/ What rack for Comici / Cima Grande?

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pawelx - on 08 Feb 2013
The article here says a full set of nuts and some cams. On the other hand my mate who did this route back in 2000 or so said there were pegs every meter, and bolted stances. As such he was recommending keeping it light and not taking too much trad gear.. what do people think?
shark - on 08 Feb 2013
In reply to pawelx:

Its not a clip-up - your mate obviously forgot the easy pitches but yes the hard bits have loads of pegs. A full set of nuts and some cams sounds right.
pawelx - on 08 Feb 2013
In reply to shark: are the stances bolted?
John Gillott - on 08 Feb 2013
In reply to pawelx:
> (In reply to shark) are the stances bolted?

No, clusters of pegs - pretty bombproof but maybe back up with a wire or two in some cases.
Mike Highbury - on 08 Feb 2013
In reply to John Gillott:
> (In reply to pawelx)
> [...]
>
> No, clusters of pegs - pretty bombproof but maybe back up with a wire or two in some cases.

How do you know how bombproof they are?
John Gillott - on 08 Feb 2013
In reply to Mike Highbury:

Guides belay their heavy clients straight off them - and they wouldn't want to be pulled off afterwards.
In reply to John Gillott:
> (In reply to Mike Highbury)
>
> Guides belay their heavy clients straight off them - and they wouldn't want to be pulled off afterwards.

You might want to consider rephrasing that?


Chris

;-)
Mike Highbury - on 08 Feb 2013
In reply to John Gillott:
> (In reply to Mike Highbury)
>
> Guides belay their heavy clients straight off them - and they wouldn't want to be pulled off afterwards.

Yeh, you can say that again.
John Gillott - on 08 Feb 2013
In reply to Chris Craggs:
> (In reply to John Gillott)
> [...]
>
> You might want to consider rephrasing that?
>
>
> Chris
>
> ;-)

You mean they're pretty quick with a penknife? Or were you thinking that it's not just the clients who are heavy?
edinburgh_man on 08 Feb 2013
In reply to John Gillott:

I think he meant the "they wouldn't want to be pulled off afterwards" bit.
edinburgh_man on 08 Feb 2013
In reply to Chris Craggs:

Nice one chris, that cheered me up.
John Gillott - on 08 Feb 2013
In reply to Chris Craggs:
> (In reply to John Gillott)
> [...]
>
> You might want to consider rephrasing that?
>
>
> Chris
>
> ;-)

Ah yes, very good (thanks Mike) - my mind isn't working in the right way this morning.
BenTiffin - on 12 Feb 2013
In reply to pawelx: Well pegged on the hard bits, the easier bits for the top third however are very much reliant on your own kit and were very wet in the very hot summer of 2003.
lmarenzi - on 12 Feb 2013
In reply to pawelx:

If you are thinking of doing the better Costantini variant (about E3 4b) at the top then bring some small tricams - they were invented in the Dolomites for a reason.

Belays are two or three rusty old pegs in rubbish rock, which is pretty much what all the belays are up the harder bottom half of the route. Guides are happy to let their clients second belaying direct off these, and so would I be. But then the guides, who have the route dialed, lead, so the risk of a fall direct onto the belay is very low. I didn't see a single belay that I thought would hold a proper factor 2 fall. So be careful.

In the bottom half of the Comici there is no need to place any trad gear at all, plenty of pegs of various quality, but you might need quite a few QDs (15 or so?).

Good luck!
jimtitt - on 12 Feb 2013
In reply to lmarenzi:
> (In reply to pawelx)
....bring some small tricams - they were invented in the Dolomites for a reason.
>

Didnīt know Greg Lowe was a resident Italian at that time, his company was always based in Colorado.
lmarenzi - on 12 Feb 2013
In reply to jimtitt:

Happy to stand corrected on that. For some reason I seemed to remember that tricams were invented and made in Bolzano, but I am wrong on both counts.

Good knowledge Jim.
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ddriver - on 12 Feb 2013
In reply to jimtitt:
> (In reply to lmarenzi)
> [...]
> ....bring some small tricams - they were invented in the Dolomites for a reason.
> [...]
>
> Didnīt know Greg Lowe was a resident Italian at that time, his company was always based in Colorado.

Then again, the Lowe clan invented most all of that stuff while they were in their home grounds of Ogden, Utah. Can't let Colorado lay claim to the Lowes, now.

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