/ Dissertation questionnaire, Please help. Motivations to climb

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Tom Keaveny - on 16 Feb 2013
Hi my name is Tom, I'm a 3rd year student at the University of Cumbria, currently in the process of writing my dissertation. This is; 'An investigation on how differing psychological motivations effect performance in Rock Climbing'. I feel this might be a interesting piece of research as it will look not only at high motivation, but the different types of psychological motivations and how they link to performance levels. As such I've designed a survey to record data to analyse and correlate. I'd be really grateful if you'd be able to take the time out to complete it. The link's below;
Any questions please feel free to ask.

Cheers,

Tom

http://kwiksurveys.com/s.asp?sid=3w9o45ksu3t28gf91272
Simon Caldwell - on 16 Feb 2013
In reply to Tom Keaveny:
Does nobody climb for the pleasure of being outdoors any more? To get to places you couldn't otherwise get? For the joy of being in the hills? Is it really all about technique?
dale1968 - on 16 Feb 2013
In reply to Toreador:
> (In reply to Tom Keaveny)
> Does nobody climb for the pleasure of being outdoors any more? To get to places you couldn't otherwise get? For the joy of being in the hills?

that's not what he researching
Bulls Crack - on 16 Feb 2013
In reply to Tom Keaveny:


Was the 'Do I wish to progress to the next page?' question a metaphor of some sort?
Simon Caldwell - on 16 Feb 2013
In reply to dale1968:
> that's not what he researching

there are other types of motivation included that aren't what is being researched either - eg "in order to meet people". Surel;y to find out about those who fit his profile he needs to include the motivations nof those who don't? Otherwise you just get a load of 1s and 2s, and no idea why that person climbs.
victim of mathematics - on 16 Feb 2013
In reply to Tom Keaveny:

Do you really mean 'Effect'?
Tom Keaveny - on 16 Feb 2013
In reply to Toreador:
Thanks for your feedback, the survey I have created is an adaptation of Pelletiers Sports motivation scale (SMS), this scale is perhaps the most widely used tool for recording sports motivation. I understand climbing is a varied activity, which many regard as much more than a sport, myself included. However for my dissertation topic I have chosen to regard it as a sport, as such allowing me to use tools such as the SMS and attempt to stick to a qualitative method of research. However if you feel like you wish to express you're own opinions, there is a secondary piece of research I propose to do, which discusses why some climbers choose seemingly dangerous routes where other avoid them. For this research I plan to use interviews. If you're keen to get involved, please message me your email or leave it at the end of the survey.
Cheers.
Tom
Tom Keaveny - on 17 Feb 2013
Thanks very much to all those who've completed my survey. Much appreciated!
andrew ogilvie - on 17 Feb 2013
In reply to Toreador: Agree with you, my rock climbing/ winter climbing is sort of an emergent property of my "use" of the mountains more generally. There was only one of the 38 or so questions that really addressed my motivation to climb.

I also find it strange that these surveys always seem to interrogate excitement but never seem to allow for control of emotional and physical stimuli which I think are far more important. For me "excitement" and adrenaline are generally markers of an unsatisfactory climbing experience.
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innesmac - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to Tom Keaveny:

Hi Tom, all the best with your distertation, might be worthwhile going down to your local walls and also a BMC meet to get more veiws

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