Americans learnt about war?

Clarence - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Trangia:

> Nah! Unlike paedophilia, wars are wholesome, clean, manly pastimes which provide endless pleasure to armchair warriors who haven't actually experienced them.

I've been caught up in a few skirmishes as a civilian (Ethiopia, Georgia, Nepal, Israel) and it is pretty crappy but it doesn't make it any the less interesting.
Ridge - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to The Lemming:
> (In reply to graeme jackson)
> [...]
>
> The Boar War taught us a thing or two

1. Watch out for the tusks
2. Tasty sausages
ThunderCat - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to The Lemming:
> (In reply to graeme jackson)
> [...]
>

> As for my favourite mass murderer, obviously this has to be a civilian with no political power behind them otherwise they would be cheating by using the military to help them out, would have to be Dr Shipman. We really have no idea how many he bumped off.
>

Shipman definately raised the bar by an massive amount.
redsonja - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain: sick question
Clarence - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to ThunderCat:

> Shipman definately raised the bar by an massive amount.

http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j138/GodSaveIdiAmin/VizWestShipman.jpg
Shani - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to graeme jackson:
> (In reply to Cú Chullain)
> [...]
>
> Evelyn


Man O'
graeme jackson - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to ThunderCat:
> (In reply to graeme jackson)
> [...]
>
> I started a "Who's your favourite paedophile" thread last week (I spelled it right too) and it got pulled.
>

Bugger . at least you didn't mention my lack of 'er' on 'murder'.
John Rushby - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

The Spanish Civil War was a belter for literature, art and poetry.
Robert Durran - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to John Rushby:
> (In reply to Cú Chullain)
>
> The Spanish Civil War was a belter for literature, art and poetry.

Nowhere near as good as the Trojan war though!

Welsh Kate - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:
I'm a military historian and don't have a 'favourite' war as such, but some of the most interesting to me are those fought in north Africa in the late Republic / early Empire - against Jugurtha, Caesar's civil war campaigns there, and the war against Tacfarinas.

I guess I probably have a soft spot for Caesar's Gallic War too, if only because Book 1 was one of my O level texts.
Cú Chullain - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Welsh Kate:
> (In reply to Cú Chullain)
> I'm a military historian and don't have a 'favourite' war as such, but some of the most interesting to me are those fought in north Africa in the late Republic / early Empire - against Jugurtha, Caesar's civil war campaigns there, and the war against Tacfarinas.

Very interesting period, although being flippant in my OP I love the history of the rise of early Roman Empire and the Punic Wars.

In fairness, whats not to love about the Punic wars, spanned over 100 years, hundreds of tasty smaller engagements across two continents on land and sea, 100,000s of lives lost, Cathage's naval advantage vs Romes powerful legions, it came in three nice installments with time for rebuilding and rearming inbetween and conquest inbetween, charasmatic and often brilliant leaders, elephants, a final decisive victory that gave birth to one of the greatest empires in antiquity. Scipio Africanus is really interesting chap as well.


Jimbo W on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to TryfAndy:

> > (In reply to Cú Chullain)
> > I have to say, all joking aside, that the concept of a favourite war is as offensive to me as a favourite rapist, mass murder or peadophile.

> +1

+2
Trangia - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to graeme jackson:
> (In reply to Cú Chullain)
> I have to say, all joking aside, that the concept of a favourite war is as offensive to me as a favourite rapist, mass murder or peadophile.

Whilst I understand where you are coming from I think you are wrong.

"Favourite" doesn't have to denote approval of a subject and is defined (amongst other things) as "a person or thing regarded with especial preference"

I would suggest that it's a perfectly proper concept for a military historian to have a "favourite war".
Enty - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Trangia:

Correct.

E
Mike Highbury - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Robert Durran:
> (In reply to John Rushby)
> [...]
>
> Nowhere near as good as the Trojan war though!

Of the Six Day War for rightful victors
dek - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:
The brutal 'Glasgow Ice Cream War'..total meltdown, open wafer on the streets. The losers tasted a severe licking. Reported to be 99 casualties, on bloody Sundae.
dale1968 - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to dek: very good....
Tom Last - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

No votes for the English Civil War yet?
I'll go with that - great hats.
KellyKettle - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain: Probably the Soviet-Afghan War... I've read extensively on it, and it's really fascinating to see how the tactics continued to evolve as both the Russians and the Mujahedin managed to outsmart each other or acquired new technologies.

It also served as a poor omen for the 2001 intervention which we're currently trying to back away from quietly... In general, we've come off a lot better than the Russians, largely thanks to a less repressive approach to the whole distasteful taking over someone else's country thing.
Welsh Kate - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:
The Punic Wars are interesting, I'll concede, but they've been so studied, it's more fun to look at something a bit more off-beat. And you do get elephants in other campaigns too...
toad - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:War, huh? What's it Good for?
In reply to Cú Chullain:
> The USSR losing close to 14 % of its population in WW II is quite an extraordinary achievement.

