/ Them there himalaya's

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andrew breckill - on 06 Feb 2013
Now then chaps, been offered a chance of a life time offer of accomodation and guide for Tibet, so means will have a comfy 'base' to set off from, and its going to be a tad higher than I have done int' t'Alps. I am going out in October this year and was wondering on physical and physiological preparations I can do in the mean time. I have some weight to loose (4 stone which I have started on losing). Gear wise, got the same gear that has seen me through scottish winter and alpine summer conditions, I'll list gear I have, some suggestions would be welcome if anything missing. 4 season crux x2 tent, 4 season ME lightline sleeping bag, tailored 3/4 sleeping mat, 50cm ultralight full length thermarest, Rab vapor rise tops and trousers, north face down jacket (I have only used down to -10 and was OK), thick montane smock, merino wool socks, msr xgkII stove, msr pocket rocket, msr titan cookset, kettle and fork and spoon. 2 x large msr fuel bottles, service kit for stove, terra nova leather finger gloves and terra nova mitts. Because I have the relative luxury of a house to return to I will not need to be over burdened with gear, any suggestions as to how make best use of this scenario would be welcome.
ice.solo - on 06 Feb 2013
In reply to andrew breckill:

deoends what you mean by 'tibet'. its a huge place and not easy to get about. if youre talkin lhasa - its a long way to the himalayas. if youre talkin zhangmu or somewhere along the highway but up on the plateau its rife with redtape, so best check what access you will have before committing.

either way, you wont get out of the gear conundrum as you will need to be totally self-sustained. october wont be the warmest time of year.

if youre talkin elsewhere in 'tibetAN' areas of nepal, sikkim etc (ie south side) you will have better conditons.

as for prep - long, hard cardio stuff with weight that increases your efficiency. a lot of leg work and 'pack carrying muscles'. perfect pissing into a bottle.
andrew breckill - on 07 Feb 2013
In reply to ice.solo: I'll be somewhere around the Annapurna area, don't know where the hell I got Tibet from, and to think I mock Marie's geography skills, it is Nepal I have been invited to. Leg strength was something I had in spades. Long cardio is going to be a challenge, still, no pain no gain. pissing in bottle well practiced. Thanks for your advice.
andrew breckill - on 07 Feb 2013
In reply to andrew breckill: oh yeah, boots, got a pair of scarpa Thermo Matterhorn, however are a close fitting boot as used for ice climbing previously so may not be thermo enough, do I need plastics???
mypyrex - on 07 Feb 2013
In reply to andrew breckill: The northern part of the Annapurnas is not unlike Tibet. It's dry and dusty, being in the rain shadow of the mountains. A lot of the people are of Tibetan origin and at Chhairp, south of Marpha there is a Tibetan refugee village.
almost sane - on 07 Feb 2013
In reply to andrew breckill:
I heartily recommend a really comfy mat.

I am a huge fan of the Exped Down Mat. It costs a FORTUNE, but is very very warm and very very comfortable.
If you are sleeping on the ground for any length of time, this will make a big difference.
And it will be really good for wild camping in the UK too.

As for prep, cardio, cardio, cardio.
It is not just about being able to do a big day. You want to be able to do a big day after you have already done three big days, and still be able to do another big day tomorrow.

I would also recommend you try to get as many multi-day walks done beforehand. Walks where you are camping. You want your camp craft to be slick. You want to be really really comfortable about living in a tent.

For info, I recommend Medex. Read their free book. Take it with you. Learn about altitude.
I also suggest a small first aid book, plus a set of medicines.
http://medex.org.uk//medex_book/english_version.php
http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1852847158/ref=asc_df_185284715811831725?smid=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&tag=hydr... is a good one.

Above all, be flexible, look for the moments of beauty and joy, and have a great time :)
ads.ukclimbing.com
andrew breckill - on 08 Feb 2013
In reply to almost sane: Mr Sane!!! greatings, you still on here then, its been a long time since I ventured out, and am thinking of a trip to scotland for the plan you suggest, thinking of say ben nevis sunnit via the arrete, then down tourist path then back up red burn, then down the arrete, then walk around the back and up easy gully, then see how I feel. Then a pop across to the alps and see how my lungs hold out. thanks for the tip ref the books. Interesting what you said about being slick, in my heyday, have pitched a quasar in gale force winds in around 5 minutes, tried it in the back garden last snow we had and it took ages, was quite comical.

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