/ Has anyone claimed for equipment after a car crash?

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airbournegrapefruit on 11 Feb 2013
As per title:

My friend had a bit of an accident on the b4246 yesterday after swerving to avoid an oncoming motorist in the middle of the road and he ended up with his car wrapped around a tree (driver and passengers are all ok). The one small problem is that in the boot of the car was all of our caving clubs kit, not really worried about fabric products as they'll be fine, it is the helmets I am a little more concerned about. The car was a complete write off if that gives you any indication as to the force of the crash.

Can things like this usually be claimed through the car insurance?
Mike00010 - on 11 Feb 2013
In reply to airbournegrapefruit:

You should be able to claim for items that were damaged in the crash. Make sure that they're identified to the insurance company straight away and see what information they will require in order to replace them. I claimed for an inspection and service of diving equipment that was in the back of my car when it was hit and the insurance company paid up as it was life support equipment that had potentially been damaged.

Mike
JayPee630 - on 11 Feb 2013
In reply to Mike00010:

I had a car crash a year ago and have claimed for some climbing gear that was damaged (oil, diesel, broken glass, and impact) for helmet, harness, and ropes. It was someone else's fault, and the insurance, while still waiting for the claim ti be settled, haven't batted an eyelid about it. Had to provide photos and receipts, that's all.
Mal Grey - on 11 Feb 2013
In reply to airbournegrapefruit:

Yes, in theory, but the normal maximum value on a standard policy limits contents damage/theft to quite a low value, unless you specifically increased this when you got the policy out. As I found out to my cost once...think mine was 150 limit....all the bits and bobs added up to about 1200...grr.





another_mark on 11 Feb 2013
In reply to Mal Grey: that would only matter if the claim is paid by your own insurance. Where the fault for the accident lies elsewhere (and you have identified the person responsible) then their insurance is liable. Any delay/issue then start small claims process against the other driver.
nniff - on 11 Feb 2013
In reply to another_mark:
> (In reply to Mal Grey) that would only matter if the claim is paid by your own insurance. Where the fault for the accident lies elsewhere (and you have identified the person responsible) then their insurance is liable. Any delay/issue then start small claims process against the other driver.

Exactly - it all depends on whether the other driver is still involved or has disappeared into the night.....
martinph78 on 12 Feb 2013
In reply to airbournegrapefruit: I've been wondering about this lately, since having my bike hung on the back of the car. I pressumed that if someone hit me I'd be able to claim on their insurance, but I know if the accident was my fault I wouldn't be covered (only up to 500 for personal items).

AndrewHuddart - on 12 Feb 2013
In reply to airbournegrapefruit:

I claimed and won for ropes which had POL damage after a big smash so it can be done.
Oli - on 12 Feb 2013
In reply to nniff: I suspect an insurance company will call it 50/50 blame in this case unless there are other witnesses available.
gordo - on 12 Feb 2013
it will be your mates fault it happened to one of my mates and the insurance company said even though the other car was on the wrong side of the road it was his actions that caused him to hit the lamppost and nothing to do with the other driver and was advised to just hold his line next time and not make an attempt to swerve just to brake. as then it would be the other car hitting you rather than you hitting lamppost.
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Cameron94 on 12 Feb 2013
In reply to gordo:
> it will be your mates fault it happened to one of my mates and the insurance company said even though the other car was on the wrong side of the road it was his actions that caused him to hit the lamppost and nothing to do with the other driver and was advised to just hold his line next time and not make an attempt to swerve just to brake. as then it would be the other car hitting you rather than you hitting lamppost.


That's probably the best (read- worst) advice I've seen on ukc for a while!

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