/ Gaelic pronunciation help

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fimm on 26 Jan 2013
How would one say "Aonach Sgoilte"? (Its one of the ridges of Ladhar Bheinn in Knoydart, and means "split ridge" apparently.)

'A-on-ach' I think, but 'Sgoilte'?
Douglas Griffin - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to fimm:

The sounds are quite hard to write phonetically in English.

The "ao" in Aonach is like a dipthong, i.e. the a and o are pronounced together. My best effort to write this phonetically would be "oonach", but it's not a broad "oo", more like a cross between that and the German "ue", (as in ueber).

Sgoilte should be something like "skoil-tchye".

Saor Alba's your man to confirm though.
pog100 - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to fimm:
no idea but a lovely way up after you get the initial slog out of the way...
Wiley Coyote - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to fimm:
The basic rule from what I can make out is to pronounce all the consonants that aren't there and none of the ones that are!
Douglas Griffin - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to fimm:

You can hear the "aon" sound here (aon is Gaelic for "one", or "a" (the indefinite article); click on the word in bold): http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/foghlam/beag_air_bheag/units/unit_08/
digby - on 27 Jan 2013
In reply to fimm:

Sorley MacLean pronouncing Aonach (Eagach) from the Munro Show http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aE4Z3_Q0N0
nickyrannoch on 27 Jan 2013
In reply to Douglas Griffin:
> (In reply to fimm)
>
> The sounds are quite hard to write phonetically in English.
>
> The "ao" in Aonach is like a dipthong, i.e. the a and o are pronounced together. My best effort to write this phonetically would be "oonach", but it's not a broad "oo", more like a cross between that and the German "ue", (as in ueber).
>
> Sgoilte should be something like "skoil-tchye".
>
> Saor Alba's your man to confirm though.

this is bang on.

fimm on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to Douglas Griffin:

Thank you very much.
I'll follow up the link to Aonach, which I thought I knew how to say...

"skoil-tchye" - the "ch" in the second syllable must be as in loch, not as in church?
Douglas Griffin - on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to fimm:

You're welcome!

The "ch" in the second syllable as in church. :-)
Cuthbert on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to fimm:

Please put a soundfile request in here and I will record one for you.

http://www.cnag.org/en/mountain-names
fimm on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to Saor Alba:

Done.
I'd not come across that service before - but I have not been on UKC/UKH very much recently.
Thank you to all
Tom Last - on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to Saor Alba:
> (In reply to fimm)
>
> Please put a soundfile request in here and I will record one for you.
>
> http://www.cnag.org/en/mountain-names

Wow, great resource.
Cuthbert on 29 Jan 2013
In reply to fimm:

http://www.cnag.org/en/mountain-names

I've put up a few sounds files this morning including the one you requested.
fimm on 31 Jan 2013
In reply to Saor Alba:

Thank you very much.
Gordon Stainforth - on 31 Jan 2013
In reply to Saor Alba:

What a brilliant service you are providing.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Pero - on 31 Jan 2013
In reply to Douglas Griffin: I always thought a diphthong was where two vowel sounds merged into each other: as in "oil", but not as in "bear", where there is only one vowel sound.

Scots and Yorkshire pronunciation has few diphthongs. Both tend to use pure vowel sounds (Yorkshire being even purer than Scots, I hate to admit) - also called monophthongs. Although few vowel sounds are totally pure.

Received English pronunciation and, say, London dialect are full of diphthongs. E.g. "oh no" in a mock upper class accent would have very distinct multiple vowel sounds, perhaps even more than 2! Or, in London, "south" can sound more like "sa-iff".

German has generally pure vowel sounds, not diphthongs. "Ueber" in particular is a monophthong. It's a pure sound. Unlike "neu", which sounds like "boy" and is a diphthong.

But, I notice from looking round t'Internet, that opinions tend to be divided on this! Wikipedia, if you trust it, is clear that a diphthong is a "gliding vowel sound", where you move from one vowel to another.

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