/ winsdows 7 help it's just died

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lost1977 - on 28 Jan 2013
windows 7 seems to have just died big time on my machine. no internet, firewall won't switch on/off, no system restore won't recognise external drives.


i have managed to switch over hard drives to one which has a working copy, any suggestions or is it going to be a case to try to retrieve as much as i can off the drive i took out then atempt to reinstall
dissonance - on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to lost1977:

how has it died? any particular error or just not playing?
you can go in using safe mode (press f8 as you boot).
lost1977 - on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to dissonance:

no warning just stopped
dissonance - on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to lost1977:

> no warning just stopped

so what did you get?
did everything just freeze, an old style blue screen or just booted out?
EeeByGum - on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to lost1977: Sounds more like your hardware has gone pop. Hard disk controller or similar?
lost1977 - on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to dissonance:

its allowed me to do a system restore in safe mode which seems to have worked (kind of)
lost1977 - on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to lost1977:

bizarrely i did a system restore to a point only about a week ago and now my computer tells me it's 00:09 on the 06/12/2011
rallymania - on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to lost1977:

that's the system clock, which as someone else already suggested... might mean your main board is about to die

in other words

you have an up to date backup don't you? (hint hint)

:-)
cap'nChino - on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to rallymania: I had this a while back. I replaced the hard drive and it has worked fine since.
thedoctorisin - on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to lost1977: Hard drive is corrupted by the sound of it, safe mode doesn't require as much info from the harddrive so you can still boot. I'd suggest you back up as much as poss in safe mode then buy a new hardrive. Seagate hardrives are pretty good.
lost1977 - on 28 Jan 2013
since doing a system restore it seems to be working fine but i have jist made a back up
captain paranoia - on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to lost1977:

Need to replace backup battery on the motherboard? Might explain the clock issue.
lost1977 - on 28 Jan 2013
In reply to captain paranoia:

will do, is it a difficult job on a laptop
cap'nChino - on 31 Jan 2013
In reply to lost1977: typical, I spoke too soon. I am having the same problem now. But it is unusual for a hard drive to fail after only a few months. Won't even load in safe mode
dissonance - on 31 Jan 2013
In reply to cap'nChino:
> (In reply to lost1977) typical, I spoke too soon. I am having the same problem now. But it is unusual for a hard drive to fail after only a few months.

it is one of the most likely times for it to fail. Hard drives follow a bath tub model of failure
The Lemming - on 31 Jan 2013
In reply to dissonance:

Never heard of that. How does that work?

BTW get an SSD drive. I've got one on my desktop and its fookin fast to boot up. Plus they aren't all that expensive these days.
needvert on 31 Jan 2013
In reply to dissonance:

Do they?

http://static.usenix.org/event/fast07/tech/schroeder/schroeder_html/index.html

The second observation is that replacement rates are rising significantly over the years, even during early years in the lifecycle. Replacement rates in HPC1 nearly double from year 1 to 2, or from year 2 to 3. This observation suggests that wear-out may start much earlier than expected, leading to steadily increasing replacement rates during most of a system's useful life. This is an interesting observation because it does not agree with the common assumption that after the first year of operation, failure rates reach a steady state for a few years, forming the ``bottom of the bathtub''.

Next, we move to the per-month view of replacement rates, shown in Figure 4. We observe that for the HPC1 file system nodes there are no replacements during the first 12 months of operation, i.e. there's is no detectable infant mortality. For HPC4, the ARR of drives is not higher in the first few months of the first year than the last few months of the first year. In the case of the HPC1 compute nodes, infant mortality is limited to the first month of operation and is not above the steady state estimate of the datasheet MTTF. Looking at the lifecycle after month 12, we again see continuously rising replacement rates, instead of the expected ``bottom of the bathtub''.
lost1977 - on 31 Jan 2013
In reply to The Lemming:

i've got an SSD in mine
dissonance - on 31 Jan 2013
In reply to needvert:
> (In reply to dissonance)
>
> Do they?

interesting, seems to vary from earlier studies.
the high initial failure rate seems upheld though.
Philip on 31 Jan 2013
In reply to lost1977:
> (In reply to The Lemming)
>
> i've got an SSD in mine

That might be why. SSD are fast but I would never trust my data on one.
cap'nChino - on 31 Jan 2013
In reply to lost1977: I mountable boot volume. Does that mean anything o anyone. I've trawled google but there is too much to go on.
cap'nChino - on 31 Jan 2013
In reply to cap'nChino: *unmountable
lost1977 - on 31 Jan 2013
In reply to Philip:

not much data on SSD pretty much just windows, bulk off data on externals
ads.ukclimbing.com
itsThere on 31 Jan 2013
In reply to lost1977: I used linux to get the files off my old HDD when windows died. The install disk refused to say the hard drive was even there when i reformated it. Booted linux from a pendrive and got all my files back.

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