/ Ben lomond

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Carlos236 - on 17 Feb 2013
Hi everyone I'm pretty new to this seeing as I've only climbed one mountain whilst on holiday in Crete, but I was hoping for some advice as ill be climbing Ben lomond in a couple of weeks. I do walk but never really up a snowy mountain, I have a good pair of boots waterproofs and a good fleece lined jacket. I read online that I should take a few precautions so ill be taking emergency blankets and other emergency items, a good supply of water and food with me, also a camping stove for a cheeky cup of tea. I chose Ben lomond as I heard it was a good place to start and would appreciate any tips thanks.
n.LiVE - on 17 Feb 2013
In reply to Carlos236: Take an ice axe with you, a simple walking axe would suffice, and learn how to self arrest. Check the mwis and sais websites for weather and avalanche reports. Do you know how to use a map+compass? A head torch is a good idea, especially this time of year as the days are shorter. Are you going with someone who has some experience?
Jim C - on 17 Feb 2013
In reply to Carlos236:
As you are a novice, better safe than sorry, and others will say it's easy, which it can be.

Try looking here:
http://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/lochlomond/ben-lomond.shtml
A wee video from the top
http://www.flickr.com/photos/22776031@N05/6533098569/in/set-72157628478645345

Stick to the 'tourist track' (anti clockwise) and come down the same way , avoid the Ptarmagan route which is a little trickier, don't be tempted to follow others down that route.
Take plenty of warm clothes, I have been up a few mountains, and Ben Lomond is my local hill, but I have had some really cold days up there.

The track can get pretty icy, but can be avoided, however the grass to the side can have hidden ice, so on the way down if you don't feel up to crampons, at least take some of those slip over boot anti slip devices. I don't know how sure footed you are, so playing safe.

In case it clags in, always take a map and compass and , know how to use ithem, or at least know what direction you should be heading when ascending/ descending, an be able to set and and follow those bearings.

They now charge for parking ( the bast***s)
If you get here early the hotel has a few spaces right at the front of the loch side, snag is the 4x4 brigade soon take up double the spaces that cars would take up.

If it is an icy morning, watch the road on the way up, it is rarely gritted, that could be the trickiest part of the day, particularly if you have a rear wheel drive car!

I'm sure you will be fine and these are just precautions as I don't know you.
Father Noel Furlong on 17 Feb 2013
In reply to Carlos236:

My dad used to take me up Ben Lomond when i was 7 in white out conditions in wellies a jumper and a tin of cold soup for lunch.


But then he was mad.
Carlos236 - on 17 Feb 2013
In reply to Jim C: Thanks for the tips and advise, no I won't be going up with anyone with experience on snowy or icey mountains, I do have some crampons but wasn't sure whether I would need them or not but I'll be taking them anyway. I'll be sure to stick to the tourist route thanks.
Carlos236 - on 17 Feb 2013
In reply to n.LiVE: Thanks for the tips, yeah I know how to use a map and compass, and I'll make sure ill take a touch and axe with me too thanks for the tips.
Jim C - on 17 Feb 2013
In reply to Father Noel Furlong:
> (In reply to Carlos236)
>
> My dad used to take me up Ben Lomond when i was 7 in white out conditions in wellies a jumper and a tin of cold soup for lunch.
>
>
> But then he was mad.

Yep I see fathers like him every winter, they get the kids up, but often struggle to get them down as quick if it is icy, and then they get really cold. I have helped a few over the years.

No maps no compass, no spare clothes no suitable footwear, and crucially no brains, or sense of responsibility towards their kids. Harsh but true .

Wee Davie - on 17 Feb 2013
In reply to Carlos236:

I was up there today. Snow was wet and thawing at all levels. If I was you I'd check MWIS or the Met Office mountain forecasts- look out for forecasts of heavy snow or high winds (anything above 40mph is likely to be pretty uncomfortable). If the temperatures are forecast to be freezing you will nedd to adjust your clothing and equipment as necessary.
I walked up there today with the dog in nice weather. It's a very popular hill- but it could be a serious walk in bad weather.
Jim C - on 17 Feb 2013
In reply to Carlos236:

Worth watching this right through, 20 mins from the top it changed to what you see in the video.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/22776031@N05/6532871953/in/set-72157628478645345/lightbox/
Father Noel Furlong on 17 Feb 2013
In reply to Jim C:
> (In reply to Father Noel Furlong)

> No maps no compass, no spare clothes no suitable footwear, and crucially no brains, or sense of responsibility towards their kids. Harsh but true .

Harsh but also incorrect. My old man was tough as boots and wanted his kids to be too. He was also poor and couldn't afford decent gear. A great man and a true inspiration.

If I'd been answering the OP truthfully I'd have said stop being such a pussy and go up the hill. It's only Ben Lomond for fecks sake!
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Jim C - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to Father Noel Furlong:
> (In reply to Jim C)
> [...]
>
> [...]
>
> Harsh but also incorrect. My old man was tough as boots and wanted his kids to be too. He was also poor and couldn't afford decent gear. A great man and a true inspiration.
>
> If I'd been answering the OP truthfully I'd have said stop being such a pussy and go up the hill. It's only Ben Lomond for fecks sake!

Wise words indeed!


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