With an unintended outcome that Russia is now full of stunning women...
confusicating on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Trangia:

You know, (you may) the battle of Hastings wasn't actually in Hastings. It was in Battle. A place near Hastings.

I'm not so sure it was called battle back then.
dale1968 - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to confusicating: Senlac Hill, although I believe there's doubt about that!
dale1968 - on 25 Jan 2013
the power - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain: cod war
Trangia - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to confusicating:
> (In reply to Trangia)
>
> You know, (you may) the battle of Hastings wasn't actually in Hastings. It was in Battle. A place near Hastings.
>
> I'm not so sure it was called battle back then.

I do know, because I live here in Hastings!!

And Dale 1968 is correct. There is now doubt that the battle took place at Senlac Hill in Battle at all, and there is a strong theory that it was near Crowhurst about 3 miles away.

The big mystery about the Battle town site is that, although an estmated 10,000 soldiers from both sides were killed, no bones or weapons have ever been found on the supposed battle field or near it, yet William built the Abbey "on the site" of his victory. He's hardly likely to got that wrong was he?

It remains a mystery.
confusicating on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Trangia:

No way! That's where my g/f is from! Maybe you are palz!
MonkeyPuzzle - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

The Great Baked Beans War of 1996. Aldi romping home the victors.
Trangia - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to confusicating:

I might know her. Does/did she belong to Hastings Rock & Fell Club which climbs every Monday evening at the Grove school?

My climbing partner lives in Battle.
confusicating on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Trangia:

Nope, never heard of it. Ah well!
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Kipper - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Trangia:
> (In reply to The Lemming)
> [...]
>
> I thought it taught us to keep our heads down when confronting mere farmers who happened to able to shoot a lot straighter than the average British swaddie of the time?

Probably why it's called the Boer (farmer) not Boar (sausage) War.



David Martin - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

Vietnam, for the soundtrack, women, hippies, and seeing the yanks get shafted.
ice.solo - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to the power:
> (In reply to Cú Chullain) cod war

another vote for the Cod War. if only all wars could have a sense of humour.

second place goes to the tajik civil war. dont feel alone if you never heard of it.
Skyfall - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

I'm more interested in the naval side of things than any specific war. On that front the Napoleonic is hard to beat of course, but WWII is fascinating. I suppose those were the culmination of fighting techniques in the ships of the time against a world changing backdrop.

Of course, being in my late teens at the time, the Falklands is the one I 'exeprienced'. Having heard my parents talk about WWII, I suppose it let me know what it's really like to wake up and hear the casualty count/ships sunk etc.
Wanderer100 - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Skyfall: From a historical point of view my favourite wars are the peninsular wars during which Wellington whupped Napoleons Marshals on more than a few occasions. Although Napoleon and Wellington never met on the Battlefield until Waterloo.
Tiberius - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

The mongol's campaign in central Europe led by Subutai
Jim C - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain: the Falklands, I watched it on TV like a computer game, and remember thinking that Thatcher had actually done something I thought was right.(at the time at least)

A little older and wiser, and with release of more information, I am borderline that she should be up on war crimes charges , as should Tony Blair for different reasons.
Flatus Vetus - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

Ragnarok is one of my faves...
MJ - on 25 Jan 2013
In reply to Jim C:

I am borderline that she should be up on war crimes charges

What for exactly?
bouldery bits - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:

The Cod War!

Gudrun - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to Cú Chullain:
> I have a soft spot for the Bosnian War, though. Brutal, sinister, murderous. Totally powerless UN troops. Snipers. Starving civilians. Medieval type savagery commited by both sides. Nobody really knew who the good guys were and no one knows who actually won it.

Oh the good guys were the Yugoslav army and Communist Party of Yugoslavia who wanted to avoid war and the bad guys were Nato,Genser,Ustash,Tudman, Izetbegovic and Islamist fundamentalists.
Trangia - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to MJ:
> (In reply to Jim C)
>
> I am borderline that she should be up on war crimes charges
>
> What for exactly?

+1
Ridge - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to GudrunEnsslin:
> (In reply to Cú Chullain)
> [...]
>
> Oh the good guys were the Yugoslav army and Communist Party of Yugoslavia who wanted to avoid war and the bad guys were Nato,Genser,Ustash,Tudman, Izetbegovic and Islamist fundamentalists.

Aye, good old JNA and the VRS, never hurt anybody..

My personal recollection was it was raping, murdering babykillers vs babykilling raping murderers vs murdering, babykilling rapists.
dissonance - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to Flatus Vetus:
> (In reply to Cú Chullain)
>
> Ragnarok is one of my faves...

isnt that a prophecy of a future war?

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